Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Sunday, 27 July 2014

Sunday Selections #182

Sunday Selections was originally brought to us by Kim, of Frogpondsrock, as an ongoing meme where participants could post previously unused photos languishing in their files. 

The meme is now continued by River at Drifting through life.  The rules are so simple as to be almost non-existent.  Post some photos under the title Sunday Selections and link back to River.

Like River I usually run with a theme.   This week I am taking you with me to our National Arboretum (still a baby arboretum, but with lots of promise).  We headed off this week to see the start of this month's special exhibit - 'Warm Trees'.

Volunteers were enlisted to knit and crochet scarves and rugs to wrap around the trees.  I understand the philosophy was to encourage people to visit - even in winter, but it was quirky and fun.

Many photos follow - and will as always embiggen if clicked upon.

I should add, that warmth was necessary.  We had sunshine, we had clouds, we had wind.  And this is where the wind was coming from.  A lazy wind which went through rather than round us.


Only some of the trees had been rugged up, in some of the forests.  Starting in the Cork oaks and Himalayan Cedars...











Then to the Dragon Trees.  Which were, like our last visit, caged dragons.  The cages had been insulated as well, so virtually no tree was visible, but some of them had been decorated.








Just a few more now...




The Arboretum is incredibly beautiful and in my usual restrained fashion I took a kazillion photos.  I will probably put up another Arboretum post later this week.

103 comments:

  1. How creative! Really dig the Dragon Trees.

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    1. Alex J. Cavanaugh: I like them too - but find myself wanting them to RELEASE THE DRAGONS.

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  2. That's so fun to knit and crochet some warm scarfs for the trees. What a fun idea! And those Dragon Trees...so creative!

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    1. The Furries of Whisppy: I hope they do it each year - and that more people knit and crochet so that all of the forests can snuggle in.

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  3. Brilliant! When i think of Canberra I think of the idiots that some of us have sent there and of the damage they do. I must focus more on the good things that you have there. And you do have a lot of wondrous things.

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    1. dinahmow: Oh yes, the idiots are here. And sometimes feel like they define the city - but they don't. Fortunately. We do have some blissful things. Which I need to get back to more often.

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    2. Australia is indeed a blissful place!

      The trees look huggable, don't they? Huggable. Is that a word? :-D

      Dinahmow is right, you have a lot of wondrous things here.

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    3. Guyana-Gyal: Huggable is indeed a work - and if it isn't, it should be. And there are blissful places everywhere - which is wonderful.

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  4. Such a fun start to a national treasure.

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    1. Joanne Noragon: It is a national treasure. And will only get better. And better.

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  5. What a fun project. I have never seen anything like it. And why do the Dragon Trees have to be covered? I think our Aboretum should do something like this because their visitors drop off in the winter too. I think you showed remarkable restraint in the number of pictures you shared (won't comment on the number of picture you took because I would have gone bonker too :). I look forward to more of these posts. It would seem to me that you and the SP must be doing well if you can take trips like this. That makes me happy for you. I know, I know ... it's not perfect yet, but baby steps, right? Love this post ... I may make a blanket for one of my trees ... maybe we could start a new fad, ya think? Be well, EC and thank you for perking up my day ...

    Andrea @ From The Sol

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    1. Andrea Priebe: I *think* the dragon trees are covered for protection - theirs not ours. The summer cages are open and probably protect them from marauding roos. The winter protection is probably against frost. I hope in later years they are freed.
      And I loved the decorated trees and would love to see it become a trend - like yarn bombing.
      His high and skinniness has good days and bad days - so we make the most of the good ones.

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  6. How colorful and fun! I'm sure the trees felt very fashionable. :) Poor dragons...caged like that... At least the cages had some flair. I love all your photos!

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    1. River Fairchild: Quirky fun is always a winner in my book. And I do hope the dragons are released next season - or escape.

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  7. The trunks are in need of warming up, and the bee hives too. I love them EC.

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    1. Bob Bushell: It made me smile. Widely.

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  8. Some folks were quite creative with the tree cozys.

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    1. Delores: 'Tree cozys' is a WONDERFUL term. Thank you.

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  9. My word some people are creative. What a lovely place to be. I love trees. We have so many trees around our house that you can barely see it. Just the way we like it too :)

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    1. Wendy: I love trees too. And there are over 35,000 planted at the Arboretum. Bliss.

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  10. one wonders about those lurking dragons! Fun post


    ALOHA from Honolulu
    ComfortSpiral
    =^..^= . <3 . >< } } (°>

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    1. Cloudia: I have a huge soft spot for dragons and I am really looking forward to the time the Dragon Trees are released.

