Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Wednesday, 26 April 2017

The Sculpture Garden

As I have mentioned in earlier posts The Sculpture Garden is an integral part of our National Art Gallery.  Unlike the gallery itself it is not subject to opening hours and visitors are free to wander through it at any time of the day (or night).

Some of the works I love, some are not to my taste, and I find some incomprehensible.  One at least of the works set me thinking... wondering just what sculpture is.   As is so often the case, my visit reminded me just how much I don't know.  About anything and everything.  I am however very happy that the Sculpture Gardens are here, and also grateful for the public art which is so prolific in my city.  There are lots and lots of sculptures in the garden and if I was to show them all, this would be a very long post, so I am only going to feature some of them. 

So again, come wander with me.

I am going to start with some pieces I find incomprehensible, which is not a criticism of the works, but a reflection of my ignorance.  I don't understand them, and don't know what the artists were trying to achieve.  They are certainly eye-catching.




    
And the same piece from a different angle.  This one is by Mark di Suvero and is called Ik ook (which is Dutch for me too).
It is a huge piece.  Over seven metres high and seven metres wide.


This is by Robert Klippel and is called Number 751.  The gallery has a number of his sculptures and none of them speak to me any more clearly than this one.

Then to some more conventional sculptures.


This is by Aristide Maillol and is called The Mountain.  If I was the model I would not be flattered by the title he chose.  At all.






These are by Rodin.  The first are studies for The burghers of Calais, and the last are shots of The Burghers from different angles.  Apparently in the 14th century six leading citizens (or burghers) surrended themselves to save their town of Calais from King Edward the Third of England.  They are depicted as starving, dragging their feet and facing the fact they are about to die.


This is by Gaston Lachaise and titled 'Floating figure'.  I doubt the truth of the title.  I am pretty certain she wouldn't float.




 Anthony Gormley's 'Angel of the North'.  Apparently this is one tenth the size of one near Gateshead in England.  The figure was apparently cast from the artist's body, with the wings made separately.

Then to more abstract images.



Clement Meadmore's Virginia seems to defy gravity.  It is an enormous piece of steel and is balanced on two small points.  It looks light and flexible - and apparently weighs over eight tonnes, despite being hollow.



 Bert Flugelman's Cones is also delicately balanced.  I was fascinated by the reflections of the surrounding trees - and unwary photographers.

Then to the one which had me questioning my definition of sculpture.  Rightly or wrongly I had always considered sculpture to be static. 

Fujiko Nakaya's 'Foggy wake in a desert:  An ecosphere' defies that definition.  It is made up of fine clouds of artificially created mist, drifting through the trees and a marsh pond.  It moves and changes with the breeze, the light, and even the numbers of people wandering through...

Further thought reminded me how silly my definition was.  Art is viewed differently by every individual, based on their life experience, mood, time of day...  So how can it be unchanging.  And why should it be?










I am only going to inflict show you two more sculptures in this post.  One which I found discomforting, and the other I loved.  Both are near the fog sculpture which waved tendrils of mist around them.

The discomforting one first.






It is entirely appropriate to feel uncomfortable here.  Dadang Christanto's 'Heads from the North' comes out of his experience of social and political injustice when growing up in Indonesia.  The sculpture is made up of 66 bronze heads and is a memorial to victims of violence following an unsuccessful military coup.  Dadang's father was one of the many who disappeared.  Dadang was eight at the time.








These are slit drums, by unknown artists and come from the Malampa Province of Vanuatu.  The sounds were incredible.  The carvings represent the faces of ancestors.  Magic would sometimes be invoked by a drum's creator to ensure that the ancestral faces were properly evoked, and the deep resonant sounds of the drums is said to summon the ancestors.

Do you wonder we spent happy hours there and will go back?

121 comments:

  1. Superb photos EC - I so much enjoyed seeing your choices. I love the Rodins (I am lucky enough to have seen the finished figures, in Calais). To me, his understanding of the human figure is second-to-none. The shiny cones are cool, but neither The Mountain nor the Floating Figure appeals.

