Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Sunday, 28 October 2018

Sunday Selections #403

Sunday Selections was originally brought to us by Kim of Frogpondsrock, as an ongoing meme where participants could post previously unused photos languishing in their files.
 
The meme is now continued by River at Drifting through life.  The rules are so simple as to be almost non-existent.  Post some photos under the title Sunday Selections and link back to River.  Clicking on any of the photos will make them embiggen. 
 
Like River I usually run with a theme. I am not going to share my blog friend's visit this week (next week and probably the week after) but take you to an exhibition we went to shortly before she arrived.


'Sculpture in the Paddock' was new to us, but is apparently an annual event.  We will be going back next year. 

Some of the sculptures I loved, some were decidedly 'meh' and some were beyond me.  We both thoroughly enjoyed the day though.  It was indeed held in a paddock - attached to a nearby winery and sheep farm.  As well as the sculptures I will show some of the paddock's residents.

As always there are LOTS of photos.


Blind by Suzie Bleach and Andrew Townsend ($25,000)

Blind is apparently an allegory of the pro-coal industry lobby.  They say that the horse (like coal) was once fundamental to our survival but has now been superseded.  They add (I wish) that its arguments are exhausted and it is condemned to irrelevancy and redundancy.
When the allegory was explained I could see it, but would have struggled without an explanation.  I like the sculpture though.

The trees are nature's sculpture and I loved them.


Enter the Dragon by Greg McLean ($10,500)

A self taught artist who says he is driven by the love of the Australian landscape and its native animals.



Romping Rabbits by Tobias Bennett ($12,000 the pair)
Big smiles.


Other people reported being dive-bombed by magpies.  We weren't.  It is only the males who swoop, and only for a very brief period while they are protecting their young.




The dam was very shallow, but the ducks and their families didn't care.

Ligni Unum (Solitary Tree) by Ulan Murray ($29,000)
I was fascinated by this one, and loved seeing the delicate tracery of the roots.



Field of Dreams by Adam Humphreys ($6,500)
Apparently another allegory.  'To be free to from the chains which hold us back, whether it be addiction/dependence or even our own thoughts; it is not enough to break the links, they need to be torn from the ground...'



I would love to fill the garden with sculptures but these prices are out of my league.

I loved this ram's horns and only noticed when I got home just what a big boy he is.  I hope that paddock stays thistle free.



The bicycles apparently remained after an earlier Sculpture in the Paddock.  It was a breezy days and those wheels were flying...


The alpaca seemed to be perfectly happy with the ram and a small handful of ewes.

There are of course many more photos, which I might feature later.






152 comments:

  1. I love the Joyous bunnies! All of it really, Dear

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    1. Cloudia: Weren't the bunnies fun? And (relatively) cheap compared to some of the sculptures on display.

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  2. Oh my that ram is a huge boy. At Oregon State University, they have studies going, or used to, on why so many rams turn out to be gay. A very conservative foundation, left by a logging family for student scholarships, then refused scholarships to Oregon State, citing its lack of morals, and the gay ram study as one indicator. Cracked me up for some reason. Farmers have a real problem with gay rams because when they want to bring in a ram to their herd to you know, have on with the ewes, its a big waste of their time and money if the ram is not interested in ewes. Those darn immoral rams! LOL. Enough of the Oregon ram stories. Love the sculptures and I too wish I could deck out the spaces in my yard with art of all sorts. But you have the beautiful birds in your yard and those gorgeous flowers.

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    1. I had no idea about Oregon State & the gay ram study--very interesting!!

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    2. Strayer: Stud rams are expensive. I am not surprised that the farmers are miffed when they get one who walks on the other side.

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    3. fishducky: Me too. I was fascinated. What is the world coming too.

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    4. Here's a link from a 2005 Corvallis paper on the gay ram study.
      https://www.gazettetimes.com/news/local/the-science-of-rams-and-sexuality-not-all-seek-ewes/article_889425fd-3501-5b48-88ce-8c7ef302ae01.html

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    5. Strayer: Thanks for the link. I read it with a great deal of interest.

