Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Sunday, 10 December 2017

Sunday Selections #357

Sunday Selections was originally brought to us by Kim, of Frogpondsrock, as an ongoing meme where participants could post previously unused photos languishing in their files.
 
The meme is now continued by River at Drifting through life.  The rules are so simple as to be almost non-existent.  Post some photos under the title Sunday Selections and link back to River.  Clicking on any of the photos will make them embiggen.  River is having a blog break at the moment (and will be missed), so I am (hopefully) keeping the meme warm in her absence.  


Like River I usually run with a theme.  This week I am taking you back to our National Gallery.  They have a special show on at the moment - 'Hyper Real' and of course we had to go.  The link I attached to the words Hyper Real takes you to a slideshow from the exhibition.


As you bought the tickets staff warned that there was nudity and that some images might be challenging.

I don't know that challenging was the word I would use, but I did find a lot of the exhibition beautiful but very, very sad.

So I will probably only show a few of the sculptures this week.


 This was just outside the entrance to the exhibition, and somehow I neglected to record the artist's details as I did (shame on me) on the next sculpture.

Some of the sculptures I wandered around and around, taking photos from lots of angles.





 Hyper real was no exaggeration.  Sometimes I had to look more than once to see whether I was looking at a sculpture or a person.  The first comes from Duane Hanson's Two Workers installation.


The second is Caroline by Daniel Firman. 




This next one is Embrace by Marc Sijan.





And another by the same artist titled 'Cornered'.





Just one more today.  This one is by Sun Yuan and Peng Yu and is called Old People's Home.  The electric wheelchairs ran in a carefully choreographed fashion.  They didn't run into each other - but sometimes spectators had to step out of the way.









Do you see why I found it sad?  Beautiful, and very skilful, but my melancholy mood stayed for days. 

In my usual fashion I took many, many photos (some of which are less than stellar) and we can explore the exhibition further in later posts if you are interested.

138 comments:

  1. It runs the gamut... beautiful, heartbreaking, eerie, sad, creepy. I tip my hat to you. I don't think I could have stayed in there for very long. Very emotionally charged atmosphere.

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    1. River Fairchild: It did run the gamut. It was definitely a moving exhibition and one that I am not sorry we went to. Not certain I am strong enough to go back though.

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  2. They do appear to be real people. I find it melancholy, too.

    Love,
    Janie

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  3. I agree. These sculptures of people look so real.

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    1. Jamie Ghione: Very real. And many were life sized too.

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  4. If I had not read these are sculptures, I would think - with no hesitation - that some were real people.

    I would feel a profound melancholy as well.

    I am so impressed with the talent of those sculpors!

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    1. Caterina: I was awed. And the sculptors came from all over the world, France, Serbia, the US, Australia, China...

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  5. Sad but profound! They give one pause for sure. Thank you for sharing.

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    1. Marie Smith: I would love to have been brave enough to ask other viewers who they felt.

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  6. Some of those are incredibly real. Clever to have the wheelchairs move.

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    1. Alex J. Cavanaugh: The wheelchair dance was very clever. It must have taken a lot of work.

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  7. Yes, melancholy is apt.
    But I wonder if our sadness is not, in fact, guilt that this exhibition is no different from what we pass in our streets on a daily basis...
    Thank you for showing us something we probably didn't want to see.

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    1. dinahmow: You may have a point. I am still thinking about your comment and wondering. Some of the other sculptures weren't things we see on a regular basis, but were still very moving. Empathy is a very mixed bag.

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  8. I must learn to let the melancholy go quicker. Replacing it with a worthy pleasure or beauty seems to help.... "Hugs"

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    1. Cloudia: Sometimes melancholy is appropriate. And I stay with it, until it is ready to leave.

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  9. Hard to believe they are sculptures, except how can each and every one be so melancholy. Not even a manically laughing person careening in a wheel chair.

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    1. Joanne Noragon: Now why didn't I think of the maniacal laugher?

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  10. If you were to describe this art to me without pictures, I wouldn't have the slightest desire to see these pieces. Yet I was transfixed by your excellent captures. Remarkable...

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    1. Bill: It was a remarkable exhibition. I don't think anyone could have gone and not had their heart strings tugged at least once.

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  11. very sad and realistic and thought provoking I will soon be one of those old folks

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    1. Linda Starr: I hope to be the maniacal laugher that Joanne referred to.

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  12. I am so impressed with the ability of the artists to capture emotions in such graphic detail. I especially love the hugging couple. Thank you for the three different views of it. And yes, I can certainly see why the melancholy feeling lasted for days. Please share more, EC.

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    1. DJan: The hugging couple were incredible weren't they? And the woman in the corner tugged at my heart. Did you notice her feet?

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  13. "Melancholy" is certainly the word...life can be, far too often, melancholy.

