Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Sunday, 10 September 2017

Sunday Selections #344: Out of the Shadows, Into the Lights 2017

Each Sunday I post photos under the title Sunday Selections. This meme was originally brought to us by  Kim, of Frogpondsrock, as an ongoing meme where participants could post previously unused photos languishing in their files.
 
The meme is now continued by River at Drifting through life.  The rules are so simple as to be almost non-existent.  Post some photos under the title Sunday Selections and link back to River.  Clicking on any of the photos will make them embiggen.

Like River I usually run with a theme. 
This week I am stretching the meme a little and posting (at some length) about a cause which is very dear to me.  Today, September 10th, is World Sucide Prevention Day, and the start of World Suicide Prevention Week.  I spend time in the dark places myself and know both how fast and easy the plummet to the bottom can be and how hard it is to climb out again. 


Most of you know I do voluntary work with Lifeline Australia, a telephone crisis line.  Almost everyone who rings those lines with thoughts of suicide has at least a degree of ambivalence.  I, and all the other volunteers, will work on that ambivalence to keep the caller safe for the moment/the day and to help them see and consider other options.   Lifeline believes that suicide is often preventable and that the start of the journey to safety can be only a phone call away.  It is often a long and painful journey but should never ever be one that people feel condemned to walk alone.

Here in Australia suicide is still the leading cause of death for people aged under 44.  More people die from suicide each year than are killed on the roads.  Sadly the numbers of people we lose to suicide are rising again.  Which, given that I suspect suicide is under reported, is scary.

Not only does suicide take its toll on our young, there are other groups who are over-represented in its tragic ranks including (but not limited to) our indigenous population, people with mental health issues, farmers, tradesmen, and the military.  We lose more of our veterans (and those still serving) to suicide than we do in combat. 

In 2011 Lifeline began  national suicide prevention walks - 'Out of the Shadows and into the Light'. The walks begin before dawn and continue into the growing light.  It remembers those lost and those bereaved by suicide, with an additional focus on raising awareness.  The symbolism of starting the walk in the dark and progressing into the light of a new day means a lot to me.  Some centres start their walk later (ten or eleven) to attract more people and publicity.  I can see why, but am glad that our walks start in the dark.

I don't think that all suicide is wrong, particularly given our euthanasia laws.  However, it is such a final decision that I hope it is not the first option considered or tried.  And, as a solution to a temporary problem, I do think it is wrong.  Right or wrong it is always a tragedy.  A tragedy for the person who had, or believed they had, no other options and a tragedy for those they leave behind.  And the ripples from that tragedy encompass a lot of people.  Research shows that each time someone suicides, there are up to 135 people affected.  In addition there is strong evidence that if someone close to you dies by suicide your own chances of taking that path are increased.  

I couldn't attend the first walk, but have gone on the subsequent walks. Which saw me heading off again before dawn this morning.  The dread disease slows me down, ensures my gait is uneven and is painful.  The issue is much more important than I am.    So I walked.  Slowly, at the back of the pack just as I did last year.  Stopping to take photos.

There were brief speeches.  Some of the names of those lost were read out - which I find moving.  No longer nameless, but identified and missed...  And an acknowledgement that there are names we do not know, which doesn't diminish their loss.

It was a chilly morning and there was frost and a little fog.   Come walk with me, through the cool dawn, into the hopeful light of a new day.

















RU OK day (September 14) is also celebrated in World Suicide Prevention Week.  A question we should be asking family, friends and colleagues every day.




Some services and links which may be useful for Australian readers include:
Lifeline 1311 14
Suicide Call Back Service


153 comments:

  1. Suicide has touched so many people in Australia, just last week a local young lad took his own life. My heart breaks for his family and friends. I am so grateful for the volunteer work that you do Sue with Lifeline. It can't be an easy thing to do, but I hope you realise it means a lot to know there is always someone there to talk to if ever needed.

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    1. CountryMum: I am so sorry to hear it has come close to you as well. It really is heartbreaking.

