Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Sunday, 19 June 2016

Sunday Selections #281

Sunday Selections was originally brought to us by Kim, of Frogpondsrock, as an ongoing meme where participants could post previously unused photos languishing in their files.
 
The meme is now continued by River at Drifting through life.  The rules are so simple as to be almost non-existent.  Post some photos under the title Sunday Selections and link back to River.  Clicking on any of the photos will make them embiggen.
 
Like River I usually run with a theme.   This week I am continuing my obsession with Fiona Hall.  In 1996 she was approached to create a sculpture for the Sculpture Garden at the National Gallery of Australia.  Instead she offered to design a garden.  And the Fiona Hall Fern Garden was born.  This link will take you to an essay about the garden.


We went back to the Gallery yesterday to track it down.  It is not the way I had pictured a fern garden.  But then we are talking a Fiona Hall creation.

It can be viewed from within the Gallery, or within the garden itself.  We did both.

First, looking out of the picture windows and down on the garden...





And now for photos from the garden itself.  It is tucked away and not easy to find (doors from within the Gallery itself are only open on weekends).  I am glad we made the effort though.  Very glad.








Details from one of the pathways.




I am pretty certain this is a dandelion growing on the tree trunk.  Planted or windblown?  Considering the designer both are options.








It was raining when we visited but I can see just how inviting this space could be on a hot day.  Or even a cool one.  It was a remarkably peaceful spot.  A hidden gem.

123 comments:

  1. I'm not sure why, but I expected more of a natural, mossy look.Perhaps when it ages...
    Or perhaps I'm just used to scrambling around my tree ferns!

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    1. dinahmow: I expected something completely different too. And hadn't even thought of tree ferns. I loved the moss on the trunks though. And the lichen.

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  2. This reminds me of the many hidden rooftop gardens (gems) in the SF financial district.
    thank you

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    1. Martin Kloess: A garden is heart balm. Often.

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    1. fishducky: Aren't they? I liked the 'kissing' trunks too.

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  4. Beautiful images, the pathway is fun, is it a pair of eyes? The trees, the garden, and the gates, fabulous.

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    1. Bob Bushell: That part of the pathway does look like eyes doesn't it? Which I hadn't seen till I took the close-up.

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  5. Quite well done and very low maintenance. Aren't the gates interesting too.

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    1. Andrew: I really liked the gates. To get to it you had to wander round the back and through the staff car park. I expect those gates are mostly seen by staff and the garden itself largely empty except on weekends when the doors from the gallery are opened.

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  6. When my ex and I lived at Sunshine Beach we had a couple of lovely tree ferns growing...they're beautiful.

    Have a great week ahead, EC...and cuddles to Jazz and Jewel. :)

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    1. Lee: They are beautiful things. And seem to be doing well in our climate - which is very different to that of Sunshine Beach. We are expecting more rain in the week to come. I am happy. The cats are not.

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  7. How cool is Fiona Hall! She has one called Bondi beach. That is really neat. I read that she has a lecturing position at the South Australian School of Art. Really enjoy her art. You are so blessed to have these galleries. The ferns are amazing!

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    1. Ginger Dawn Harman: I am ashamed that she hadn't crossed my consciousness before this exhibition. I certainly don't 'like' all of her work, or even understand it, but it gets me thinking...

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  8. When I was in NZ I saw lots and lots of tree ferns, but I can't remember seeing them in Australia. This is a spectacular garden, I love the twisty shapes of the trunks of the trees, is that natural or have they been encouraged to turn like that? And the gates are really nice.... a different designer for the gates or the same Fiona Hall?

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    1. Shammickite: The gates are Fiona Hall's design too. And are 'a schematic representation of the female reproductive system'. Your comment reminded me that I had intended to put a link about the garden in the post. And it is there now.
      I suspect the trees have been encouraged to twist and turn.

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  9. Me again.... after reading about the Fiona Hall exhibition and the fern garden, I decided to google her and find out more, and I discovered that she was the artist who made the "Sardine can" sculptures that I admired so much when I was at the ACT Art Gallery in 1993. This is a quote from a web site about her...."Hall is arguably best known for her erotic sardine can series, Paradisus Terrestris. First appearing in 1990, this three-part series depicts the intersection of plant and human culture. Within each half-opened can sits a naked human body part, while plant life sprouts above. Beneath these top two layers, Hall adds language. The three systems make us consider what we share with plants." I was so intrigued with these sardine can sculptures that I leaned in too far and set off an alarm and got scolded by the security guard!

