Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Sunday, 20 September 2020

Sunday Selections #499!!!





Sunday Selections was originally brought to us by Kim, of Frogpondsrock, as an ongoing meme where participants could post previously unused photos languishing in their files.

Huge thanks to Cie who gave me this wonderful Sunday Selections image.
  
The meme was then continued by River at Drifting through life.  Sadly she has now stepped aside (though she will join us some weeks), and I have accepted the mantle.
 
The rules are so simple as to be almost non-existent.  Post some photos under the title Sunday Selections and link back to me. Clicking on any of the photos will make them embiggen. 
 
I usually run with a theme. And I OFTEN revert to one of my obsessions.  It is the bird obsession this week.


Heading into town early one morning a few weeks ago I watched a magpie gather sticks and arrange them in her nest.  It looked very flimsy and uncomfortable but I am sure it is much better now.






If you embiggen the last you will see she has some more nesting material in her beak.  I didn't go very close to her to give her some privacy.

In the weeks to come her choice of nesting spot will become unpopular.  Male magpies are very protective and will swoop people (beak clattering) if they think they are too close.  It is noisy and can be frightening and occasionally dangerous.  People will have to find a different spot to lunch in for a few weeks.

Mea Culpa:  Anna pointed out the error of my ways.  That is a currawong rather than a magpie.  Which I knew, but for some reason completely ignored when putting up this post.  The facts about magpies are correct, but the bird and the nest don't belong to magpies at all.

Then to a pair of corellas who delighted me at home.







I loved the very obvious affection between this grooming pair.

And then (again) to the yellow-tailed Black Cockatoo.  They are rare visitors at home and while I welcome them, I also know that they are visiting only because of the damage that the fires late last year and earlier this year did to their preferred habitat.  Damage that has not been fully repaired as we lurch towards another dangerous fire season.






Despite the name, the yellow tail was conspicuous by its absence in all of my photos, since the cockatoo stayed on the ground.  Better luck next time.

I hope your week is full of treats - expected and unexpected.
Next week, and probably for several weeks, I will be posting about my garden obsession and my city's celebration of Spring.  Again.

PS:  The very talented Charlotte(MotherOwl) has found a way for those of us who are less than impressed with New Blogger to remain with the Legacy version.  I followed her suggestions and have reverted.  If you are interested you can find the method HERE.

 

Sunday, 13 September 2020

Sunday Selections #498




Sunday Selections was originally brought to us by Kim, of Frogpondsrock, as an ongoing meme where participants could post previously unused photos languishing in their files.

Huge thanks to Cie who gave me this wonderful Sunday Selections image.
  
The meme was then continued by River at Drifting through life.  Sadly she has now stepped aside (though she will join us some weeks), and I have accepted the mantle.
 
The rules are so simple as to be almost non-existent.  Post some photos under the title Sunday Selections and link back to me. Clicking on any of the photos will make them embiggen. 
 
I usually run with a theme.  On Thursday I met my personal commitment and did the Out of the Shadows walk. (Thank you to all those who commented.  I do know that suicide is a confronting subject for many).  There was a breakfast meet up after the walk - making use of a coffee-cart at the walk's starting point.


However as usual I was peopled out and skipped breakfast.  Instead I walked into town to do an early shift on the crisis line.  It wasn't seven when I started walking (slowly), and the streets were quiet and often beautiful.  Equanimity was restored.

So, as I so often say, come walk with me.  And of course, a lot of my predictable focus was on birds and gardens.


I do love the way that the native birds (and this is a crimson rosella) are happy in our suburbs.






I really like this garden.  I am only in this part of town once a year (for the Out of The Shadows Walk) and I look forward to seeing how it has developed since my last visit.  I think it looks really inviting.


The angels continue to crowd this balcony and I smiled to see that it looks as if there is a fallen angel behind them.  I am sure there is a story here...




It looks as if what was once a very impressive single residence is now apartments.  And no doubt fairly expensive ones.


Gates fascinate me too.



I think that is a backpack - but it does look as if the child has sprouted wings...






I do hope that heavily pruned plant comes back.