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  3. What a great show!
    If I had to choose just one I think I might go for the cyclists.I find that these days I am so often faced (confronted?) with difficult moral choices I just have to step back and consider them quietly, without the madding crowd.
    But those riders seem more abut enjoyment than competition.

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    1. dinahmow: We really liked the cyclists too. They weren't part of the 'main' exhibition this year, but by themselves (except for the sheep and alpaca). I really wish the exhibition had still been on when you visited.

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    2. Never mind-you have "taken me along"

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    3. dinahmow: I was being a bit selfish. I would have liked your perspective on some of them - ones I haven't featured in this post.

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  4. What a great set of photos. Lots of variety there.

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    1. Jamie Ghione: There was a heap of variety. Over fifty sculptures and most of them were very different indeed.

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  5. what an amazing place to visit, so much creation and talent, I love it all!

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    1. Sandi: Yes. And the horse is only just held together...

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  7. Me, too! I think I love the happy rabbits the most, but I enjoyed them all. I was fascinated by the size of that ram, too. :-)

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    1. DJan: The rabbits were fun. And yes, that ram was a very big boy. His horns were impressive too.

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  8. Dear EC
    Some thought provoking and disturbing sculptures on view. I do like the happy rabbits and the tree in particular, although can appreciate the artistry of the others.
    Thank you for sharing your visit.
    Best wishes
    Ellie

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    1. Ellie Foster: Well put. I could (and did) appreciate the artistry even if some of them were not ones I understood. Or particularly liked.

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  9. He is certainly very... large. How does he walk?

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    1. Birdie: I suspect he walks carefully. Very carefully.

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  10. Apparently the Magpies are especially drawn to cyclists for some reason. Not a one of them was ever aggressive towards us so they obviously realize the value of tourism and left us alone!

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    1. David Gascoigne: Being swooped by a magpie can be frightening. I am glad you escaped. Like the corvid family they are intelligent birds and recognise people...

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  11. (I love trees)

    Beware of those tricky swooping magpies

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    1. Author R. Mac Wheeler: I love trees too. Perhaps the magpies knew that we feed (and welcome) their cousins. We saw no agression from them at all.

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  12. Interesting sculptures allowing free expression.

    I love the ram - he looks very interested in the photographer! While the alpaca calmly continues grazing. :)

    Have yourself a wonderful week, EC...cuddles to Jazz. :)

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    1. Lee: The ram was interested in us. Which seemed only fair on the tit for tat equation.
      I hope you and your furry friends enjoy your week too.

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  13. These are awesome. Would love to see it in person. The small town I grew up in was called Mine Hill and it was named so for all the mines. Coal was big business there. I remember sitting in class and hearing the cave ins. Such dangerous work.

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    1. mxtodis123: Coal is big business in a lot of the world. And still (despite advances in technology) very dangerous. I cannot imagine sitting in class hearing the cave-ins. That must have been dreadful.

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  14. I loved seeing these - what fantastic pieces! Real trees win for me every time, but I loved the animals, and the 'Solitary Tree'. The horse made me sad, though.
    Thank you EC - another brilliant exhibition.

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    1. Alexia: I am a dedicated tree hugger. I took rather a lot of tree photos as we wandered around the sculptures. I could very happily find a home for Solitary Tree here. And yes, the horse was desperately sad.

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  15. Such a beautiful combination of animals and sculpture!

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    1. Marie Smith: Thank you. I really enjoyed the day.

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  16. I'm sending you one from the Maryhill Museum on the Columbia River--- Delightful post today.

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    1. Bill: Thank you so much for the photos you sent. I adore sculpture gardens and would love to wander round the one which featured the work you photographed and sent.

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  17. I love the scupture. And, man, those horns are HUGE. :D

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  18. How utterly amazing! What talent!