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    1. Shammickite: The sardine can sculptures featured in the second room of her current exhibition. And photos of some of them will appear in my next post on Wednesday or Thursday. I was intriged by them - and barked my toe painfully on the wooden barrier there to stop people getting too close.

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  10. Wonderful to spend some time with you at one of your places,

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  11. Really interesting - I love the twisted tree ferns, and the pebble mosaic. It would be a lovely place to sit and look - if it wasn't raining, preferably!

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    1. Alexia: The rain was gentle while we were there. I couldn't sit on the benches, but I could (and did) enjoy it.

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  12. It does look so beautiful and peaceful. Tree ferns have a sense of calmness and purpose about them that I love. The gates are very intriguing.

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    1. CountryMum: It is an incredibly peaceful spot. There were magpies in it when we first looked down.

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  13. Absolutely stunning! I am amazed at how unique and simply wonderful this place is. I love it!!! :-)

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    1. DJan: I liked it too. Not a garden I could/would grow for myself, but I loved visiting.

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  14. Such a treasure. It is hard to imagine that ferns could be so beautiful. We don't appreciate their beauty in nature where there is so much to distract us.

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    1. Marie Smith: The lichen and the moss moved me too. Hopefully over the years both will thrive.

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  15. Now there's a place I could happily spend an hour or three. I love the gates too.

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    1. River: And only twenty people are 'allowed' in the garden at anyone time. Admittedly it was damp when we were there but we saw no indication that anyone else was interested. Their loss.

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  16. The gates are very different.
    I like all the odd looking trees.
    Merle.........

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    1. Merlesworld: I liked the gates and wish I had thought to close them for photographic purposes.

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  17. Lovely and odd, somewhat reminiscent of Florida.

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    1. The Cranky: Much of Fiona Hall's work is odd. But thought provoking.

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  18. Definitely a dandelion. One of our neighbours have a lawn made up from them, they then migrate over the fence to form yet another ghetto of uninvited weeds.
    Nice Pics.

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    1. Vest: I have a soft spot for dandelions. I know they are a weed, but still smile at the clocks. I resist the temptation to blow them though.

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  19. So beautiful and serene...Nice to know of Fiona Hall.

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    1. e: One more post on her work to come. She is such a varied artist. And that garden is definitely serene. I am sorry the fountains weren't playing... Next visit perhaps.

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  20. What a gem! Too bad it's hidden away and hard to find. Even her fern placement is thought provoking.

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    1. River Fairchild: Part of me likes that it is a secret garden. And having found it from the inside it was always going to be found from the outside as well.

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  21. How so structurally beautiful!
    The serenity is felt even through your photos.

    What a wonderful place to walk in and just breathe in the peace.

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    1. Vicki: Peace, precious peace. We all need more of it.

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  22. How breathtakingly beautiful! The tree ferns. And then the gate just blew me away.

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    1. Nilanjana Bose: The gate is very special isn't it? And the garden intriguing.

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  23. Tree ferns are so temperamental to grow. I imagine the courtyard provides the shelter they need from wind and a micro-climate to maintain the moisture they need. I would be intrigued to see the garden lit up at night. I cant decide whether it would look magical or haunting ~ but it is nice to imagine from your photos EC.

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    1. carol in cairns: I suspect whether the garden looks haunting or magical at night will depend on mood - and the colour of the light. We wondered whether it is lit up every day or just for special occasions.

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  24. Definitely interesting. I don't think I've seen a garden like this before. Not to mention all of them are very crooked and gnarled.

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    1. Robert Bennett: I suspect the trunks had help in acquiring those leans, but it is interesting. And different.

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  25. Thanks for sharing these magnificent photos of this garden.
    I've never seen anything like it and I can feel the peacefulness when I look at the pictures.

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    1. Glenda Beall: I too felt the serenity and, as I said to Vicki, we all need peace at the moment. And always.

