Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Sunday, 25 July 2021

Sunday Selections #543


Sunday Selections was originally brought to us by Kim, of Frogpondsrock, as an ongoing meme where participants could post previously unused photos languishing in their files.
 
Huge thanks to Cie who gave me this wonderful Sunday Selections image.
 
The meme was then continued by River at Drifting through life.  Sadly she has now stepped aside (though she will join us some weeks), and I have accepted the mantle. 
 
The rules are so simple as to be almost non-existent.  Post some photos under the title Sunday Selections and link back to me. Clicking on any of the photos will make them embiggen. 
 

I usually run with a theme. Wednesday of the week just gone was chilly.  Bright, clear and chilly.  So filled with anticipation I headed out just after first light to try to freeze bubbles.  And had some success.  Settle back with a beverage of your choice.  In my usual minimalist fashion there are lots of photos to come.

 Dawn brought a soft blush to the sky.

The ground was frosty - though it didn't seem to bother the magpies who were searching through the leaf litter for tasty treats.

When the bubbles first land they are transparent with a beautiful iridescence.


As they freeze they become opaque and the iridescence disappears.

Remember this double bubble.  I will come back to it later.

I adore the edging of frost around the anemone leaves.  I think of them as frost flowers.


You can see that this bubble has started to freeze and the iridescence is limited to the very top.



The bubbles fascinate me when they pop too.  Who knew that a frozen bubble would leave a shell behind it.



Or that a popped bubble could look like stretched chewing gum.

I liked the bubble which landed in the lavender.  Sadly it didn't last.
A close look at this bubble will show you that it has holes in it - but retains its shape.






The series of photos above blows me away.  A soap bubble with a slow leak collapsing in on itself.

Just a few more photos now.  Ok I lied, several more photos.  I am returning to the bubbles I first blew and photographed.  They froze beautifully, and the frost was just starting to settle on those frozen bubbles when I came inside.  The double bubble (remember it) had lost its top bubble but the shell remained and it didn't pop its twin. 







I was outside for a little over an hour and had a wonderful time.  It wasn't 'quite' cold enough.  I didn't succeed in decorating the lawn with a plethora of bubbles but was still smiling when I came in.  In an extra bonus, my ongoing nausea was at low levels and I could reward myself with a cup of tea.

I hope that you (and your inner children) also find fun in the week to come.





 

146 comments:

  1. What lovely variegated grass (I GUESS it's a grass) that the bubble landed on. I LOVE variegated grass, and have several large clumps that reach seven-feet in height and have red flowers. In fall, the flowers turn brown, the leaves turn tan, and the plant keeps its fountain-like shape for most of the winter before finally getting so soggy and wind-blown that it slowly collapses upon itself. The official name of my variety is Miscanthus senensis 'Variegatus,' and some of the common names suggest its Asian origin: Japanese Ribbon (or Silver) Grass, and Chinese Ribbon (or Silver) Grass. It grows in such varied climatic environments in America that I assume it must surely grow where you are. Here's a photo: https://www.bluestem.ca/miscanthus-variegatus.htm

    Thank you so much for the beautiful photos. Surely, no person who loves bubbles can go far wrong in life.

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    1. Snowbrush: It is actually leaves from emerging (and some of them are flowering) spring bulbs - a mixture of alliums and jonquils. Like you I have a soft spot for many of the different grasses. And hope to never lose my joy in bubbles.

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    2. "And hope to never lose my joy in bubbles."

      Given that you've kept finding joy in bubbles for this long, it's surely looking good for it remaining until the end!

      Love,
      -S.

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    3. Snowbrush: I hope so. I really hope so.

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  2. What fun and it sure makes for some great photos too! It never gets cold enough here in Florida to do something like that, but I'll be sure to remember it if I ever go somewhere cold in the winter. Very cool! Thanks for sharing with us. :)

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    1. Martha: It doesn't ever get cold enough in quite a lot of Australia for this particular joy either. I am very glad that it does here.

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  3. This is the most compelling reason that I can think of, Sue, why we should never grow up. Who could ever remain aloof to the sheer joy of this?