    There are two which I would (and will) be left thinking about for a long time after seeing them: the ethereally beautiful floating fog, wraithlike and mysterious; and the instantly horrifying and hard-hitting 'Heads' by Dadang. Thank you so much for sharing these.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Alexia: I would think poorly of anyone who could just walk away from Heads from the North. To many cultures 'disappear' people who don't agree/fit in. And how devastating for their families. Forever.
      The floating fog is amazing isn't it? Shifting ground, revealing, concealing, masking...

      Delete
  2. All very interesting, indeed...some I do like.

    You can rest easy, though, EC....you're not Robinson Crusoe re the "sculpture" shown in the first three photos...and as for the "mist" being classified as "sculpture". I admit freely...they leave me baffled, too. :)

    But...in saying that...it is all very interesting...and thought-provoking. Thanks for allowing me to wander (and wonder) along with you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lee: On consideration I was happy to classify the mist as sculpture and loved the installation. I will happily view it again, and expect it to be very different.

      Delete
  3. Thank you.The only ones I'm familiar with are the Burghers of Calais I like Rodin very much and this particularly) and the ghastly Angel of the North.Ugly thing in my view.At least this is a bit smaller!
    And the foggy piece? Absolutely LOVE that.Would really,really like to wander there on a less-than-sunny day. And the Vanuatu drums. I'll have to tell my Vanuatu friend.
    Thank you for the outing,I might come back after lunch...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. dinahmow: We spent a LOT of time in the foggy piece. And marvelled at it. In the seventh photo I posted of it (goodness how excessive) there is a figure of another viewer - who has become a part of the installation. You would have had fun playing those drums too.

      Delete
  4. What a great place for the imagination to run riot.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. only slightly confused: It was. It is.

      Delete
  5. These are all so different from each other! I love the mist and find the depiction of the Heads to be very discomfiting, too. And the drums, what a treat! Thank you so much for sharing all these sculptures with me. :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. DJan: The sculpture garden crosses culture, time, genre. I found it intriguing and suspect there is something there for almost everyone. And the environment is lovely too.

      Delete
  6. I love the mist one. I would travel all the way to Australia just to see that. And you of course!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Birdie: Some day I hope you can. I really hope you can.

      Delete
  7. These are very interesting. Sculpture is an interesting art form.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jamie Ghione: Welcome and thank you. I am a fan of lots of art, and sculpture is often intriguing. Sometimes confusing, but that is fine too.

      Delete
    2. For the art class at my mental health center (where I work as a peer mentor), I suggested doing assemblage. Most of the others didn't know what that is, so I printed some examples, but they also wanted to see a physical example. So I did one at home. You can see this on my blog. And I plan to soon post the one I made in my class.

      Delete
    3. Jamie Ghione: Thank you so much. I have visited and explored. And can see a lot of potential in assemblage. Potential for self exploration, empowerment and for healing. And for fun.

      Delete
    4. I have just posted pictures of the assemblage I did for work.

      Delete
    5. Jamie Ghione: I have been and seen. And loved it.

      Delete
  8. Hmm, evocative and provocative. I'd say I appreciate a bit less than half of these works of art. Sometimes, I'm more bothered by thoughts of how many thousands of dollars the artist collected for their creations than I am by the fact that I have no idea what they are expressing.

    Be of good cheer, friend.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Rawknrobyn: I am a LOT more bothered by the ill-gotten gains of some of our politicians and businessmen than I am of artists.

      Delete
  9. Most of these are very different from what I think of when I hear the word sculpture, but it's good to be forced to think beyond my comfortable definitions. Did you get to hear the drums? (I'm gathering you did) They are amazing to look at, let alone hear. The heads in the water are sobering and unforgettable, with another layer for me on top of their true meaning (I fear being out of my depth).

    Steve Reed (his blog is Shadows & Light, and has lovely photography of many things including gardens, birds and all around England) recently visited the Angel of the North in Gateshead and wrote a post on it, complete with photos. It's here if you're interested: http://shadowsteve.blogspot.ca/2017/04/angel-of-north.html ... I was quite excited to see the one in your post. It's a very recognizable shape!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. jenny_o: I was happy/grateful to be pushed out of my comfort zone too. I did hear the drums - and was able to play them too. Which was amazing. Only using my hand, but the sound was deep, resonant and amazing. I am pretty sure the mist altered that too.
      I like your additional layer: Out of our depth is something most of us can respond to - further endorsement that we all bring different things and receive different things from art - whatever the genre.
      Thank you for the link to Steve Reed's blog. I will be over to check it out shortly.