    The blind horses. Carole Anne Carr has written books about the abuses of the coal mining industry in Wales in which the ponies live their lives pulling carts of coal from the deep mines. Excellent writer, excellent books.

    https://caroleannecarr.co.uk/book-reviews

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    1. Susan Kane: Thank you for fuelling my easily ignited bookie lust. Sadly coal mining abuses (of both animals and people) were accepted for far too long.

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  19. Wow, those are awesome. Some people have such great talent.

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    1. Mary Kirkland: I am blown away by the talent of so many people.

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  20. You tickled my funny bone with the thistle comment!
    I like the sculptures, too

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    1. kylie: Having once, many years ago, squatted over a thistle in late night emergency toilet stop I know just how much they hurt.

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  21. The horse statue is very moving. An allegory it may be, but in fact (as Susan Kane also mentioned) places around the world used "pit pones" in the mining industry, including my home province. These ponies were kept permanently underground - housed, fed, etc. and only taken above ground during the miners' two week vacation in the summer. Their eyes had to adjust to the light. They were highly valued, though, and - all things considered - treated well because of it, often considered more valuable than the miners. But doesn't it seem like a crime against nature to put such hardworking, beautiful animals below ground for most of their days . . .

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    1. jenny_o: NO arguments here. To incarcerate the pit ponies, the canaries, the children, the workers under ground strikes me as obscene...

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  22. I had such a head of steam worked up that I forgot to say how much I loved the bunny sculptures - they are so natural looking. And I thought the ram was a statue! . . . poor guy :)

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    1. jenny_o: Not a problem. I am so sorry I flicked you on a sensitive spot. And no, that ram was very real. The bunnies were fun weren't they? And frolicing is something they do well.

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  23. Hi EC - I can quite see why you were and are entranced by these sculptures ... man-made or natural ... good old boy - he is a winner that's for sure. I wrote about a Texel Ram ... that went for sterling pounds 230,000 - its name was Deveronvale Perfection!! I wrote about him. But he wasn't a sculpture either. Love the horses ... so clever - well they all are ... beautiful photos - thank you ... loved seeing them all - cheers Hilary

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    1. Hilary Melton-Butcher: I suspect I would wince if I knew just how much 'Big Boy' cost. I don't know whether they own him or rent him, but he wouldn't come cheap either way.
      The exhibition was a delight and we WILL be back next year.

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  24. The horse sculpture is stunning. Coal is still BiG here where I live. People want to believe we can mine and use it for energy forever. When I worked as a job coach, it tried to steer people away from that vocation.
    I don’t think the environment can accept fossil fuels as an option.

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    1. Rick Watson: Sadly our Government is still trying to convince us that coal is king and that we can afford the high environmental price. I don't agree. As the artist to the first sculpture (and another I didn't show this time) don't agree.

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  25. This is quite a collection!
    Big boy, indeed.
    : )

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    1. Caterina: It was a very big collection. There were over fifty sculptures on display.

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  26. That's an amazing art venue, and fabulous art.

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  27. Those sculptures are really good, I didn't know there was a meaning to the horse and coal one. Love the ducks and ducklings.

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    1. River: I was super impressed - and of course I loved the ducks and ducklings too.

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    2. Pit ponies lived all of their lives in coal mines, if they died they were hauled out and sent to the Knackers yard for animal food and GLUE.In the UK that is.

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    3. Vest: It is sometimes difficult to be proud of our species. Particularly for the way we treat other inhabitants of our world.

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  28. I love sculpture, and have always gravitated to them when I visit museums. These you have shown are quite a treat. Liked the horse a lot, and the lizard dragon. I enjoy seeing what others create.

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    1. D.G. Hudson: I am fond of sculpture too, particularly for some reason outside. I was awed by the skill of these artists and we thoroughly enjoyed our day.

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  29. It never ceases to amaze me when I see talent like this. The time it must have taken to come up with such realistic sculptures is truly amazing and beautiful. Those Romping Rabbits and the bicycles are my faves. Love that you get to visit such cool places EC, so we can enjoy the fun and exploration too. Hugs...RO

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    1. RO: Thank you. I am more than happy to share our expeditions. I hope your week goes well. Hugs.