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    1. David M. Gascoigne: I am certainly not immune. I had a heap of fun. Himself enjoyed the photos but was not tempted to join the play. His loss.

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  4. Oh, I just LOVE this post, with all the pretty bubbles in many different stages of freeze. I am happy to have spent some time here with you, dear friend. Thank you!!

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    1. DJan: Thank you so much. I really did have fun, and am more than happy to share it.

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  5. I love the frozen garden bubbles, you are so lucky EC.

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    1. Bob Bushell: I love them too and am so glad that we had a 'nearly' cold enough morning for them.

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  6. Oh it got cold enough finally. Lovely, and wonderful bubble photos. Those frosty leaves are wonderful too. I like rise and fall of a frozen bubble very much. Thanks for showing. And I like that your nausea levels allowed you a well deserved cup of tea after this.

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    1. Charlotte (MotherOwl): An early morning cup of tea hasn't been a regular occurrence for months now. I am so very grateful I got one that morning. Isn't it fascinating watching the bubbles collapse?

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  7. Bubbling over with fun!

    It's very windy up here this morning. I didn't linger long when I went outside...just grab the paper from the driveway, put the rubbish bins out, and, like the bubbles, popped back inside.

    I hope the coming week is kind to you, EC. Take care...cuddles to Jazz. :)

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    1. Lee: It is chilly and breezy here too - with snow on the hills. Hopefully Jazz will have a better week this week - if he does I will too. Stay warm and cosy with the furry overlords.

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  8. Refreshing! Especially as we are in the hottest months of summer.

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    1. Alex J. Cavanaugh: Definitely refreshing. Even brisk. Hottest part of summer? Shudder.

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  9. I'm having fun at viewing your frozen bubble show. I used to play with bubbles when the kids and grandkids were growing up but never attempted to blow bubbles in winter.

    We made giant bubbles too. I wonder how they would behave in the cold.

    Thanks for sharing your joyful bubble making photos.
    Hugs, Julia

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    1. Julia: I 'think' that it would need to be very cold before the giant bubbles froze. I could be wrong though - and would love to see it. Next winter for you perhaps?
      I am very happy to share my fun.

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  10. I am absolutely amazed at that bubble stuff. Have never seen it anywhere else except on your blog. I was trying to comment last time about the birds (love them anyway even if they are monsters) and the bubble that would not freeze. Having horrible computer problems so hoping and hoping this comment will post.

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    1. J C: I am sorry that you have been having trouble commenting. Were you in that dreadful prove you are not a robot stage? We love the sulphur crested vandals too - and the garden.
      I first found out about freezing bubbles from someone in your hemisphere - and have had a heap of fun with it.

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  11. Great frozen bubble pictures! It certainly looks cold enough to freeze most things. I really love the first photo, of the beautiful pale pink sky, but it did make me shiver! May you have many more fun mornings blowing bubbles, EC...

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    1. Alexia: We have had a warmer winter than usual - and a wetter one too. There was snow on the hills this morning but no frost. There was however a spectacular sunrise - which I will probably share later.,

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  12. What fun on a frosty morning! So pretty too.

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  13. Amazing. I am so pleased you have been able to have one bubble play morning at least. The deflated one does look like chewing gum. the first photo looks very peaceful and serene.

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    1. Andrew: I am glad that you can see the 'chewing gum' analogy. I really like the very early morning and that first photo is not uncommon.

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  14. They are perfect and beautiful. I can't wait for winter and a good frost to do this. What great fun!

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    1. Strayer: I really, really hope you do get a good frost this year.

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  15. "a soft blush to the sky" <--you have such a magic with words and the camera lens, beautiful woman.
    Gratitude for your gifts to blogland and this earth.
    <3

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    1. Rawknrobyn: Thank you so much. I am blushing brighter than the sky was that morning.

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  16. You have inspired me for this winter.

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    1. Joanne Noragon: I suspect you would have less than no difficulty in finding a morning cold enough.

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  17. These pictures are amazing. You know as cold as it gets here, I have never blown bubbles in the winter. Something to think about. :)

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    1. Juli: I hope you will try it - and take photos. It really is amazing fun.

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  18. Replies
    1. Cloudia: It is a HEAP of fun. Something I think we all need.