      Delete
    2. So thrilling that you got to play the drums!

      Delete
    3. jenny_o: It was. And if there had been a group of people there, the sound that could have been produced would have been incredible. I would love to hear what musicians could do...

      Delete
  10. Goodness me!
    A BIG imagination is needed for most.
    Glad you showed us as it's good to see.
    The misty ones are ok.
    Heads in the water, good grief - to me someone with a sick mind.
    I recall a sculpture done in iron was paid for by a council here in Tasmania, it was ridiculous or hideous and council was very disappointed with it. It was displayed for several years, now it's disappeared.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Margaret-whiteangel: I would put the Heads From the North down to a disturbed and distressed mind rather than a 'sick' one. The artist's early experiences must haunt him.
      We have a lot of public art, and some of it attracts a heap of criticism. I am always glad to see it though.

      Delete
  11. Fantastic sculptures. Thanks for sharing such a treat. Those disembodied heads would make anyone uncomfortable.
    I can't say that I loved any of the sculptures in this post, but they're all supremely interesting.
    The metal abstractions in particular reminded me of a humorous story I read recently. It was in Russian, and I'm going to translate it and put it on my own site for everyone to enjoy. I might ask you for the use of one of your photos to illustrate that story.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Olga Godim: I was fascinated by quite a number of them, made uncomfortable by only one, and not fond of a few. A wonderful afternoon's wandering though.
      Of course you can use one of my photos. Let me know when you need it - and which one you would like. I have (of course) other photos of the same sculptures and I could send them so you could make your own selection. I look forward to reading your translation too.

      Delete
  12. Sculpture garden is interesting especially heafs in the water i always admire your nature

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Gosia k: Those heads in the water were so sad. And the fog added to the effect.

      Delete
  13. Wow.
    sculpture #1 looks like a giant catapult launcher
    #2 looks like a device for cramming rocks into those giant catapults
    the two naked male statues have hernias.
    I love the cones, I've seen them before somewhere, maybe here?
    I don't really like the fog, to me it looks more like smoke and brings forth thoughts of bush fires.
    I love the slit drums and would love to hear the sounds they make.
    The heads? Bleh.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. River: It was a very mixed bag wasn't it? The fog really didn't look like smoke, wrong colour and no smell, but I understand how you felt.

      Delete
  14. Such interesting sculpture, thanks for sharing. I like the shiny cones and the misty images. A garden can be whatever you want it to be. . .I'd love to hear those split drums, too.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. D.G Hudson: The split drums sounded amazing, and I would love to hear them played by someone who wasn't a rank amateur.

      Delete
  15. Hi EC - no ... I can quite understand why you'd go back ... what an incredible array of sculptures ... and I'll be back to read and look through your post ... cheers Hilary

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hilary Melton-Butcher: The range, from different cultures and mediums blew us away.

      Delete
  16. Something for everyone there
    Some I like some not so much
    The angle of the north is huge and not very inspiring well I didn't like it much but I've only seen the original at night.
    Merle...................

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Merlesworld: The original is HUGE. This one is much smaller, and I think less imposing.

      Delete
  17. Fascinating photos, EC. Sometimes I don't understand the meaning or purpose of a piece and then I realize maybe it's just to make one think and come up with their own theories of what it's about. I would certainly spend hours there and go back often. Thanks for sharing such lovely photos.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mason Canyon: Even neither understanding nor appreciating all the pieces it was a wonderful afternoon.

      Delete
  18. Dear EC
    What a fantastic variety of sculptures. I went to the Rodin museum in Paris when I was there and was captivated by his work, particularly those pieces where the sculpture has not been completely released from the stone (I'm the same with Michelangelo's 'trapped' sculptures). Those heads will stay with me for some time - eerie, disturbing but beautiful and coming from a terrible experience.
    I think my favourite piece is the one of the drum with the face on it (3rd up from the end) - there is just something about it which I find moving and fascinating.
    Thank you so much for the tour.
    Best wishes
    Ellie

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ellie Foster: I had never even heard of split drums before - and will explore. They were intriguing weren't they?