In the space of less than a block everything changes as we move into a much more modern (and less personally appealing) part of town. 




 There are still flowers though - which I welcome.



I hope you all find peace and beauty in your week.

Thursday, 10 September 2020

Out of the Shadows 2020

Today, September 10th, is World Suicide Prevention Day, and the start of World Suicide Prevention Week.  I spend time in the dark places myself and know both how fast and easy the plummet to the bottom can be and how very hard it is to see the light at the end of the proverbial tunnel much less climb out again. 

Most of you know I do voluntary work with Lifeline Australia, a telephone crisis line.  Almost everyone who rings those lines with thoughts of suicide has at least a degree of ambivalence.  I, and all the other volunteers, will work on that ambivalence to keep the caller safe for the moment/the day and to help them see and consider other options.   Lifeline believes that suicide is often preventable and that the start of the journey to safety can be only a phone call away.  It is often a long and painful journey but should never ever be one that people feel condemned to walk alone.

Here in Australia suicide is still the leading cause of death for people aged under 44.  More people die from suicide each year than are killed on the roads.  Sadly the numbers of people we lose to suicide are rising again.  Which, given that I suspect suicide is under reported, is scary.  Without question Covid 19 is going to increase those numbers, across all age groups and without regard to gender, or sexuality.  

I don't think that all suicide is wrong, particularly given our euthanasia laws.  However, it is such a final decision that I hope it is not the first option considered or tried.  And, as a solution to a temporary problem, I do think it is wrong.  Right or wrong it is always a tragedy.  A tragedy for the person who had, or believed they had, no other options and a tragedy for those they leave behind.  And the ripples from that tragedy encompass a lot of people.  Research shows that each time someone suicides, there are up to 135 people affected.  In addition there is strong evidence that if someone close to you dies by suicide your own chances of taking that path are dramatically increased.

In 2011 Lifeline began  national suicide prevention walks - 'Out of the Shadows and into the Light'. The walks begin before dawn and continue into the growing light.  It remembers those lost and those bereaved by suicide, with an additional focus on raising awareness.  The symbolism of starting the walk in the dark and progressing into the light of a new day means a lot to me.  Some centres start their walk later (ten or eleven) to attract more people and publicity.  I can see why, but am glad that our walks start in the dark.


 Restrictions caused by Covid 19 meant that the walk was in doubt this year.  Which worried me.  I have made a private commitment (after missing the first) that I would attend all the subsequent walks.  However, at almost the last moment, it was decided that the walk would go ahead in Canberra again this year.  Physically distanced, but emotionally joined.

Which saw me heading off again before dawn this morning.  The issue is much more important than I am.    So I walked.  Slowly just as I do every year.  Stopping to take photos.

There were brief speeches.  Some of the names and ages of those lost were read out - which I find moving.  No longer nameless, but identified and missed...  This morning the ages ranged from 16 to 72.  One person was identified only as forever young which made me think 'They will not grow old, as we that are left grow old'.  There was also an acknowledgement that there are names we do not know, which doesn't diminish their loss.

A musician played a song 'Treading Water' which had particular significance for him, and which made many eyes leak.  His friend had identified this song as his favourite on the album, and died by suicide in the studio in which it was recorded.


Come walk with me, through the cool dawn, into the hopeful light of a new day.


At home - just before I headed off. 
 




I liked the moon, shining through the clouds reminding us that there was still light - and that our glasses were half full rather than empty.
 




You will notice that masks were rarely worn.  Hand sanitiser was used, and contact details for everyone was recorded.  My city has had no cases of Covid 19 for close to two months and a level of complacency has crept in.
 











 It was, as it always is, an emotionally charged walk.  Tears were shed, but there was also laughter.
 





RU OK day (September 14) is also celebrated in World Suicide Prevention Week.  A  simple question we should be asking family, friends and colleagues every day.




Some services and links which may be useful for Australian readers include:

Lifeline 1311 14

Suicide Call Back Service

I am putting up this post later than I would have liked and apologise, but I went on to do a shift on the crisis line after the walk.

Stay well, stay safe.