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  19. The slowly collapsing bubble is amazing. I love the frost edged leaves. I love the look of frost in general, while at the same time being glad we don't get any here. or maybe we do and it's gone by the time I crawl out from under two doonas and a blanket.

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    1. River: I remember crunchy frosts where you could feel/hear the grass shattering as you walked across it. It has been a while.

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  20. Have 'they' found a reason for the ongoing nausea and a possible treatment? Fingers crossed.

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    1. River: The jury is still out. At first the doctors thought it was a medication. I am now off that one, and while the nausea is mostly better it hasn't gone. The treatment? More medication, which gets doled out in a grudging way.

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  21. Bellas burbujas te mando un beso

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    1. J.P.Alexander: They are, aren't they? And thank you.

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  22. I forgot about the bubbles. You posted about them last year. You'll have to do a January post to remind those of us north of the equator to try this.

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    1. Mike: Or perhaps you could note it on your calendar...

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    2. Let's don't get carried away now. I'm trying to make this your problem and you're not cooperating.

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    3. Mike: Sorry about that but no, I am NOT cooperating.

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  23. Beautiful post with these photos and the colours are sensational. xx

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    1. aussie aNNie: I do love bubbles. All year round. Including the ones which come in a glass.

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  24. It's amazing what you can do with a bit of soap and a soap blower. I've blown soap bubbles in the summer, but never even considered doing it in the winter. Now I must try that in about six months. Thanks for sharing these incredible photos and the sequence shots. Like time lapse photography with incredible results. You are a genius with a camera, dear EC. And to think it was your idea of playtime!

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    1. Bleubeard and Elizabeth: Thank you so much. It was most definitely playtime. I do hope that you will try it in winter. Having discovered this treat a few years ago I wait and hope for the weather to get cold enough each and every year.

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  25. What a great idea--- that's a new one for me! Delightful images!

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    1. Bill: It really is fun - and I would love to see what you could do with the idea and your superior camera skills.

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  26. Hi Sue – wonderful soft blush … beautiful description … our skies paint stunning art works for us …
    Early frosts plenty of living bugs for the greedy magpies …
    It’s interesting how the bubbles become opaque; your frosty leaves are so pretty … but the popped bubble stretched like chewing gum – revolting … but perfect description. Your early bubbles with their opaque colouration …
    It sounds like you had a break from a nausea troubling week – so happy you could treat your ongoing child-self with the bubbles and time outside …
    Love them all – thank you … all the best - Hilary

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    1. Hilary Melton-Butcher: Thank you. My inner child is frequently the healthiest and happiest part of me, and delighted in this game. The nausea is still with me, but for that morning at least I had a delightful nausea free interlude.

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  27. Hi EC,

    Great photos and something for me to try in winter.

    :o)

    Cheers

    PM

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  28. Just love your bubbles and dedication to do that each year and taking photos - thank you.
    Love the first photo too, the sky is lovely.

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    1. Margaret D: Our early morning skies quite often look like that, and I have many, many photos of that type of beauty on the PC. With luck my bubble blowing days for the winter have not finished yet.

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  29. Oh how lovely! I forgot about your winter bubbles. It might get cold enough here soon, it would be fun to try something exciting on a shivery morning. Thank you for sharing all these fascinating shots.

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    1. Kim: I do hope you get a cold enough morning. I would love to see the photographs you could take...

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  30. The bubbles are fascinating especially the one where your reflection shows. I can see how it would be easy to lose track of time watching the bubbles. Hope you continue to feel better and have a wonderful week my friend.

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    1. Mason Canyon: I do find it easy to lose track of time on these blissfully cool mornings. Others say (repeatedly) that I am not sane.

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  31. I do love these frozen bubbles. 😊

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    1. Sandi: It is lovely to see you - and thank you.

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  32. I always look forward to your frozen bubbles, especially since it is usually hot as blazes here when you post them! They are gorgeous and it makes me happy. If we have a cold enough winter I am going to try it!

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    1. Anne in the kitchen: Thank you. When your possible bubble freezing time comes round it will be as hot as blazes here. I do hope you remember - and post photos to cool me down. (How is that for selfish).