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  26. amazing those tree ferns are growing among the buildings and I loved the dandelion

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    1. Linda Starr: I would love to see the dandelion in flower on the tree trunk.

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  27. Sue I am so glad you went back to see the Galery. The treee ferns are tremendous and I love the whole design of the place.

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    1. Margaret Adamson: The Gallery is a delightful place. With a whole lot more to explore. This visit we noticed some other areas we want to check out...

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  28. Heips Sue, these photos really are lovely. The garden looks beautiful with those big fern trees (never seen).
    Kisses.

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    1. orvokki: Thank you. I hope life is treating you more kindly. Hugs.

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  29. Hi EC - it looks just beautiful - love the touches .. the lichen, the creative living art works ... tree ferns are extraordinary ... having seen them in SA, and then loving life in the bomb craters ... nature creates ... cheers Hilary

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    1. Hilary Melton-Butcher: Nature is amazing isn't she? And lichen and mosses fascinate me.

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  30. There is something very peaceful about being around ferns. They remind me of secret places where you hide away from all the noise.

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    1. Starting Over, Accepting Changes - Maybe: I suspect ferns haven't changed all that much either. A very early life form which has been sufficiently successful to survive and thrive. And I like the thought of secret places.

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  31. Those trees are so interesting I've never seen trees like that ! Love all the ironwork too!

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    1. Dawn@Lighten Up!: They are intriguing aren't they? And that gate is very, very special.

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  32. What a neat idea! I was a little surprised there weren't ground ferns, but I suppose the designer had her reasons? Anyway, love the shot of the stone-work pebbles! Thanks for sharing.

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    1. Carolyn McBride: I had expected ground ferns too. And a bigger range of types as well. She had her reasons, and the simplicity has a kind of elegance.

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  33. Thanks for sharing this hidden gem with us. The garden looks pretty from afar but I just love the pictures from within it. It looks so interesting and unique. And definitely peaceful! :)
    ~Jess

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    1. DMS ~ Jess: Very, very peaceful. Something we all need.

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  34. That definitely looks peaceful and a great place to relax after a stressful day. Lovely photos.

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    1. Mason Canyon: Isn't it nice to think that there are havens of peace about?

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  35. Replies
    1. Sue in Italia/In the Land Of Cancer: I really like that gate too. And may have to go back and see if the dandelion flowers on the tree trunk. If I do I will try and take a photograph of the gate while it is closed to get the whole picture.

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  36. Replies
    1. Author R. Mac Wheeler: It is. And on that day the temperature was cool too. Which I love.

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  37. Wow! What an incredibly amazing garden!!!

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    1. Nicky HW: It is very different isn't it?

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  38. Amazing is probably the most-used word in all these comments. I especially liked the detail of a path since I have recently designed my own path to the mail/paper boxes. You are a patron of the arts, for sure. Thanks for sharing with the rest of the world.

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    1. Patricia A. Laster: I am an appreciator. Big time. And artists (whatever their genre) fill me with awe. And gratitude. Are you pleased with the path you designed? I hope so.

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  39. Looks like dandelion to me too. Hey, do you ever drink dandelion root tea? I enjoy it a great deal.

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    1. The Happy Whisk: I have drunk dandelion root tea, but it is not my favourite. Mind you, it was very old and probably stale. Some time I will try again.

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    2. I've had the root and then the leaves/root and I enjoyed the root better. Though, I want to yank some from my own yard, dry them out and give them a go.

      Happy Weekend.

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  40. I so love this - and thank you for including the link to the description of how and why she designed the garden as she did. I wasn't even sure they were real trees until I read they were indeed. Fascinating! I'm glad you went, and then brought it back to us as well.

    Hope you and the SP and the two J's have a good week, EC.

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    1. jenny_o: She is an intriguing woman isn't she? And seems to have a very strong relationship with our first people. Which I love and admire.
      A great week to you and yours as well.

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  41. Lovely pictures

    http://shilpachandrasekheran.blogspot.ae/?m=1

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    1. Shilpa Chandrasekheran: Thank you. The National Art Gallery is a lovely place.

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  42. Such awesome photos. Thanks for sharing!

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    1. Nas: Thank you. I am very glad we went back to the gallery and tracked this garden down.