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  2. My son has lost more than a few friends to suicide. Bless you for the work you do in helping people see that there are other less final options.

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    1. mshatch: It almost seems like an epidemic doesn't it? I am proud to be a member of the Lifeline team. We don't always succeed, but we keep trying. And hoping.

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  3. I feel proud to "know" you, EC, as I do every time you post about this work you do, this important cause.
    New Zealand has one of the highest suicide rates in the world, and today 606 pairs of empty shoes have arrived at our Parliament, each pair representing someone who has committed suicide in the last year. The 'march' started 15 days ago, from each end of the country, and on the way the shoes were displayed in towns and cities where those people had lived. The collections started with 579 pairs of shoes, but sadly, 27 extra pairs were added after the Chief Coroner released new suicide figures during the roadshow.

    He waka eke noa (We are all in this together)

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    1. Alexia: We are indeed all in this together.
      I love the march of the empty shoes and will mention it to the organisers of the Out of the Shadows walk. I can see room for those empty shoes to be included in year year's event.

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  4. I often land in that dark place, too...a reason why I always wear a miner's lamp!

    It's very sad when one hears of a young person committing suicide...they've their whole life ahead of them...and, unfortunately, they've slipped beneath the radar, and the problems they had to contend with are discovered far too late.

    I hope you have a good week, EC. Take cae. Cuddles to your furry mate. :)

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    1. Lee: Lots of us spend time in the dark places, and the more we talk about it the more light we can shine in.
      I am sorry when I hear of anyone (regardless of age) who can see no other options. Mostly they are wrong.

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    2. I'm sorry to hear that Lee, I had no idea. The dark place is unknown to me personally, but I know people who spend time there.

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  5. Those are terribly sobering statistics, and a moving post. Not everyone can do what you at Lifeline do, so bless you all. I love the idea of this walk to honour and to remember and to raise awareness, and also the empty shoes march mentioned by Alexia. It makes it more personal for those who have yet to be touched by suicide themselves. Hugs, my friend.

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    1. jenny_o: The empty shoes march has had me thinking ever since I read Alexia's comment. Such a poignant and personal way to make the losses real...
      There were certainly tears this morning, but there were also fond memories.

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  6. I only know of one suicide, he was a friend who had been to Vietnam. Although I hadn't seen him since school days, I felt it. Cannot imagine how a family member would feel.

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    1. Sharon Quails: I have talked with those who have lost a family member to suicide. And wept with them too.

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  7. Here in United States we are slowly coming around to helping those with mental illness. But with our current President and adminstration I don't see much funding heading to our mental health...Thank you for sharing...Coffee is on

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    1. peppylady (Dora): We have more steps to take on the mental health front too. Big steps. I hope your current President and admin do see the need.

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  8. Sad statistics, in your post and in the comments. I do think that in certain cases, like terminal illness, suicide is the only way to go, but so many young people end their lives because "nobody understands them." Or so they think. You're doing an important job with that telephone Lifeline. Even it helped one person, it's one more who walked into the light.

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    1. Olga Godim: There are a lot of us on the phones, and hopefully lots of people who find the strength to keep going. Just the same the numbers of those who choose this permanent solution to temporary problems is growing.

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    2. Suicide being a "permanent solution to temporary problems" is frightening!!

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    3. fishducky: It is. And that permanent solution causes problems (big problems) for those left behind.

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  9. Such a valuable, life-saving cause! You do good work. And nice shots too.

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    1. Lady Fi: Thank you. I do believe it is important and sadly necessary work.

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  10. Dear EC
    You and others like you are doing such an important job. Raising awareness and just talking about it is so vital too. It is an awful thing at any time, but particuarly when it happens to someone you know and has so many repercussions.
    Thank goodness for people like you.
    Best wishes
    Ellie

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    1. Ellie Foster: We are getting better about talking about suicide here. Which I think is excellent. Things hidden in the dark have a nasty habit of festering and growing.