      Delete
  19. Such a beautiful place for a wander and look. I especially liked the cones and the mist. What an array of beautiful and challenging work. Thank you for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Marie Smith: Some of our National Institutions are truly wonderful - and this is one of them.

      Delete
  20. I absolutely love all of the sculptures. Art is in eye of the beholder, but I even like the ones that look only like metal with no reason. Although the head yard is a bit disturbing, I like it too. The fog pictures are awesome.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. T. Powell Coltrin: I am a big fan of sculpture. I didn't like all of these - but was glad to see them if that makes sense.

      Delete
  21. All interesting but some hard for me to understand too. I like the bare woman best!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bookie: The Mountain or the (non) Floating one? Very different weren't they?

      Delete
  22. What a wonderful city you live in. Always something to do and see.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. donna baker: And we don't see half of what is on offer. We should get out more.

      Delete
  23. I suppose I am picky about art in general. I don't like avant-garde or still life. I do love tribal. Those drums are incredible, reminding me of Easter Island, and I love the mist. It gives your camera the advantage of creating your own art with every shot!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. River Fairchild: Weren't the drums brilliant? And they sounded great too. I am pretty sure that the fog changed the sound as well. Just fascinating.

      Delete
  24. Such wonderful variation. I would love to have something like that sculpture garden anywhere near me. It dares to expand on the meaning of art and sculpture and I find that wonderful.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jono: I am so very grateful for the National Gallery. The special exhibitions are wonderful - but so are the permanent collections.

      Delete
  25. We have a sculpture garden about an hour away that is very similar to the one you have here. They even have the fog and a statue coming out of the water. Like you, I do not understand it all, but I do find them very interesting.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Starting Over, Accepting Changes - Maybe: How fascinating to learn that your sculpture garden has some strong similarities to ours. And thank you for letting me know that you are also mystified by some of the work.

      Delete
  26. Those Rodin sculptures are amazing. I wondered if there was some symbolism meant by the title of The Mountain and looked it up, but couldn't find anything. Yes - kind of offensive, seems like.

    Love the mist sculpture!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lynn: I would certainly be insulted at The Mountain description - but perhaps it was a private joke.
      I too loved the mist.

      Delete
  27. I'm not sure I would classify 'Foggy wake in a desert: An ecosphere' a sculpture, but I do find it interesting (& beautiful)!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. fishducky: It is beautiful isn't it? I took many, many, many photos.

      Delete
  28. must be missing Molly too much to find anything to say...

    ReplyDelete
  29. Thank you, Sue, for the education)))!!
    My fave. is the'Angel of the North'. xx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My Inner Chick: Have you seen the original? I am not sure which I liked best, but probably the fog sculpture and the drums...

      Delete
  30. Fascinating. Even if I had the talent which I don't, I can't imagine working with such large objects.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sandra Cox: I am constantly awed by artists - whatever the genre.

      Delete
  31. Bloody brilliant!! Love them! Anthony Gormley's 'Angel of the North', I've seen that a few times and it's huge. I prefer the smaller one I think. The tiny heads! They're all great, I like the setam misty one best probably, even though it's more of an installation. Well done that woman, fab photos x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. All Consuming: Isn't it an incredible range? And my trigger finger was very, very tired by the end of the day. Literally hundreds of photos.

      Delete
  32. Whoa, the heads in the water. All very cool photos.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The Happy Whisk: Heads from the North was heartbreaking.

      Delete
  33. I know so little about sculpture or art in general. I love your comments. They make me smile and I agree with them. I wish I was more educated about art appreciation because I'm learning how to paint and my husband is learning how to sculpt. But, I guess we're in pre-school level compared to the masters. I tend to simply like what has beauty and touches me.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Myrna R.: Painting? Sculpting? How amazing. Some time I would love to see some of your work. And even the masters had to begin somewhere.

      Delete
  34. "Wander with me" was an understatement. While your pictures were great, I'm sure being there was amazing. Thank you for taking us along.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Martin Kloess: I would love to have taken a whole lot of people with me in reality. Another wander coming up for Sunday Selections. A much more low key wander.