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  43. There's such a lot of movement in your photos - wonderful:-)

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  44. Interesting how the trees grow in such odd ways.

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    1. mshatch: I suspect they had 'help' in assuming those shapes.

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  45. I love gardens! This one comes across as cool and serene.

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    1. Sandra Cox: Serene it certainly is. And probably a haven of coolness in our sweaty season.

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    2. We've had some pockets of horrific heat too. Arizona has been dangerously hot.

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    3. Sandra Cox: It is (finally) winter here. And I am in no hurry for summer to return.

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  46. What a perfect place to hang out. Yes, a perfect gem!! It seems you have more gems around you than I do. LOl

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    1. Sonya Ann: Different gems. Not more, not better.

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  47. That place is a gem! And so interesting that the tree ferns look like palm trees. Amazing work.

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    1. Lynn: Her work is so incredibly varied. And like it or loathe it, she doesn't do boring.

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  48. Wow, I'm a major tree fan, of all makes and kinds, and these you've shared with us, are just amazing. I could really design quite the relaxing garden with them if only, but Minnesota would be far too hard for them to survive!

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    1. Karen S.: Given our chilly winters I am a bit surprised that they have done so well. The courtyard between the buildings has its own micro-climate I suppose.

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  49. I was struck by the patterns all of your pictures captured. Absolutely beautiful and in keeping with the idea of connecting and flowing through life.

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    1. cleemckenzie: Life is going to proceed anyway - so we might as well celebrate the beauty.

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  50. What a fairyland of a garden....I love it.
    The tiny stones in the pathway - gorgeous.
    It's a balmy stroll, walking along with you.
    Thanks for sharing the beauty from your window:)
    -Jennifer

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    1. Jennifer Richardson: We all need those balmy strolls don't we? Hugs.

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  51. You have so much neat and beautiful stuff nearby!

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    1. Riot Kitty: I think so. My city is widely condemned as boring, but I believe the critics to be wrong. Very wrong.

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  52. Cracking little garden, I like the bendy trees a lot. Great piccies hon x

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    1. All Consuming: Trees are a gift aren't they?

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  53. What a gem with all those ferns, looking like small trees! Lovely.

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    1. Lady Fi: It is. Not, as I have said what I expected, but with a charm of its own.

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  54. Replies
    1. Lux G.: I do love gardens. And marvel at how different they can be.

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  55. Interesting design with the trees. I like the gate and the designs on the pathway...certainly a calmer theme for Fiona than from you last post. But, as with all art, it's all in the beholder's eyes, heart and mind, as to what is taken away.

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    1. Terri @ Coloring Outside the Lines: All of us need some peace in our lives. And Fiona Hall's head strikes me as a crowded and sometimes frightening place. I am so glad that she also has serenity.

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  56. OMG. Dandelions are taking over the world.

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    1. Sandra Cox: Mind you, I can think of worse things to take over the world...

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  57. I remember running through ferns during my youth chasing my brother. What made this such a memorable event apart from all tomfoolery is the ferns were taller than us and we were lost. All I could hear was the sounds of waves, so we kept going until a beach opened up before us. I was amazed but Paul pretended this was part of the plan. Typical I say! He was as lost as me but being the elder one he just wouldn't admit it and grinned sheepishly.

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    1. Spacer Guy: Brothers are like that. I think that only one of my brothers can ever admit he is wrong - and none of them are ever, ever lost.

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  58. Thank you for sharing this hidden gem. It is beautiful. I feel so lucky that you go to all these interesting and artful places. It's as if I too go on your trips.

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    1. Myrna R.: Thank you. Just one more trip with Fiona Hall. For the moment.

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  59. That is absolutely fascinating and not at all the way I'd imagine a fern garden, she seems to have created sculptures after all, living sculptures.

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    1. Kim: I am sorry it has taken me so long to respond. I think you are exactly right about the living sculptures. Next time you are in town I hope you can see it for yourself.

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    2. No worries EC, it took exactly a month for my 'lost' comment to be spotted. Great idea about visiting the garden, your town always has fascinating things to offer.

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    3. Kim: We have a reputation for being boring. I think it is wrong. Very wrong.

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