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  11. thank goodness for people like you who are able to take up the challenges of the Lifeline work.. thanks for your post. A very moving way of getting the message out.

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    1. Anna: The people who face the challenges, sometimes day after day for years, are our callers. I am frequently awed at their resilience. And thank you.

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  12. How long is the walk? It looks like a fair distance.
    My son's partner (the psycho shrew) has two sisters who suicided, I worry that one day she may do the same.
    I have RUOK marked on my calendar.

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    1. River: Her chances of suicide went up exponentially when not one but two family members took that path. I hope she can avoid it.
      It is a fair distance (though I don't know how far). It was made further because there are no buses available in the suburbs on a Sunday at the time we finished the walk so I walked into town, which was like doing another walk. And when we got to my suburb there was another kilometre to walk. I am a very tired puppy tonight.

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  13. I admire your fortitude in getting out of bed early on a cold day and then walking so far when it is challenging. Well done, you

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    1. kylie: I am almost always up early, but don't usually leave the house till much later. The cold was less of a problem for me too.

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  14. Thank you for the volunteer work you do to help others who may be thinking of suicide.

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    1. Linda Starr: Thank you. It is a privilege to be invited into people's lives.

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  15. Starting at dawn and walking into the light - powerful.
    That is really scary there are more suicides than deaths from car accidents.

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    1. Alex J. Cavanaugh: Car accident deaths get more publicity and I suspect that programs to prevent/reduce the numbers get more funding. We are getting better though. Slowly.

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  16. I have never personally known anyone who took their own life but I do believe that each of my grandchildren has lost a friend or classmate to suicide. Someone is failing to teach them that there is ALWAYS hope. It is very frightening.

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    1. Granny Annie: Frightening and heart-breaking.

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  17. Such important work, EC. Thank you for your efforts to help others!

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    1. Marie Smith: I am so glad that so many of us try.

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  18. You are doing wonderful work, it is very much needed. And getting up early and walking in the cold strengthens everyone's resolve. My cousin in Canberra does similar volunteer work. It would be funny if you knew each other. I won't say her name but initials are MD.

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    1. Shammickite: I wonder whether your cousin and I do know each other? The symbolism of walking into the growing light is incredibly powerful for me - and I really don't feel the cold much at all.

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  19. In the US, 22 veterans commit suicide every day. War takes less lives than PTST. Depression is on the uptake and bullying has gone viral. Bless you for all you do to save lives.

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    1. Starting Over, Accepting Changes - Maybe: I am sorry to hear that our sorry statistics are echoed over there. Sorry and unsurprised.

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  20. I feel very proud to know you. I am sure it was not easy but thank your for your effort.

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  21. You touch my heart and soul, my friend. I too am proud to know you. You do so much and are inspiring on so many levels. Thank you for sharing and most of all, for caring.

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    1. Mason Canyon: Thank you. Growing up my family condemned my 'butter-soft' heart. I am glad to have found a niche where it is useful.

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  22. Hi EC - suicide is such a sad thing for all concerned, as you've written it up here. We don't necessarily understand the reasons why ... possibly War, leading to PTST, then despair at not controlling life - and so it goes - they believe it will be a relief: it's just most definitely not for those left behind.

    I admire the Services that help those who will put their hand up, and those who encourage others to do so ... your Walk "Out of the Shadows, Into the Light" - an excellent way of highlighting suicide and being with people who offer help to talk about it and hopefully prevent it.

    Congratulations on being out there - cheers Hilary

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    1. Hilary Melton-Butcher: How right you are. That relief is very one sided. However the pain is unevenly shared too. Lots of question, very few answers, except a firm belief that reaching out is a starting point.

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  23. It took my wife twenty years to start understanding my depression. I've learned to help...by not trying to hide it...I tell her when I'm in a valley, and she gives me a good, long hug

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    1. Author R. Mac Wheeler: I am glad that you are helping your wife by not hiding your pain. It can't have been an easy step for you.
      And I so hope that Irma's damage is less than predicted. Holding you in my heart.