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  33. Dear EC
    Fabulous bubbles! Your photos are a joy - no wonder they made you happy. They make me happy too!
    Have a good week
    Best wishes
    Ellie

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    1. Ellie Foster: My ever loving family talked (and still does) about small things for small minds. I stick my adult tongue out at them.

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  34. I really appreciate your bringing these bubble documentaries to the rest of us! They are fascinating. I, for one, don't have the enduring patience you obviously possess to wait them out in all their states of decay but I enjoy witnessing the process through your photos.
    Hope your week continues with less nausea to bother you. Hugs to you and scritches to the furry beastie.

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    1. River Fairchild: I struggle with patience - but was fascinated so that elusive trait wasn't even called on. Nausea back here this morning but at least it is coming and going a bit rather than settling down for the long haul. I will pass your homage on to Jazz when he surfaces again.

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  35. I'm glad the nausea was better. That's never a fun thing to deal with. Loved the bubble pictures. It's so hot here I'm really looking forward to cooler weather.

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    1. Mary Kirkland: Thank you. I hope you get some cool relief. Soon.

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  36. Funny this, I never associate Oz with frozen bubbles and frost on grass. Endless sunshine. Your series of bubbles posts have enlightened me. They are truly wondrous to behold and remind me that there is magic everywhere if we only look for it.

    Glad your nausea is not as bothersome.

    XO
    WWW

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    1. Wisewebwoman: Some parts of Oz don't ever see frost. We do, each and every winter. And a big yes to the magic everywhere. The nausea has not gone, but having even brief periods without it is WONDERFUL.

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  37. I do like the colours in that dawn sky ... so beautiful.

    Lovely to see all of your frozen bubbles, all the different shapes.

    Pleased that your nausea started to ease and I hope it's stayed away.

    Wishing you a good week ahead.

    All the best Jan

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    1. Lowcarb team member ~Jan: Thank you. Dawn today looked much the same - and was truly beautiful. The nausea comes and goes, but the respites from it are amazing. I hope that you and Edie have a great week.

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  38. Love the frozen bubbles. You always teach me something new. I never thought about bubbles freezing. Now I want to try that next winter. The sky photo is a peaceful and lovely scene. Thanks for sharing and hope the nausea goes away and stays away. Take care of you, my friend.

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    1. Glenda Beall: I hope you can try it next winter. I have a huge weakness of skyscapes and have folder after folder of photos. The nausea is better but definitely not gone. I would love it to disappear completely.

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  39. Hola hijo de elefante!!!tu cielo es una maravilla, casi parece pintado a la acuarela por un artista...y ya luego, tus fotografias de estas burbujas y su iridiscencia, sus cambios , lo que se ve a traves de ellas y el tiempo hasta que congelan , con ese formato perfecto que has captado de maravillas con tu cΓ‘mara, como esa helada vistiendo las plantas y contorneandolas...Simplemente precioso espectaculo!!! Te deseo un comienzo de semana excelente
    y a segir cuidandose mucho!!! Abrazo grande!!!

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    1. eli mendez: Thank you so much. This is an annual treat for me and I am glad that you enjoyed it with me. You take care too.

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  40. What a joyful thing to do, i will have to remember to try it someday.

    As usual, my selections are over here.

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    1. messymimi: As usual I thoroughly enjoyed your selections. You are right. Freezing bubbles is a thing of joy.

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  41. I look forward to your frozen bubbles every year and you didn't disappoint. Each one slightly different like snowflakes :)
    Respite from nausea sounds fantastic, if only it could be longer lasting.
    Enjoy your week, EC

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    1. kylie: I look forward to them too and was worried that our warmer, damper winter was going to mean that they weren't possible. Now, being greedy, I hope for another chance...
      And a big yes on longer lasting nausea respite.

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  42. These are incredible photos of the bubbles, especially when they are embiggened. The bubble in the lavender reminds me of a snow globe with a village inside it, and the bottom bubble of the double bubble, with frost speckles on it, reminds me of a fortune-teller's crystal ball. Beautiful! I love the iridescence on many of these, too - spring/summer colours in winter. Thanks for sharing, EC.