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  30. Sehr schön die Skulpturen der einsame Baum ist klasse mit seinen Wurzeln schön gearbeitet.

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    1. Noke: I really liked that one too. Those roots reaching down were beautifully executed.

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  31. The sculptures are stunning. Such a fascinating event. It would definitely be on my list to see every year.

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    1. Mason Canyon: Having found out about it this year, we will definitely be back next.

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    1. messymimi: I loved your Sunday Selections. We really don't celebrate it, and there are no decorations around (except in the shops).

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  33. I really like the iron horse, but all of this park seems fascinating!

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    1. Jono: I liked the horse too. Rather a lot. The exhibition was temporary, and by now the paddock has been returned to the sheep.

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  34. I thought the dragon was mounting a cannon and got very excited for a moment.

    Also, that horse is incredible! That's such a creative sculpture.

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    1. John Wiswell: I wondered about that mount too. And was blown away by the horse.

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  35. Can't decide which is my favorite. No matter - I couldn't afford any of them. Thank you for posting these. There is nothing like this near my home.

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    1. Myrna R.: We can't afford them either. There were smaller versions of some of them also on sale. We couldn't afford those either. I am pleased we could afford the $10 entry fee, and we had a lovely day.

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  36. I too would love to have a garden sculpture. Our Botanical garden has some cool ones that move in the wind, some simple, some complex. All no doubt well beyond what I could afford. But I can take pictures :)

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    1. mshatch: I do love sculptures moved by the wind. There is an excellent one at the airport, and others at our arboretum. As you know, I can and do take pictures. Lots of them.

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  37. I was excited to see what I might think was meh and beyond me, although everyone seemed delightful in their own reason. The animals always delight, but the solitary tree with the roots exposed, yes it too was probably my favorite. All interesting though, even down to those light tan shoes that appeared brand new and so oddly staged! Enjoy your lovely Sunday, or rather I guess you've entered Monday! Take care.

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    1. Karen S.: I left out the ones I thought were meh and/or incomprehensible. The post was already getting a tad photo heavy (which is not unusual). I might revisit the exhibition later.
      I hope your Sunday - and the week to come, is delightful.

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  38. The rabbits certainly made me smile. All of the sculptures were thought provoking... and astronomically expensive! The ram was incredible. I hope an ewe was standing behind him, or he had way too many legs! :)

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    1. River Fairchild: There was indeed a ewe hidden behind that ram. The fact that only her legs were visible says something about just how big he was - in every way.
      There were a couple of other sculptures which were even more expensive, including one that was 'Price on Application'. I shudder to think.

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  39. What a wonderful event. I really appreciate the allegory sculpts. Thanks for sharing. Enjoy your day.

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    1. Sandra Cox: It was wonderful. I appreciated it all, including the ones I didn't like or understand (if that makes sense).

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  40. I am surprised that the artist considered bunnies 'native' species as the Europeans brought them over to no good effect. I enjoyed the sculptures. Thanks for sharing.

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    1. Sue in Italia/In the Land of Cancer: The appreciation of native species referred to the goanna in the sculpture above the bunnies. Most of the things we imported to Australia (including the people) have caused problems.

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  41. Love the bicycles. It must've been an enjoyable day trip.

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    1. Olga Godim: I really liked them too, and am glad they were retained from a previous exhibition.

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  42. Beautiful scuptures, the bikes and the Rabbits I do love them.

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  43. I love the rabbits, too. And the allegories. Today, my BFF & I drove 4 hours into the Ozark mtns. for a week's stay at the Writers Colony at Dairy Hollow in Eureka Springs, AR/ USA. She is finishing her 4th novel & I'm working on a Compendium of Journal Jottings as well as a memoir.

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    1. Patricia A. Laster: I hope that you and your BFF have a really productive and just plain wonderful time at the Writer's Colony.