      Delete
  35. I love and once again envy the availability of experiences near you. As I said I am going to start taking some photos near here for comparison.
    I don't think we as viewers have to understand art, we just appreciate it for what it is.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anne in the kitchen: My special talent (you know, the one we were told we all have) is as an appreciator.

      Delete
  36. Absolutely fascinating. I have always been delighted with outdoor sculpture especially. It takes us out of the customary and familiar into new language of form and structure. Thank you for this fine tour!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Geo.: Thank you. I too am a big, big fan of street and outdoor art. And sculpture fills me with awe.

      Delete
  37. Thank you for sharing the riches of your world! Totally adore Rodin! Loved the silvery cones (they remind me of spinning tops) and the misty sculpture. Trust a Japanese artist to come up with something that's mindblowingly neat and spare like that!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nilanjana Bose: Isn't the misty sculpture clever. It certainly forced me to think - and marvel.

      Delete
  38. wow, I love the mist... and Rodin and most of the others too... I hope I get there to see for myself one of these days

    ReplyDelete
  39. WOW!So many fascinating scuptures in one place and like you some I struggle to understand and others I love. Thanks for shraaing allthese marvellous pieces of art.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Margaret Adamson: There are many more fine sculpture inside the Gallery too - but I love the outdoor setting. There were lots of birds too.

      Delete
  40. Thank you on and all. I have had a very, very busy couple of days, and will respond to comments and read emails when I am no longer cross-eyed with fatigue.

    ReplyDelete
  41. What a beautiful array of sculptures EC. The heads in the water are fabulous.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bob Bushell: Fabulous - and so very sad.

      Delete
  42. This is gorgeous. It reminds me of The Huntington out here in California.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Robert Bennett: Thank you. I will have to explore the Huntingdon (via the internet).

      Delete
  43. Sounds like Dadang's father's disappearance made a profound impression on him (as of course it would).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sandra Cox: The 'disappeared' never came back, and the families knew that nothing good had happened to them.

      Delete
  44. I don't care for a lot of them "Mountain" included. The Cones are interesting, and the heads in the fog, but they might creep me out.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Strayer: It is a very mixed collection isn't it? And yes, the 'Heads from the North' is creepy. And sad.

      Delete
  45. What a delightful sculpture garden. I do wish we had something comparable here, but nothing even close...
    The slit drums are fascinating. I'd love to hear them. Rodin's pieces are very moving & the fog piece looks very enchanting.
    I happened upon a Henry Moore piece outside our opera house here in SF. Although it was installed decades ago, it's the first time I really *saw* it. -nice to be surprised by discovering something in one's own backyard.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bea: I here you on the backyard front. We are constantly finding new things. Which fills us with shame - and glee.

      Delete
  46. I enjoyed the photos, my dear, and I'm joyful that you had a good time. There aren’t nearly so many tax-funded art projects in America as there are where you are, which is sad to me. On the other hand, I think that a lot of modern art falls under the definition of fraud—Andy Warhol for example—and I would deeply resent being forced to pay for it. When I lived in Minneapolis, the city’s art museum brought me enormous joy. One day, I decided, what the hell, I’m going to check out the city’s modern art institute. It’s called the Walker, and, as I understand it, enjoys a degree of renown. I lasted maybe a half hour, because it was nothing but crap piled higher in deeper in my view. I truly do believe there’s fraud in such things as throwing paint at a canvas and then selling it for big bucks, or in twisting a large piece of steel into what looks like something that belongs in a junkyard and giving it some pretentious name. One objection that people here raise in regard to publicly funded art is that sometimes it’s contemptuous of religion, and although you know my views on religion, I think the criticisms are sometimes valid due to the extremes to which artists often go. I mean, if you want to put Jesus on the cross and have a dog peeing on that cross, great, but don’t expect the public to pay for it. I think that there should be standards of decency, and, on a personal note, I want art to be pretty because it should call us to a higher plane rather than rub our faces in ugliness.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Snowbrush: Art can be such a divisive topic can't it? Some of it I love, some I like, some I loathe and quite a lot I don't understand. It doesn't have to be pretty for me to enjoy/value it, but it does have to make me think. And think more deeply than 'what a load of crap that it'.