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  24. I am in awe of you, and thank you for everything that you do. I know others have benefited greatly from your compassion (including me).

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    1. River Fairchild: Put that awe away. I am so very grateful to have found your snarky self in the blogosphere. It isn't one sided at all.

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  25. Such a tragic but beautiful theme for your photos.

    Love,
    Janie

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    1. Janie Junebug: A sadly necessary theme. I hope Irma is leaving you alone too.

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  26. Replies
    1. Bill: Thank you - but believe me I get more than I give.

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  27. This strikes a little too close to home...but thank you for sharing all the same.

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    1. Robert Bennett: I am so sorry to hear you are affected. Too many people know this pain. Way too many.

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  28. The suicides I known about are young males both with problems with their partners after a break up unable to face life without them but is was something that may hove not mattered in later life if they had chosen to live, so very sad.
    You are doing a wonderful job people like you keep the clock ticking.
    Merle.........

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    1. Merlesworld: Relationship woes mostly fall into the temporary problems area don't they? And ending your life because of them is so very sad. For everyone.

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  29. I know you are very humble about this EC, but I too am proud to know you. Yes you are one of many as you say, but I applaud you very loudly, and all those who do this.

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  30. The world needs more people like you. You have a good heart and I admire you for what you do. And I thank you as well. I have called the crisis line several times here in Canada and don't know what I would have done if someone hadn't of answered the phone.

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    1. Birdie: I am so glad that you reached out to the crisis line. It must have taken immense courage - and I am happy that they were there for you, and am sure that the people you reached were glad too.

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  31. ! want to thank you for all you do. Behind every comment you leave and every post. I have an image of a caring individual. Thank you.

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    1. Martin Kloess: Thank you. I most definitely care. It sometimes isn't enough, but I care just the same.

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  32. Thank you, EC, for this compassionate post. Our inner pain can be agonizing, but the context too often is the structures of an uncaring society.

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    1. catmint: Thank you. And yes, on the uncaring (or seemingly uncaring) society.

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  33. The symbolism of this walk, from the dark into the light, is incredible moving. Thank you for volunteering with Lifeline, for being a light in the dark and for telling us about it.

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    1. Carola Bartz: Thank you. I know you have done very similar work.

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  34. Thank you for telling us about it. Sounds like a wonderful cause to volunteer.

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    1. Nas: Thank you. It is a cause very dear to my heart.

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  35. You are involved in so many things that can make a difference in someone's life, and I'm thrilled to hear about your work. I think suicide is one of those tragedies that people are sort of afraid to talk about, and when it happens, people don't know what to say to the persons affected. My mom died by suicide when I was just 17 years old, so I definitely know how it can affect families and friends. Thanks for shining a powerful light on this topic. Hugs...RO

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    1. RO: I am so sorry. You do indeed know the impact. I have sadly often talked with people who have lost family and friends to suicide and I hurt for them and I hurt with them. Hugs.

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  36. I have known about your work in this area for a long time, EC. I am so glad you shared this walk. I felt like I was there with you. Sending you big hugs.

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    1. DJan: Thank you for the hugs - which are returned. I hope I don't go on too much about my volunteer work. Just because it is important to me doesn't mean that it is to others.

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  37. What a moving series of photos! My brother in law's father and brother both took their own lives and now he lives with some survivor guilt, that he was able to weather the storms of depression that they were unable to weather.

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    1. Anne in the kitchen: Survivor guilt is a vicious beastie. And resilience a mysterious beast. Some people seem to be blessed with more of it than others.

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  38. What a scene EC, beautiful cold air and the people. Fantastic photos.

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    1. Bob Bushell: Thank you. Beautiful cold air, and beautiful people, filled with love and caring.

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  39. Praise for you in raising the awareness of suicide.

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    1. Treey: Thank you. It is a cause very dear to my heart.