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  11. While I have great respect for our Eucalypts, how interesting it is to see groups of other trees. I've no idea what a Dragon Tree looks like but I am prepared to wait for the unveiling. The decoration is a good way to get people visiting.

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  12. I have never seen such things...but it is all interesting. Did you knit something too?

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    1. Bookie: I am not a knitter, so there is nothing there from me - except lingering smiles.

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  13. So funny - what a great idea! I would love to meet the person who made the little leaves on some of the wraps/scarves. They're very quirky :)

    I can well imagine how cold it was - we've had snow on our mountains this week, which very rarely happens. The winds have been coming from there - and not in a lazy way!
    I hope both you and HRS are having a good day today.

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    1. Alexia: I really liked the leaves too. Some of the scarves had bobbles as well.
      I know you hate the cold - so I hope those winds ease off for you.

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  14. Well that was different, we have had some cold days bet the trees like a warm up too.
    Merle..........

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    1. Merlesworld: Trees deserve a cuddle too.

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  15. Is it bad of me that I was imagining the Dragon Trees as cat climbing structures?

    A colorful walk through trees sounds nice. Actually, as it is summer here, your brisk chill sounds nice too… I hope it was, indeed, a good day.

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    1. Paper Chipmunk (aka Ellen): You are not bad on your own. Both Jazz n Jewel would have loved playing with the scarves and climbing the dragon enclosures. And cool days are bliss.

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  16. hgat a good way to protect the trees love the cork oaks

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    1. Linda Starr: I love all of the forests that have been planted. I will be long gone before they reach their full potential - but it will be amazing.

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  17. I'm not sure what I think about wrapping trees up in woolen scarves (and I'll probably sound like an old grouch)....but...I think there are probably a lot of needy children who would get more comfort from them. I hope the knitted items do get passed onto children where they'll do more good.

    Dragon Trees are so fascinating...I look forward to following the progress of these.

    Have a great week, EC...and best wishes to The Skinny One. :)

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    1. Lee: Not a grouch at all. Concerned. I don't think these knitted items will keep people warm. After a month outside they will probably be very tired. Mind you I don't think it is an either or question. I hope, trust, believe that people who knit for disadvantaged people will continue to do so.
      And I too am looking forward to seeing more of the Dragon Trees.

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  18. What a colorful place with all that fun "yarn bombing!" (I won't show this to our northern Wyoming trees, they will likely snicker and make snide remarks about what weenies Aussie trees are, having to wear scarves and hats and sweaters and mittens, but it would only be because they're jealous!) :-) The views where those dragon trees are are really beautiful!

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    1. Laloofah: The whole Arboretum is beautiful. It has been reclaimed after a disastrous fire and lots and lots of forests planted - for the benefit of generations yet to come.
      And of course your trees believe ours are wusses. And weenies. And vain...

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  19. I love this! And it's much like yarn bombing, as you mentioned, which I also love. And if it brings more public interest and support to the Arboretum, that is wonderful, as this planet needs all the trees it can get. Looking forward to more pictures!

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    1. jenny_o: The Arboretum is a joy. And I hope they continue to plant many, many more trees. You might be sorry about asking for more pictures though. There are a lot.

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  20. Really pretty! One picture did make me think of a whole lot of Malays having bandaged up rubber trees in a plantation after milking them. But that is just me.

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    1. J Cosmo Newbery: But do those rubber trees get quite such colourful bandages?

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  21. I was looking at the tree scarves and thinking I could use a scarf myself right now, since the breeze is cold and I have both doors open for Angel to sit and watch birds and people, then I remembered the coat rack behind the door is draped in at least six scarves, so now I have a nice warm neck.
    I love the dragon trees decorations too, but why are they covered? Are they too young and small to withstand the elements yet? I hope they all make it to full growth.

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    1. River: Due to a mishap when the skinny one cooked a coffee pot this morning we have every door and window in the house open. The smoke has cleared - but the lingering smell of plastic persists.
      I am glad that the scarves reminded you - and that you are now cosy.
      I think the Dragon Trees are being protected from frost. They are still young, and that is an exposed hill side they are on. And I too hope they survive. All of them.

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  22. Sweaters for trees! SQUEEEEE!!!!!! So cute! And wow, such scenery. Beauty photos, EC.

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    1. Cathy Oliffe-Webster: The arboretum is beautiful - and yes, I loved the tree decorations as well. Delores put it best - tree cosies.