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  44. I don't know why, but we have a large metal sculpture of a horse in front of the building where I work. I'd love to know why it's there. Horses have nothing to do with our company--as far as I know.

    Love,
    Janie

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    1. Janie Junebug: Now you have me wondering. A gambler at the top of your company? Or just a lover of horses?

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    2. I have no idea. The company's CEO is relatively new. He visited our site once (my manager wore a tie that was way too short and looked like a little boy's clip-on tie. I said nothing). I think the CEO stayed about ten minutes and took off. He certainly wouldn't go around to see what workers are actually doing. I can't imagine that he knows what we do or how we do it.

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    3. Janie Junebug: I doubt that most CEOs have the faintest idea what workers do. Which infuriates me. I suspect that most of them couldn't do what the workers do either - despite the vast differences in pay packets.

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    4. Soon after I started working there, a number of managers came in to meet us while we were training. They admitted that they couldn't do what we do. I spoke up and said, Then we should get paid the most.

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    5. Janie Junebug: And they smiled, went away and nothing changed. Hiss and spit.

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  45. Rather impressive ones at that.
    A magpie swooped upon a man who just took his hat off at Airlie Beach, the man has ended up blind in one eye, may get his sight back in time..

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    1. Margaret-whiteangel: That poor man. I hope he does regain his sight.

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  46. On the funny side. The little boy asked the pirate captain "how did you lose your eye'? the reply was I was returning from hospital to my ship when a seagull pooped into my eye; it was the day I had the Hook fitted.

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    1. Vest: Ouch. I suspect that getting used to that hook caused several injuries...

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    1. only slightly confused. So much creativity, so much talent.

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  48. Loved them all, but especially the trees, both man-made and natural. Breathtaking artist - nature.

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    1. Nilanjana Bose: Nature is indeed an incredible artist. I love her galleries and am awed by her palette.

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  49. You never run out of amazing things to share with us. These metal sculptures are among my favorites.

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  50. I can't tell you how much I love metal sculptures. Sooo much. In fact I thought (briefly) about learning to weld so I could create them. (Big sigh.) Guess I won't.

    Thanks for sharing these beauties and the sheep and alpaca.

    Teresa

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    1. T. Powell Coltrin: Never, say never, I would love to see what you created if you did venture into the world of welding. And yes, I love sculpture too.

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  51. The horse statue is extremely well done but it leaves me with a feeling of sadness.

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  52. These are pretty and unusual! Yes the horses were so different but nice in their own way. I liked the one with roots too, looked like rain?? Fun times

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    1. Kim@stuffcould...: I really like the Solitary Tree. I would happily have given it a home if my wallet allowed it (which it doesn't).

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  53. The alpaca looks very endearing - sweet and calm.
    Have a nice, calm, safe week.

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    1. Rawknrobyn: Alpacas have that effect don't they? There is an alpaca farm nearby which some day we will visit.
      I hope that after this latest atrocity calm and peace return to your world. Hugs.

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  54. What fun! It's kinda neat that some of the sculptures also delivered a "message" of some kind. I'm very glad to hear none of the magpies swooped you. (or pooped on you...)

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    1. Susan: It is a very, very long time since a magpie has swooped me. Other visitors to the exhibition carried sticks to ward them off. I forgot. It isn't a long time since a bird has crapped on me. I didn't notice and went out. I did the week's grocery shopping in a crapped on t-shirt.

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  55. A big boy indeed!

    I love all of the sculptures, they are stunning. I think the romping rabbits are my favourites. Now I want something beautiful like this in my back garden!

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    1. LL Cool Joe: I would LOVE to have the money and space to fill the garden with sculpture. There would certainly be dragons. And wind sculptures....

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  56. That's some great art, but I must say the photo of those trees are my favorite!

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    1. Lon Anderson: I took lots of photos of trees as we wandered around the exhibition.

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  57. Absolutely delightful sculptures. Love Mr. Ram he is big and handsome.