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  40. I had no idea more people under the age of 44 (in Australia) die from suicide than are killed on the roads – that is a shocking statistic. It makes me afraid for my grandchildren both in the UK and in Australia.
    I’ve also spent some time in a very dark place, thankfully it was many years ago, and I’m fine now although I know how easy it would be to slip that way again.
    Thank you for taking me with you on the walk, I only wish I was there in person.

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    1. Barbara Fisher: It is a shocking statistic. And suicide being the leading cause of death for those under 44 horrifies me. The dark places are so much easier to slip into than to climb out again aren't they?

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  41. I have never been in that dark place but I know people who have. Important work, I applaud you! and those who work selflessly to give people reasons not to consider this option. In my community every year so many teenagers and young adults commit suicide only because they have not done as well as expected in some exam or other - it's devastating!

    Your photos are poignant and uplifting, I too love the symbolism inherent in starting from dark and moving into the light. Reminds me of the prayer in the Upanishads - asato ma sad gamaya, tamaso ma jyotir gamaya, mrityur ma amritam gamaya (from ignorance lead me to the Truth, from darkness lead me to light, from death lead me to immortality) Beautiful, and a truly moving post EC. Thank you.

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    1. Nilanjana Bose: That prayer is beautiful. Thank you. Decided that death is the only option because of an exam is a truly dreadful concept, and will haunt me today.

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  42. Kudos for continuing to shine awareness on this, EC.
    One would have to feel so completely alone to contemplate suicide. It's got to be awful.
    Hope your day is filled with sunshine.

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    1. Sandra Cox: When I seriously contemplated suicide I believed that those who were dear to me would be much better off without me. Alone is a part of it, but not all of it by any means. Depression is a skilled and practised liar.

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    2. I'm so sorry, EC. I'm glad you're in a different place now.
      Your definition of depression is spot on.

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  43. It is such a desperate thing to do. People who get to such a dark part of their lives really need the help to turn around their lives. I lost my husband on August 17 still very hard and fresh in my mind but I go on. I figure it was God's will and if I don't go on then I am going against my faith. Plus I am left so that I can relate to everyone that he was here, we loved one another so that his existence meant something. If I don't do that it would be such a waste truly. I know he is here with me just wish the signs could be stronger perhaps with time. I did have a clock fly off my dresser and for that I smiled and said thank you. I will pray for all people to come out into the light from the dark and know that no matter what life is worth living and life must go on. Our darling cat Sid revived very quickly and began eating like a horse and I know that animals see spirits so I know he has seen him and is now content because he really loved his Papa. It give me strength and hope and love to go on.

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    1. Rasma Raisters: I am so sorry to hear you lost your husband. I know how dear he was to you. I am so glad that you have Sid with you, and hope that you continue to find the strength and hope. Hugs.

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  44. Its dreadful when the body is wearing out and illness of any description really is horrible. Amazingly there was a time when I would have considered the final countdown but instead? I wrote a lot of passionate Star Trek filled with anguish and logic of course published at my blog. I actually fed off my emotionalism when I was close to the edge writing Sci Fi reviews of TV shows and the result was magic, I say. Sadly never once did I mention how I really felt or what was wrong - my stubborn trekkie pride would never ever allow it. Even today. So YES, if you know someone who's suffering or in pain extend a hand and share the time to let them know you care. We're all h-u-m-a-n.

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    1. Spacer Guy: I am also good at concealing just how bad I am feeling. I am glad that you found a solution which worked for you, and can only echo your final sentences.

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  45. Thank-you EC for your efforts to help those in need.

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    1. Sue in Italia/In the Land of Cancer: Thank you. There are lots of us, which I find encouraging. Very encouraging.

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  46. So many need to see the dawn break on their darkness. Bless you and all thouse who took part.

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    1. only slightly confused: Some days dawn can feel a very, very long way away.

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  47. Its a great cause. Looks like a nice group of people walking too. I couldn't do what you do on the phoneline. I'd be afraid I'd say something wrong and people would kill themselves as a result. You're very brave to do the phoneline.

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    1. Strayer: It is a great cause. Most of what we do is listening and we have very, very good training. And are required to keep our skills current.