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    1. jenny_o: I am glad that you enjoyed them with me. I am so glad that I saw an article about the possibility and remembered to try it. And even more glad that it worked, and has now become an annual treat.

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  43. What an interesting little project. Not the kind of photos, or weather, I was expecting.

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    1. John "By Stargoose And Hanglands" I suspect that you would have much more likelihood of success with this project than I do. We often get a couple of days where it is possible, but you could well get a lot more than that.

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  44. Yay for the beauty of frozen bubbles, which I had never seen until I started visiting your blog, so we al thank you so much! Hugs, RO

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    1. RO: Frozen bubbles are fun!!! Hugs received and reciprocated.

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  45. Oh WOW...these are utterly enchanting!!😊😊❤
    I am always filled with wonder when I see your beautiful bubbles...and they really are just as magical when popped...exactly like stretched chewing gum!!πŸ˜‰
    Love the picture of the dawn sky too...you live in such a gorgeous part of the world!😊😊
    So happy to read that your nausea had eased a little yesterday. Hope it has eased even more today!
    Oceans of love and hugs ❤❤❤❤❤❤❤

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    1. Ygraine: Thank you. I adore the sky and take many, many photos of it - with or without bubbles. The nausea continues to come and go. The going is an improvement though. I do hope you are feeling better.

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  46. I love your bubble and winter scenes. Wishing you a happy week.

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    1. e: Thank you. More (and different) wintry scenes next week. I hope that you and Lukas have a great week too.

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  47. Those bubbles are so awesome! I have never seen such a thing in Hawaii or elsewhere.

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    1. gigi-hawaii: Thank you. I am a lover of winter anyway and the bubbles are an extra bonus.

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  48. Bello aatardecer en la primera foto y una serie de burbujas a las que le has sacado mucho partiedo, en tus buenas votos.

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  49. Oh the bubbles are so fascinating!!! I love the double bubble!!! I enjoyed every one of the photos!!! :)

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    1. Rain: Thank you. I am so very glad I am not alone in being fascinated by frozen bubbles.

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  50. Coming here from DJan's blog. Had to see the frozen bubbles. You are not alone. They ARE fascinating. Thanks for sharing!

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    1. Rain: Thank you (and DJan). They blow me away and fill me with childish glee every year.

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  51. A little jealous as it doesn't ever get that cold here in Brisbane - the kids would have fun playing with frozen bubbles otherwise! it is particularly cold this morning, but no frost so not really all that cold to people in other parts of the world, haha!

    Hope your week is off to a good start :)

    Away From The Blue

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    1. Mica: My partner has family in Brisbane and they have been telling us how cold it is. And are content to enjoy frozen bubbles from afar.

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  52. That is a lot more interesting than I expected. Who knew?

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  53. Your frosty photos are always a delight. Love the bubbles, it is like watching a fun science experiment. How long have you been blowing these bubbles in cold weather? Very entertaining for me to view each one. Thanks so much!

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    1. DeniseinVA: Thank you. I have been freezing (or attempting to freeze) bubbles for a few years now - and really look forward to very cold mornings. I am probably one of the few who does.

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  54. I really enjoy your frozen (and freezing-in-process) bubbles! The frozen ones that survived look like Christmas ornaments.

    And I'm glad to hear you've had a reduction in your nausea - here's hoping it continues to diminish!

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    1. Diane Henders: I am glad. I love them too. And would gladly make room for Christmas ornaments which looked like that. The nausea continues to put in an appearance but the brief respites are very, very welcome.

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  55. Oh yay! Bubbles. I've been waiting for them:0) And they are oh so beautiful. Love that first picture too.
    YOU take special care.

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    1. Sandra Cox: I have been waiting for them too - and am so very glad that I finally got the opportunity to play with them. Hugs dear friend.

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  56. Dear EC, thanks so much for the frozen bubbles. Every winter, you delight all of us here in the northern climes with the wonder of them. As to having fun, I can report that the raccoons have returned to my home and with much noise tried to get into the attic the other night. Maybe they are the children, grown now, of the ones that took up residence during the Arctic Vortex in February when I posted about them. I'm going to start charing rent! Peace.