    I hope the week ahead treats you kindly, EC....cuddles to Jazz. :)

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    1. Lee: There are worse emotions than melancholy. Much worse. I too hope this week is gentle and kind - and for you and your furry overlords.

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  14. Very dark and melancholy, indeed. They are difficult to look at. But wow, incredibly realistic and detailed.

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    1. Birdie: I knew that they would be realistic - but hadn't realised just how realistic. Or how connected and moved I would feel.

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  15. Wow! They look so real. An incredible collection of sculptures but I do agree they are a little dark and melancholy.

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    1. CountryMum: That they are - but they got me thinking which is never a bad thing.

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  16. Fantastic EC. I am in love with your statues. Absolutely stunning.

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    1. Bob Bushell: Thank you. They are truly incredible aren't they?

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  17. Melancholia is human eh. It looks like an interesting exhibition. The one with older folks struck me as odd. Where are women?

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    1. Ann Bennett: You are right, and I am ashamed to say I didn't notice at the time. Perhaps the women were at home caring for themselves...

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    2. It is not for me to interpret the sculpture but I notice a few of the men are representative of different religions and at least one is clergy which could be harder to achieve with statues of women. Could the sculptor be saying that we all end the same way regardless of how we have identified?

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    3. kylie: I noticed the different religions too. And sadly that would indeed be harder to depict with women. You have a point that we will all age, but I do hope not to end in a wheelchair and solitary.

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    4. excellent point! I was only thinking about aging and death

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    5. kylie: The concept of healthy aging is high in my mind.

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  18. These sculpture pieces are so very life-like. The figures embracing were especially amazing to me. Thank you for sharing. x

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  19. I love the works and I look forward to seeing more. They, one in particular, reminds of some art we saw in Mykonos.

    https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-YGNj2T4ZBAc/WTdwQknywbI/AAAAAAAAlF8/HzXTudb8uCsfORxCn8elJWiTLSXspOwJQCLcB/s1600/Mykonos%2B%252817%2529.JPG

    and

    https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-yIm2tW8fp7c/WTdwQpEaygI/AAAAAAAAlF4/krRD6t6bMtYBt19uwpfPCp9sZOtZksAgQCLcB/s1600/Mykonos%2B%252816%2529.JPG

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    1. Andrew: It the first one wasn't by Daniel Firman I would be very, very surprised. Perhaps he has done a series of them. Hyper Real is going to be on until mid February. Perhaps you could see it?

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  20. Yes, they would have left me melancholic too.

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    1. donna baker: They did, but I am glad I went. And an exhibition which stays with me so insistently is rare.

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    1. Starting Over, Accepting Changes - Maybe: I didn't see creepiness in this selection though there were a couple I haven't (yet) shown that were. Definitely sad though.

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  22. Agree. Very well done but very sad, too.

    Greetings from London.

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    1. A Cuban in London: It was not at all what I was expecting to feel when we went. And the realism was incredible.

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  23. Do please show us more.
    They are astonishing and yes, sad. All of the commenters above have summed up the feelings they evoke very well.
    I wondered many things - why did the old men all have long white beards? were they from a particular country or racial group? and why was one holding a whip? The old woman in the corner was my favourite (was there a pun intended in the title - feet, corns...?)
    Fascinating, and brilliant!

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    1. Alexia: I suspect the old men had long white beards to emphasize their venerable age. When himself was in China people wanted selfies with him and his (very large) white beard.
      I loved woman in the corner. For some reason the feet on a number of sculptures drew my attention. There are close ups of others too.
      It was an amazing exhibition. I saw what I expected (pretty much) but felt a great deal more.

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  24. They look so real! And I agree they are sad, especially Cornered and the old men in wheelchairs. The Hug looks very emotional and makes me want to know their story.

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    1. River: They look incredibly real don't they? There were a LOT of stories I wanted to know as I wandered around. And a few I didn't. Definitely didn't.

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  25. Wow. So real, these are chilling. I don't think I could've stomached the whole exhibit.
    Thank you for sharing, though. It's brilliant.

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    1. Rawknrobyn: Emotions were high, but I am really glad we went.

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  26. I think I would have found it very challenging... some themes we don't want to think about too much... very talented sculptors.

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    1. Anna: There are some other sculptures which I have not (yet) shared which were even more confronting. And also sad. The talent was incredible wasn't it?

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  27. Can see why you found it sad as I did looking at your photos.
    Wonderful on the other hand.

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    1. Margaret-whiteangel: It was both of those things.

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  28. Dear EC
    A very challenging exhibition, but an important one as it makes us contemplate what it is to be human. Sad, definitely - a lot of the figures looked so lonely and defeated. Melancholy too. Incredibly talented artists but I would have found it difficult because the figures were so real.
    Thank you for sharing.
    Best wishes
    Ellie

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    1. Ellie Foster: I found it beautiful and rewarding despite the difficulties. Some of the sculptures were definitely designed to make us think about what it is to be human.