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  48. Thank you. Bless you.
    Sorry you couldn't make it there this year. Your spirit is truly lifesaving.
    Love to you.
    PS Our Out of the Darkness will be on 10/14 this year.

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    1. Rawknrobyn: Thank you. I did walk this year - and so far have only missed the first. I hope to keep that record too.
      I will be cheering your walk on a little later in the year.

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  49. Thanks for speaking out, EC. Suicide is a dirty business, and while it should be a providence for some, particularly euthanasia cases, it too often looks like the only option to people who can't see clearly. I've had to help many people out of holes. I'm too glad to have been there when I was.

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    1. John Wiswell: I am glad and unsurprised to hear you are a lifesaver. We need more of them. Many more.

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  50. So much darkness, and so important to hang on to the deep understanding that there is also light and to remember that it really is "okay to say you're not". Except, as you say, with euthanasia ... if only my mum had had that option just a few months ago, instead of taking the heartbreaking path that became her only choice. I wish life had been kinder to her. And I hope life stays kind to you EC

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    1. Kim: I am glad that evil blogger let you in today. My father also took that heartbreaking painful path. How I wish times had been different.
      Hugs to you.

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  51. Such an inspiring and compassionate post, stronger together is so important, even more so these days. That's so very sad to hear about the great number of suicides and how it seems to be growing in higher numbers everywhere. It's especially hard to understand how many children fall prey to suicides. Spreading the awareness is important.

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    1. Karen S.: I am so glad that more and more we are able to talk about suicide and not keep it hidden. Things hidden in the dark fester and grow.

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  52. I love the idea you start in the dark and walk into the light.
    Have a day filled with sparkle.
    Hugs,

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    1. Sandra Cox: That symbolism is wonderful isn't it? A busy day ahead but hopefully with sunshine and sparkles. I hope yours is wonderful too.

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  53. Thank you, companionable Friend <3

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    1. Cloudia: And thank you to you too, oh sister over the sea.

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  54. I am so amazed by your perseverance to walk! So kind of you to help with such a worthy cause when you have challenges yourself! Beautiful morning to walk too

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    1. Kim Standard: It is a cause which is very dear to me. You are right - it was a beautiful morning. Bonus.

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  55. We're going to have to switch your initials from EC to BC (Big Cat). Heh heh.

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    1. Sandra Cox: Smiling here. Today (and often) my t-shirt features a big cat. Love them.

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  56. I am grateful to you and all the other workers and volunteers. You are stupendous to walk and volunteer in spite of your own discomfort. Suicide has touched my family too often. It is devastating to the survivors. Thank you so much for what you do.

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    1. Myrna R.: I am so sorry you have been caught up in the tsunami of people affected.

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  57. I thank you for the work that you do!

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  58. RU OK Day is so important. Such a simple question can save a life.

    Thanks for visiting my blog! :)

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    1. Chrys Fey: RU OK is a truly wonderful initiative. And visiting your blog was a pleasure. I am still pondering the question you posed.

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  59. "I don't think that all suicide is wrong, particularly given our euthanasia laws. However, it is such a final decision that I hope it is not the first option considered or tried. And, as a solution to a temporary problem, I do think it is wrong. Right or wrong it is always a tragedy. A tragedy for the person who had, or believed they had, no other options and a tragedy for those they leave behind." - I couldn't agree more. You and the other volunteers do an amazing job and I love your 'butter-soft' heart for it Xx

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    1. All Consuming: Thank you. Your heart is no harder than mine - and I love you for it too.

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  60. Hey EC, just stopping by to say hello! Hugs...RO

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    1. RO: Thank you. I hope your week has been kind to you.

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  61. Some photographs were taken REALLY early there. I don't miss those days at all. Then I remember - I DO get up really early.

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    1. Treey: I am an early riser, but am not usually out before dawn.

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  62. I admire you for the work you do!
    Bless you!

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    1. Caterina: Thank you. I am frequently awed at impressed at the resilience of the callers and get a great deal more than I give.

