Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Sunday, 12 September 2021

Sunday Selections #550


Sunday Selections was originally brought to us by Kim, of Frogpondsrock, as an ongoing meme where participants could post previously unused photos languishing in their files.
 
Huge thanks to Cie who gave me this wonderful Sunday Selections image.
 
The meme was then continued by River at Drifting through life.  Sadly she has now stepped aside (though she will join us some weeks), and I have accepted the mantle. 
 
The rules are so simple as to be almost non-existent.  Post some photos under the title Sunday Selections and link back to me. Clicking on any of the photos will make them embiggen.  
 

I usually run with a theme.  We are still in lockdown.  In theory it will be lifted at the end of next week - but I have my doubts.  Lifeline is considered an essential service, so my volunteering there continues - and it gives me an outing.

The next photos show some of my trip in last week.

I know I have posted photos of this mural before, but I like it.  A lot.  



There were very few people around to enjoy this (and other) flower boxes in town but they brightened my spirits.





 These photos were taken of the main road through the centre of the city - at peak hour.

Reverting to the sky, the birds and the garden at home.






Watching this galah groom was a delight.  I admired his/her flexibility too.





The photos above show why green apples (and for some reason they have to be green) are a fixture on our shopping list.

Then to the garden.  More comes out each and every day.  So far the tulips are almost all red, but that will change over the coming days/weeks.




That bee has collected plenty of pollen hasn't it?










 I hope you all stay safe, healthy and sane(ish) in the week to come, and find plenty of things that bring you joy.

Friday, 10 September 2021

World Suicide Prevention Day

Today, September the 10th is set aside as an awareness day to mark a world-wide commitment to reducing the number of suicides, and marks the start of World Suicide Prevention week.

Like so many other health and safety issues, one day/week is totally insufficient.  The available data (which is incomplete and delayed) suggests that more people kill themselves than die in wars, terrorist acts and interpersonal violence combined.  Without question Covid has increased those numbers, and they will stay high for quite some time.  The crisis phone lines are ringing hot, and the pain, the fear, the desperation are so very evident.

I have some personal understanding of the issues and emotions involved.  I spend time in the dark places myself and know both how fast and easy the plummet to the bottom can be and how very hard it is to see the light at the end of the proverbial tunnel much less climb out again.  In those dark days suicide has seemed like a viable solution, and a way to end my pain.  It has also seemed like a solution for the burdens I impose on those who know and/or love me.

Most of you know I do voluntary work with Lifeline Australia, a telephone crisis line.  Almost everyone who rings those lines with thoughts of suicide has at least a degree of ambivalence.  I, and all the other volunteers, will work on that ambivalence to keep the caller safe for the moment/the day and to help them see and consider other options.   Lifeline believes that suicide is often preventable and that the start of the journey to safety can be only a phone call away.  It is often a long and painful journey but should never ever be one that people feel condemned to walk alone.

Here in Australia suicide is still the leading cause of death for people aged under 44.  More people die from suicide each year than are killed on the roads.  Sadly even before the pandemic the numbers of people we lose to suicide were rising again.  Which, given that I suspect suicide is under reported, is scary.

Not only does suicide take its toll on our young, there are other groups who are over-represented in its tragic ranks including (but not limited to) our indigenous population, the LGBTQI community, people with mental health issues, farmers, tradesmen, the unemployed, and the military.  While we still lose more men to suicide than women, the numbers of women who die to suicide is climbing (an equality I don't want). 

In 2011 Lifeline began  national suicide prevention walks - 'Out of the Shadows and into the Light'. The walks begin before dawn and continue into the growing light.  It remembers those lost and those bereaved by suicide, with an additional focus on raising awareness.  The symbolism of starting the walk in the dark and progressing into the light of a new day means a lot to me.  Some centres start their walk later (ten or eleven) to attract more people and publicity.  I can see why, but am glad that our walks start in the dark.  This date and the event are important to me.  Sadly my city is still in lockdown and this year's walk has been cancelled.  I expect that the same is true in two of our most populous states.  My heart goes out to the bereaved and to those at risk.

I don't think that all suicide is wrong, particularly given our euthanasia laws.  However, it is such a final decision that I hope it is not the first option considered or tried.  And, as a solution to a temporary problem, I do think it is wrong.  Right or wrong it is always a tragedy.  A tragedy for the person who had, or believed they had, no other options and a tragedy for those they leave behind.  And the ripples from that tragedy encompass a lot of people.  Research shows that each time someone suicides, there are up to 135 people affected.  In addition there is strong evidence that if someone close to you dies by suicide your own chances of taking that path are dramatically increased.  
 

RU OK day (September 14) is also celebrated in World Suicide Prevention Week.  A  simple question we should be asking family, friends and colleagues every day.



Some services and links which may be useful for Australian readers include:

Lifeline 1311 14

Suicide Call Back Service

These lines are open 24 hours a day, but they are also inundated with callers.  You may not get through straight away, but please keep trying.

I do hope that you, and those you love are safe.  So many of you have become very dear to me.  Be kind, and include yourselves in that kindness.

 

 

Sunday, 5 September 2021

Sunday Selections #549

 


Sunday Selections was originally brought to us by Kim, of Frogpondsrock, as an ongoing meme where participants could post previously unused photos languishing in their files.
 
Huge thanks to Cie who gave me this wonderful Sunday Selections image.
 
The meme was then continued by River at Drifting through life.  Sadly she has now stepped aside (though she will join us some weeks), and I have accepted the mantle. 
 
The rules are so simple as to be almost non-existent.  Post some photos under the title Sunday Selections and link back to me. Clicking on any of the photos will make them embiggen.   

I usually run with a theme.  This week I am mostly posting photos from home again.  We are still in lockdown.

Waiting outside the chemist for prescriptions to be filled (goodness what an exciting outing) I spotted this mural.

 

It is outside an Early Learning Centre and I liked that it avoided cliches about carer's gender and about nationality.  The garden beside it was cheery too - and has tulips in bud.



 I have spent a lot of the week in our garden.  Weeding (much more to be done) and just wandering.  Ours is not an 'ordered' garden.  Himself likes plants in rows and indeed plants them that way.  I plant between, behind and in front of his rows.  They are still there - but I cannot see them.

Starting with the colour which was very evident even on a foggy morning.



Then to another orchid which is blooming.  I was particularly pleased to see this one.  Years ago we bought it for a friend's birthday.  Before we could give it to her a certain cat (who sometimes answers to Jazz) batted it all round the kitchen and knocked every single bud and bloom from it.  We bought our friend something different and put it outside.  Where it sulked.  This year for the first year since it has flowered.



I will finish this post with a plethora of other photos from the gardenjungle.





You will notice that the daffodil in the photo above has been chewed.  I suspect that the snail (or his relatives) on the jonquils (also in that photo) may have had something to do with that.










I am blown away by the incredible variety of daffodils that are available now.


My mother always grew grape hyacinths too.  It was my first mondegreen (when she talked about them I always heard grey pythons and couldn't understand where the name came from).  I now have some snowy white ones too and hope to take a successful photo of them soon.





I hope your week is filled with colour, with texture, with scent and with joy.