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    1. Rasma Raisters: I suspect that Mr Ram is worth more than our house.

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  58. Wow - such surprising and wonderful sculptures!

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    1. Lady Fi: It was an incredibly eclectic collection.

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  59. Overall, no one can beat a tree but I too liked the romp of the rabbits :-)

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    1. Lisa Southard: I am so glad to learn that there are a lot of tree huggers who visit me.

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  60. I like the horse best. He looks like he's wearing a blindfold. The bicycle is cool too, the rider leans forward with increased wind? I can't see how it works.

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    1. MarkD60: The bicycles were in a separate paddock that we didn't have access too so I couldn't get very close to them. The wheels spun with the wind so it is possible that the rider was also wind balanced - but I couldn't see how either.

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  61. Oh wow...such stunning sculptures!!
    I really love these, especially the 🌲...they are so life-like!😊😊
    Thank you so much for sharing these, I really enjoyed!!

    A hug.

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    1. Ygraine: I loved the trees too. Both the natural ones and the sculptor's work. Hugging you back.

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  62. Such a lovely post with the variety of sculptures, trees and animals.

    I did enjoy seeing all of the sculptures, there are some talented people who produce these pieces. I did like the tree, the rabbits and the bicycles.

    Always nice to see real trees, sheep, alpacas and ducks though.

    A very nice Sunday variety, thank you.

    All the best Jan

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    1. Lowcarb team member ~Jan: I am glad that others enjoyed the exhibition with me. And the juxtaposition of the art (natural and created).

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  63. A great series of photos. Those sculptures are fascinating. I would love to have one of those sculptures in my garden but never going to be able to afford one of those. Always love seeing those animals and birds on your blog.

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    1. Denise inVA: We are never going to have any of these sculptures in our garden either. I am very grateful that they were on public display though.

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  64. EC, I would love to see these in person! Wow, amazing! I truly loved them all! They are so special! The tree one is my favourite! I love the animals! That ram must have a headache with those big horns! LOL! Big Hugs!

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    1. Magic Love Crow: I really liked the tree too. There was a smaller version there, also available for sale, and also out of my price range.
      I wonder whether the ram does get a headache? I hope not. Hugs gratefully received and returned.

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  65. Beautiful. M favorites are they horses and trees. How are you?

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    1. e: I really loved the trees (real and sculpted). I am fine. I fell yesterday, but was lucky. I am bruised and swollen but broke nothing. How are you doing?

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  66. The trees and the rabbits are fabulous, the horse is poignant and your 'thistle' comment made me laugh aloud and startle my dogs

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    1. Kim: I am sorry that the paths my mind runs along startled your dog - and agree wholeheartedly about the sculptures.

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  67. I just love the Ligni Unum - such a fantastic sculpture. I wouldn't mind having that in my garden, but unfortunately those prices are out of my league as well. However, I do have "things" in my garden - little terracotta birds, clay coyotes and snakes, a small concrete Japanese pagoda that I saved after the fires at our old house (I had forgotten to take it with us when we moved since it was completely covered by ivy - certainly a blog post one day). I think it makes a garden even more interesting and a place to breathe and find peace.

    That ram - what a wonderful guy!

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  68. Carola Bartz: We have 'things' in the garden too. And I wouldn't be without them. Like you, I would like to have Ligni Unum but am glad to have seen it.
    The ram was impressive wasn't he?

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  69. Wow! What a day! So many interesting sculptures to view and take in. I love, love, love Solitary Tree. It really pulled me in. The rabbits in movement were also great. What a great annual event to stumble upon. Thanks for sharing. :)
    ~Jess

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    1. DMS ~Jess: Thank you. And thank you for trawling back through my posts. I am very grateful we found out about this exhibition and we will certainly be back next year.

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  70. Those creations are amazing (a word I use too often, but fits here, for sure.) It's difficult to capture horses, I hear, but that artist surely did.

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    1. Lynn: Using such a difficult medium too. I was in awe at the talent.

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