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  29. Definitely a very unusual exhibit to see. The talent is undeniable, but it is a bit sad, I agree.

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    1. mail4rosey: I am so glad we went, despite the melancholy.

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  30. They look so real! And I agree they are sad, especially Cornered and the old men in wheelchairs. The Hug looks very emotional and makes me want to know their story.
    The old men in wheelchairs and the people in cardboard boxes are especially sad, even more so because they are so true to life. I can really see why you would come away feeling more than a little blue.

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    1. Barbara Fisher: Art which makes me 'feel' is by my own definition 'good art'. And feel I did.

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  31. I'm definitely interested in seeing more. These sculptures are incredible - so realistic. How lucky you are to live within access to so much art. Thanks for sharing.

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    1. Myrna R.: We are lucky. And make a conscious effort to take advantage of that luck.

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  32. These are so cool! Do you have an actual name for the Gallery that I could look up? My wife and I adore museums and art installations, so it would be nice to have a goal if/when I ever got down there.

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    1. Robert Bennett: The Australian National Gallery is its name. And when/if you get down here there are LOTS of things I think you and your wife would enjoy. The National Museum (also its name) is special too.

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  33. Incredibly skilled, and I can see why it'd make you melancholy. I'm a bit saddened just seeing it all in photos. In person, I think I'd cry. Wow.

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  34. Congratulations EC. You stayed the course and photographed it all. I don't know if I coud've done it. Thank you for your kind words on my blog post about Grant last week. Blessings Jo

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    1. Jo: It really was a worthwhile visit, despite the emotions it triggered.
      I am so sorry for your loss. Be kind to yourself. And allow others to be kind to you too.

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  35. "Corner" really tugged at my heartstrings!! There, but for the grace of God, go I...

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  36. Hi EC - how very fascinating ... I'd find it sad too - and I do looking at it via your photos ... but would love to know and see more of the exhibits and exhibition - cheers Hilary

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    1. Hilary Melton-Butcher: It was one of the most moving exhibitions I have been to at the National Gallery. Which surprised me a little. More photos will follow.

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  37. What an amazing exhibit. I can see why it left you feeling melancholy. The sculptures are so lifelike it is hard to believe they aren't real. The moments are real and people have genuine expressions. The viewer is really pulled into the scene and the emotions. Very powerful.
    ~Jess

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    1. DMS ~Jess: Thank you. It was indeed powerful. That hyper reality was more than just appearances.

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  38. Wow, if you hadn't written that these are sculptures, I would have thought they were real human beings. Hypnotic! Particularly moved by the cardboard box one and Cornered. Very poignant. Of course I'd love to see more.

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    1. Nilajana Bose: They were exaggerating when they described it as hyper-real were they? And I will show more later.

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  39. These are incredibly realistic sculptures. That would add to the melancholy feeling for me. And I don't think I could have stayed for more than a few seconds in the room of people in wheelchairs. Too close to what I saw at my father's nursing home, including him. But I'm so glad you shared them with us. Looking forward (in an artistic sense) to more.

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    1. jenny_o: The Nursing Home sculpture jumped on my buttons too. However, so did a few of the others. Beautiful, but...

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  40. Amazing sculptures! I'd love to see them close up in detail, and I get why you find them so moving too. Thank you for showing them to us dearie X

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    1. All Consuming: It was lovely to be able to walk all round most of them and get very different perspectives.

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  41. Once again you've enlightened me on something new, EC. I wasn't there, but this art seems so lifelike in pictures, so I can just imagine what it was like for you and others who were able to see this in person. Truly amazing! Hugs...

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    1. RO: It was INCREDIBLY lifelike. And many of the sculptures were lifesize too.

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  42. I found these sculptures almost unbelievable and I feel my reaction ...had I seen them in the flesh so to speak....would have been very much like yours. Beautifully done but some were quite distressing. I am so glad though that you shared them with us.

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    1. Mimsie: I knew they would be realistic (the title of the exhibition was the giveaway) but hadn't realised just how realistic they would be. Including some which weren't based on anything real...

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    1. Granny Annie: Welcome back - I hope you are feeling better. And definitely OMG.

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    1. Sandra Cox: I didn't find them depressing exactly, but they certainly pushed a button or six.

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    2. I found the folks in wheelchairs depressing. It reminds me of nursing homes where you walk in and see a bunch of residents in wheelchairs with looks of hopelessness on their faces.

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    3. The others sculptures, not so much:) And they were very well executed.

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    4. Sandra Cox: I think nursing homes often ARE depressing. No arguments from me. Too many people left isolated...

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  45. Excellent work, but as you say, both sad and beautiful.