      Delete
  47. Cracking shots. I was familiar with the Anthony Gormley. Thanks.

    Greetings from London.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. A Cuban in London: Thank you. Until I did a bit of investigation I hadn't realised that 'our' Angel of the North is a small replica of the original.

      Delete
  48. In my uneducated way, I tend to judge a sculpture by how much I want to touch it. I think the drums or The Mountain win on that measurement.
    It looks a beautiful garden and a pretty day for it. I hope you had a tasty snack at the end!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. kylie: I am immensely tactile as well. Years back both my father and I were evicted (almost simultaneously) from opposite ends of a pottery exhibition because neither of us could resist stroking the pots. In fairness, there were no signs saying we couldn't and the pots were for sale. I couldn't buy a piece of pottery without feeling the weight and the texture.
      It was a lovely day, but no snacking. We went home and had a cuppa instead.

      Delete
  49. I really like Sculpture Gardens and I must say I loved your tongue in cheek comments about some of them. Your line - Some of the works I love, some are not to my taste, and I find some incomprehensible. - spoke to me. Of all the sculptures you've shown my favourite are the floating cones. I simply love reading your wonderful, witty, ind blog posts.
    Xenophobia #Lexicon of Leaving

    ReplyDelete
  50. If you read my response in my blog (WFW), EC...you will see I have your back! :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lee: Thank you. Mind you I have a voice which could shatter a cardboard cup, so perhaps he wasn't toooo far off the mark.

      Delete
  51. Wow! Definitely a wide assortment of sculptures! I am always amazed at the variety and styles.

    My favorite is the fog. I know the mist is artificial- but it just looks so magical to me. I would love to wander through that area. :)
    ~Jess

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. DMS ~Jess: The fog is artificially created, but it very real. Small drops of water vapour - we commented it would be lovely in the height of summer. And yes, it was wonderful to wander through.

      Delete
  52. I have not visited the Sculpture Garden, though I have been to the National Art Gallery. How did I miss this? I do love the variety of sculptures. Great photos!!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. CountryMum: We don't visit it often enough either. Perhaps there needs to be more publicity?

      Delete
  53. I'm going to try again to leave a comment and hope the gremlins have taken a break. Thank you for sharing your thoughts and images of the Sculpture Garden and the emotional roller-coaster that accompanies them.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Kim: Thank you so much for perservering. The gremlins have indeed taken a break and allowed your comment to land.

      Delete
  54. What a jem your sculpture garden is. I visited a major art museum in a United States state capitol this past weekend. Not too many outdoor sculptures but there was an installation of a head that is drawing a lot of attention. But, nothing at all like what you shared with us.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The Unknown Journey Ahead: Welcome and thank you. I love our Gallery, and the Sculpture Garden is a beauty. With many more sculptures than I shared this post.

      Delete
  55. Oh how much did I enjoy this post. I wish we had a sculpture garden like this here - I would probably wander around there pretty often. There are so many sculptures that speak to me. I've seen Rodin's "Burghers of Calais" in Paris and like almost all the sculptures by Rodin I loved it. Such intricate work. The reflective Cones are incredible - I would have a heyday here with my camera. But my real favorite in this post is the fog - it's simply fabulous. I have no idea how the artist did it, but it is so beautiful. One day I will visit Australia, and Canberra will be on my list and if it's only to see the Sculpture Garden.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Carola Bartz: It is a wonderful space isn't it? And the fog sculpture enthralled both of us too. We spent a long time wandering around and through it. Some day I hope you do get here...

      Delete
  56. I love the sculpture garden with Rodin. It's beyond me how someone could make those things.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Rick Watson: It is beyond me too, but I am so very grateful to those it is NOT beyond.

      Delete
  57. My favourite is the fog sculpture. I've never seen anything like it before, I am very grateful that you shared it here.

    All the best Jan

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lowcarb team member ~ Jan: It is very special isn't it? And always changing.

      Delete
  58. What a place... the sculptures are lovely. The heads in the water are quite mystics.... a scary. The fog in these photos are beautiful.
    Hugs

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. orvokki: Wasn't the fog lovely? Mysterious and beautiful.

      Delete