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  23. This is wonderful, EC!! You have such a lovely Arboretum to visit, and it's great to see that it is loved and celebrated, even in winter.
    Love these images. Yes, more to come, please :)

    Here, we sometimes have the "guerilla knitters" or yarn bombers/wooly artists hit the streets under the cover of darkness, and when we visit our little cafe on the mountain in the morning, there are bursts of tactile colour. I love it.
    It's fun to see the odd human statue, "dressed" with a pair of eighties-style knitted leg warmers, or have a jaunty beret popped on their head. Or, a drab bus shelter bench, bedecked with beautiful bouclé yarn.
    It's a nice surprise in the middle of a grey winter. Those with a good sense of humour "get it". And it's fun.
    I've seen tree trunks tastefully wrapped in rich red yarn, with burgundy crochet balls hanging from the branches - as pretty as a Christmas tree.
    Art installments such as these are created by fabric artists - for art's sake.
    I've heard people walk by and tut-tut, asking, "what's the point"? Well, it'd be like asking an artist to put their creative skills to something more "practical". Like asking Monet to slap a coat of that blue paint on the old church house after he'd finished his famous "Water Lilies".
    As George Bernard Shaw said, “without art, the crudeness of reality would make the world unbearable.”

    These knitters also do an amazing job contributing knitted items for hospitals, Salvation Army and the homeless - walking the streets, freely giving their handmade work to those who need it.

    I love that Canberra's friends of the Arboretum have created this innovative installation :)

    And..... do I see snow on the Brindabellas? Gorgeous.

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    1. Vicki: You do indeed see snow on the Brindibellas. And there has been a lot of it this year. I do love our hill line, and the snow is 'icing' on the cake.
      Yarn bombing makes me smile. As does unexpected public art. Food for the soul, the eyes, the mind, the heart.
      I am really pleased that you enjoyed coming back to the Arboretum with me. It was a weekday when we went - and crowded. Which was magic.

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  24. Neat! Yarn bombing hasn't made it's way to Canada yet, but when it does, I'm gonna knit something!

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    1. Karen: I can't knit so can only admire. Perhaps you could introduce yarn bombing to your little part of Canada? And start the ball (of yarn) rolling.

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  25. Worlds of wonder!! I have never heard of such things. Thank you for sharing.

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  26. I'm laughing you wanting to release the dragons! I'd be just the same. All in a good cause though the covering up. And how marvellous do the trees you can see look? Love trees I do, and those with scarfs look like Dr Who (the seventies Dr Who Tom Baker) has been to visit and left them a present. It's a great idea. I want to see the rest too when you're ready *smiles.

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    1. All Consuming: Of course Tom Baker. Thank you - something was nagging at my head - and you nailed it.

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  27. This is a really fun thing to do, and especially fun to see in your pictures! And the Dragon Trees actually look like dragons when they are spiffed up. Thank you for the smiles. Glad the SP is having some good days. Hope they become more than the bad ones. Hugs to you. :-)

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    1. DJan: It was a delight. And I really don't need an excuse to visit the Arboretum which is beautiful.

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  28. I don't think I am familiar with the Dragon tree. I would love to visit Canberra again sometime and take in the arboretum. Thank you for taking us again EC.

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    1. Carol in Cairns: As well as the vile politicians (who aren't here all the time) Canberra has some magic. And the arboretum is just going to get better and better.

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  29. This is so amazingly Wonderful!! I would love to visit, but I am so glad to at least have seen these photos! THanks for sharing!!

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    1. Susan F.: Many more photos coming up.

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    1. Author R. Mac Wheeler: Trees are a life saver - and beautiful with it.

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  31. I love the whimsy of the Dragon Trees, EC, and why not take a kazillion photos, it's a lot cheaper now than in the past. We who take photos are recording history and subjects that may or may not endure. Very nice photo spread.

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    1. Thank you for asking about hubs, it's breaking my heart to see him so ill, but he is making small advances, slowly. I go to the hospital every day. Just to be sure they look after him, but I can be vocal if needed.

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    2. D.G. Hudson: I am glad to hear that your husband is making small steps in the right direction. I went to the hospital twice each day while the smaller portion was incarcerated - and all too often raised my voice. Not a pleasant time for either of us.
      And I too love the Dragon Trees. And all of the Arboretum.

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  32. That's amazing, quirky, odd, and wonderful. Love the colorful tree warmers!

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    1. Strayer: It is fun isn't it? And a bit of fun never goes astray.

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  33. Must be cold out. All the trees have their leg warmers on.