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    1. Dee: I am sure that the raccoons DO have fun - and doubt that they will pay you any rent. Good luck. And stay well and safe.

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  57. Oh my goodness fantastic to see the bubbles again, especially the double bubble, they are always so delightful to see. Your early morning dawn (blush) photo is stunning too. It has been a great vacation time for me here, but it's back to work tomorrow and my daughter and her hubby and my grand-daughter flew back home to Alabama today. That's sad but until we see them again we have all these fun summer memories. Take care, stay warm and creative!

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    1. 21 Wits: I am glad that you have packed your memory banks with happy memories and hope that you can see your family again sooner rather than later. I have a very soft spot for bubbles - in any season.

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  58. I have to do this in the Autumn season! I love when you do these bubbles EC! I am always smiling! They are so beautiful! You are creating art! It really is so cool!! I hope the nausea has stopped! Big Hugs!

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    1. Magic Love Crow: I hope that you do try this fun when your season changes - I would love to see the results. They make me smile here. BIG smiles. The nausea is still with me, and is reducing. Fingers crossed. Thanks for the hugs - which I reciprocate.

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  59. How cool the pictures and cold you must have been out there in winter. The bubbles look like Christmas baubles on the tree. The ones with the rainbow colours are beautiful, the leaky bubble is cute as it ebbs away. The frost on the leaves do make them like like flowers. Boil a few slices of ginger with water, add little honey and drink. It s our home remedy for nauusea. Stay well

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    1. kestrel: Thank you. Sadly ginger barely touches the sides of my ongoing nausea and isn't a cure.

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  60. it was truly a blast of pleasure to visit you this time dear EC :)

    i never saw such thing like bubbles you shared here and mentioned that they froze .

    i loved everything you told and specially the way you allowed us to see the process bubbles go through !
    that irradiance within bubble made it so fascinating wow ,yes i saw such soap bubbles but not those one that freeze ,sorry for my ignorance .

    i am fortunate that my little self is alive and healthy within me and refuses to grow at all ,i feel blessed for this gift or otherwise i could have not enjoy the even bit of life .
    thank you for the brilliant entertaining sharing always !
    more blessings to you and the loved ones !

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    1. baili: Feel no shame. Until a few years ago I had no idea that bubbles could freeze either. It was a delightful discovery. My inner child is frequently the healthiest and happiest part of me too. Stay well.

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  61. Those bubbles are so fascinating! Ha, you most certainly wouldn't see such a thing over here in my corner of the world!

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    1. Veronica Lee: I am very glad that my part of Australia does get cold enough for this fun - quite a lot of my country will never get cold enough either.

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  62. I very much like the bubble pictures.
    It's been a long time since I shared my photographs. Maybe one day I will again.

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    1. Ornery Owl of Naughty Netherworld Press and Readers Roost (Not Charlotte): Thank you. I hope you do join us again - I always like your eclectic take on the theme.

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  63. Ah, your beautiful bubbles, how much do I enjoy them!

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    1. Carola Bartz: Thank you. I enjoy them too. It is nearly (but not quite) cold enough to play this morning.

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  64. LOVE!!! Bubbles are such fun. I did this with a class years ago - so much fun!

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    1. Jemi Fraser: It is a HEAP of fun isn't it - something I firmly believe we all need.

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  65. Love the bubble pictures and learning it is cold enough where you live that they will freeze.
    This is the comment I tried to leave yesterday.

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    1. The Blog Fodder: It isn't often cold enough - but I can usually play this game a couple of times each winter. Thank you for persevering on the comment front.

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  66. Had to come back over to appreciate the cool air and beautiful bubbles, EC. Of course hugs are included. RO

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    1. RO: Thank you. The air is still cool - but not cool enough for bubbles today. Hugs back to you.

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  67. Your frozen bubbles are wonderful, magical, beautiful things. I've never forgotten them from the first time I saw them. Play, Child, play.

    :-)

    <3 <3 <3

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    1. neena maiya (guyana gyal): They are totally magical and a complete joy. I am so glad that I came across them on the internet - and remembered to play when winter arrived here. I will assuredly continue to play while I have the breath to do so.

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  68. It is always fun when we touch our inner child. :) Glad you had a nice time!

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