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  46. Dear EC, I wonder if this exhibit will come to the United States, and if so, what cities it will tour. Like you, I found most of the photographs sad and I can see why they haunted you for days.

    But one thing that also comes to me as I look is the resourcefulness of human beings. The resilience. The ability to comfort one another and the great drive to be realized in life and to enter its journey whole-heartedly. I see that in the wheelchairs.

    And yet I know that so many people in the United States alone are lonely this season as they lie homeless in cardboard boxes or await some visitor who never comes to their nursing home.

    Life seems so unfair sometimes and it seems we can do so little to correct the unfairness. But always I remember a card I had once that said, "Start with one." And that is all I can do. Find one person that needs a heart-lift. One who is a part of All Oneness.

    Peace. And oh, by the way, I would like to see more photographs of the exhibit. Thank you for asking!

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    1. Dee: Everything starts with one doesn't it? Small steps, slow steps, important steps. And emotions are often a good springboard.
      Hugs.

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  47. These blew my mind! If you had simply posted the pictures, I would have thought these were real people. Amazing.

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    1. cleemckenzie: They were that good weren't they? Even knowing that they were sculptures I got tricked a few times.

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  48. I had to look at these a few times. I didn't realize it was art at first.

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  49. Wow! What an exhibition! Looks so real! I agree, beautifully done, but sad too! Big Hugs!

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    1. Magic Love Crow: Thank you. So much skill, so much talent, so much tugging on the heart.

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  50. What an unusual exhibit...The figures look so real I think I'd have been apologizing to them if I'd got in the way of those wheelchairs!

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    1. Molly Bon: Yes. And feeling a bit like a voyeur as I gazed at some of the other tableaus.

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  51. Amazing how realistic those sculptures are - all of humanity is there.

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    1. Lady Fi: Yes. And in some of the other sculptures, a very different humanity.

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  52. They look real, EC and I can see why the works would inspire melancholy and yet even your photos, I went back several times, to look closer at each.

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    1. Strayer: We spent hours there - and revisited some sculptures several times.

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  53. Is that first piece of art Leonard Nimoy...?

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    1. John Wiswell: I don't think so, but does have some of his look.

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  54. That looks very interesting. I have seen similar individual installations but never many.

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    1. Andrew Maclaren-Scott: Our gallery owns a couple of hyper real sculptures but I am grateful that someone had the idea to stage a bigger exhibition. Pieces in it came from round the world and organising it cannot have been a small task.

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  55. FAbulous sculptures, moving yet very sad

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    1. Margaret Adamson: They are both of those things.

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  56. I really still can't decide if those people are real. The wheelchair room is rather frightening. I might end up like that. I don't know the future. The art inspires melancholy but also fear.

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    1. Shammickite: It certainly involved emotion didn't it? Lots of emotion. I don't remember another exhibition which was so charged with it.

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  57. I've been looking, and re-looking at these images. They are so powerful. I like the way the wheelchair gentlemen seem to be the same person and yet the way we imagine his life story and world view is so dependent on clothing and props

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    1. Kim: Don't judge a book by its cover? Except that we do. You have given me yet another reason to think about the exhibition. Thank you.

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  58. Beautiful.
    Heartbreaking.
    Reality.
    Absolutely amazing. xx

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  59. Wow I had a shock I thought the first sculpture was a photo of your partner!

    I can't get over how realistic they all look. Very clever but very creepy too. I think it may feel like being in a room with a load of dead people!

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    1. LL Cool Joe: Some of them did feel dead, and others most definitely alive. And they were the ones which tugged at my heart.

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  60. Absolutely stunning - and i do understand the melancholy (can only imagine what was there that you didn't post). There was, however, something so lovely and redemptive in "Embrace". Thank you for sharing that...

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    1. daisyfae: Embrace was truly lovely, and there were others too. Most had a sting in the loveliness though. And I will post more from the exhibition later.

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  61. I've never seen anything quite like it.
    Thanks for sharing your photographs.

    All the best Jan

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    1. Lowcarb team member ~Jan: I haven't seen anything like it either.

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  62. The sculptures are like real people. They have their own story.
    The exhibition has a strong feeling of download and as you said some of the sculptures make me very sad. But all are very interesting. It was very nice you showed these to us. (Your photos are great)

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    1. orvokki: Stories which shout to be heard. Thank you - and thank you for backtracking through my posts.

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  63. An interesting exhibition indeed. Dealing with some health/mobility/independent living issues with my Mum at the moment, so understand why the people in wheelchairs is rather confronting.

    Hope you are well EC. Happy Christmas.

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    1. carol in cairns: Lovely to see you venturing into the blogosphere again. Those issues have teeth don't they? Sending hugs and oodles of positive wishes your way.

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  64. Golly - they look so real. Yes - I can see how they would make one melancholy, especially seeing them in person.

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    1. Lynn: They did look real didn't they. Realler than real.

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