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    1. John Wiswell: Chilly by world standards, but the trees were not alone in having leg warmers on. Lots of the human visitors were well rugged up too.

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  34. I have the same restrained nature when it comes to taking pictures at cool places. ;) I think this is cool.

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    1. mail4rosey: It also has the advantage that I am almost guaranteed of getting at least a few shots I like. Except on an outing we took yesterday when I had an epic fail.

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  35. How fun to decorate the trees this way! I love the added color. Perhaps I should do this with my trees as well (I only have a few!).

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    1. Carola Bartz: Start a trend on your side of the world? It would be fun. Though your garden is already a joy.

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  36. Those are lovely trees you've shared today. I like those decorations. Happy week to you EC :)

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    1. DeniseinVA: They were fun - though I love trees anyway. A trip to the Arboretum is always a treat. And a happy week to you and Greg.

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  37. SO fun!
    I so much love the Dragon Trees! xxxxxxxxxxxxx KISSSSSSSSSS

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    1. My Inner Chick: So do I. And hugs back to you.

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  38. Oh what fun to see those colorful wraps hugging the trees. I'm a tree loving hugger myself.

    Be well, be happy ;)

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    1. Pam;): I am a merlot swilling, tree-hugging leftie myself.

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  39. A very happy Sunday Selection, EC! So pleased the Skinny One was able to go on such a lovely excursion.

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    1. Carol: So was I. It wasn't a big excursion - but we both had fun.

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  40. I love the scarves. What a fun addition to the scenery! I also like your use of the word "embiggen."

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    1. Stephanie Faris: The scarves brightened the scenery immeasurably. As quirkiness always does. I am pretty certain I purloined embiggen - but am not giving it back.

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  41. Good to know I'm not the only one who exercises restraint ;)

    What a lovely place, and it looks like it was the perfect day!

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    1. Riot Kitty: Restraint (like so many other virtues) is over-rated. But it is a glorious place. Whatever the time of the year.

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  42. That's sweet and strange. I like the concept of doing something heartfelt to nurture the trees. Has it brought more visitors? I hope so.

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    1. Rawknrobyn: I hope so. There were a LOT of visitors when we were there - which for a mid week winter visit was lovely to see.
      And trees are such a gift. To us all. This generation and those to come.

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  43. Love this! The scenery is gorgeous, the wraps are lovely. And I'm thinking the trees loved the extra attention :)

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    1. Carol Kilgore: Given how much trees give to us, I am more than happy to give them some attention, and appreciation. And a hug. Tree-hugging lefty is certainly part of any description of me.

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  44. I agree with Carol. I love trees and those wraps are like tree hugs :). Very cool pics!

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    1. Rula Sinara: Wasn't it a wonderful initiative. Quirky, fun, and showing appreciation.

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  45. Oh, I love those yarn-bombed trees!

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  46. I have actually seen cork oaks in southern Spain many yeatrs ago where they originated from . Only the best winemakers use the real cork, most cork nowadays is reconstituted pieces of cork(Glued) or some ersatz alternative. I am more interested in the contents of the bottles the corks arrive with.
    When I was small one of my hobbies was making floats for fishing in the brook or river, Using corks with a Goose feather minus fluff placed through up ad down the centre of the.cork and then decorated red an white.. Memories !.... Lovely Pics.

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    1. Vest: I prefer corks (even ersatz corks) to screw-tops, but like you am more interested in the contents. And we too made cork boats - and ones from walnut shells as well.

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  47. All I could think was: Release the Kraken!
    One wonders if those wee Dragon trees will grow up to become full-fledged Dragon Dandies? Is that just silly?
    Oh well; just as one must eat a peck of dirt to grow up healthy, (don't ask me, it's something the oldtimers used to say) one must indulge in a tonne of silliness to remain sane.
    What beautiful surroundings!

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    1. Jacquelineand...: Release the kraken, release the dragon(s). And I really, really hope that the baby dragons become fully fledged, powerful monsters.
      I was told that I had to eat a peck of dirt before I die... And silliness is part of me. A big part.

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  48. Love those dragon trees! Tails and all :-)

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  49. That must have made for a lot of chat and laughter - keeping trees warm!

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    1. Friko: It did. Chat, laugher and smiles. Which never goes astray.

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  50. Hey Sue,

    This was terrific, in fact, treemendous :) I have to keep my comment brief because I'm in a hectic time. Thus, this comment wont dragon.....

    Thank you, dear Sue.

    Gary

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    1. klahanie: Dear Gary, you are indeed in a hectic time. I hope the packing and moving and unpacking goes really, really well for you.
      Hugs.

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