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  63. i am amazed how do you manage to do all this my friend!
    beautiful photos!

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  64. Bless you for the volunteer work you do with suicide prevention. I've told you that before, but it's always worth repeating. What I've never told you is that I survived a suicide attempt when I was 15 years old. Although at the time, I honestly believed it was the only way to escape from a horribly abusive situation, I'm grateful every day for the doctors who saved me and gave me the opportunity to rise above my past. YOU, sweet lady, are saving people before they get to that point. So again, bless you.

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    1. Susan: I am so glad you were saved. So very glad. I believe that most people who contemplate/attempt/complete suicide just want the pain to stop and cannot see any other way. And I am grateful to belong to a group which tries to help.

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  65. You, my dear, are a truly beautiful person. Walking is difficult for you, and despite your troubles, you take time to walk for, to inspire, to talk to, those struggling with mental issues.

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    1. neena maiya (guyana gyal): How lovely to see you. I have been wondering how you are. Thank you, but believe me, I get a lot more from my volunteering than I give.

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  66. The start of the journey to safety can be only a phone call away... So true. I had no idea suicide could ever be the leading cause of death in any country. :(

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    1. Blue Grumpster: That is a gob-smackingly horrible statistic isn't it? And I suspect from what Alexia was saying it is also true in New Zealand.

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  67. I'm amazed at the statistics, I had no idea it was so high in young people. As I'm sure I've mentioned before, my brother tried to take his own life when he was at uni. Thank you for being there for people like my brother.

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    1. LL Cool Joe: I did know about your brother, and am very glad he survived. Those statistics are awful aren't they?

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  68. Hope your weekend sparkles and a rainbow is spotted.
    Hugs,

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    1. Sandra Cox: It is a bright frosty morning here - and yes, the day is sparkling. I hope your weekend is wonderous.

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  69. Like others, I am stunned by the statistics. Hope your physical pain is mitigated a bit by the emotional lift you may be providing to someone within your sphere of influence.

    Thank you for a very important post!

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    1. Wally: The pain is a given, but if I am going to hurt anyway I might as well hurt for a good reason.

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  70. The stats are startling. We just took a class on this (teachers are required to go), and I was surprised at how much I learned. It was also very surprising to see how many suicides take place among our youth each and every day. :(

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    1. mail4rosey: I hope you found the class helpful. I don't know whether our teachers are required to take them - but hope so.

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  71. Yes - having lost one friend to suicide, I wish I had said RUOK? Thank you for the work you do.

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    1. Lynn: So many regret, the world over. Hugs.

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  72. Those are not good statistics. I think we do need to highlight this and talk about it more. Mental health affects so many and it is so often pushed into the shadows.
    I think the them of this walk is excellent.
    The work you do is to be applauded.
    We have the Samaritans organisation here in the UK that are a very good and available for people to phone in when they are in a very low place and those that need to talk.
    Lifeline sounds very similar.

    I enjoyed seeing your photographs.

    My good wishes

    All the best Jan

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    1. Lowcarb team member ~Jan: Thank you. The Samaritans and Lifeline are indeed very similar. And sadly necessary.

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  73. Thank you so much for all of your work on this worthy cause. You are an inspiration. I can't get over the statistics you shared about the suicide rate in Australia. Last week someone I went through high school with took his life. He was always smiling and laughing, so the sign that says- it's okay to say you're not really hit home.

    Thanks and hugs!
    ~Jess

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    1. DMS ~Jess: The statistics are frightening aren't they? Really, really frightening. How I wish that more of us could speak up when we are not ok, but for complicated reasons (cultural and gender related among others) it often isn't possible. And we all lose.
      I am so sorry to hear about your school friend.

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  74. The more we talk about suicide, the more people will have the knowledge that it is a temporary but permanent solution for what will pass. I'm glad they have better treatment for depression.

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    1. Ann Bennett: I agree. We need to talk about the hard things (including suicide). When we hide the difficult things we don't diminish them at all.

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