Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Wednesday, 22 June 2016

Wrong Way Time continued

Last week I posted about Fiona Hall's Wrong Way Time exhibition at our National Gallery.  Confronting, confusing, emotive...

And today I am going back to that exhibition for the third post about her work.  Most of the images will be less confronting this time.  Most but not all.  There was beauty and whimsy as well.  And a couple of images of things which made me laugh.  Which some of you may not like at all.  And yes, confusion was there too.

As is often the case with my posts, lots of photos follow.

Some more or less random snippets to start.




The spiders in the diorama above moved... 


Another from Crust, again made of bread.



I don't know what these next installations represent, but they fascinated me.  And the shadows they cast caught my eye too.






Then to some concertina books.  Her range is incredible isn't it?

The concertina books were made during the passing of Halley's comet and the launch of the Giotta satellite.  The first represents outer space, and the second limbo.






 And just one last section now.  

Canned things are a recurring theme throughout her work.  I was revelling in the detail of the metal plants on the top of these cans - and then focused on what was inside them.   Plants 'personified'.  You may need to embiggen (click on the image) to get the detail.  Some made me laugh, others smile and a few tugged at my heart strings.

Cabbage


Old Man Banskia


Pear


Such a talented woman.  In so many arenas...

129 comments:

  1. I like the dragonfly. That's cool.
    The spiders moved? Not good for someone with arachnophobia.

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    1. Alex J. Cavanaugh: Fiona Hall doesn't play nicely with rather a lot of people's fears. Or, I suspect, her own.

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  2. Hahaha! Wonder how many will "get" the cabbage humour.Thank you for taking us along.

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    1. dinahmow: Some day you will get here and we can explore...

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  3. Thank you for letting me tsg along. The shadpw pieces must have been fascinating. Appreciate this

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    1. Martin Kloess: I was completely fascinated by the shadows. In these pieces and in some of her other installations.

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  4. Thank you for sharing. Great photos.

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  5. She is so unique I have to like it! Spiders moving? and things made of bread, then the cabbage was beautiful!

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    1. Kim @ stuffcould...: Some artists once you have a familiarity with some of their work you can recognise it anywhere. She is so varied I think I will continue to be surprised by her. And awed. And sometimes horrified.

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  6. I really enjoyed looking at the show with you. My favorites though are the skeleton face cuckoo clocks you had in the first part of your blog. I used to collect clocks, still have them until I can sell most before we move, and have a “regular” cuckoo clock which my daughter wants, and can have. But if it were a skeleton face cuckoo clock I’d have a hard time parting with it. This lady is certainly very talented – it must have been so much fun looking at her art.

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    1. Vagabonde: Looking at her work was confronting. And compelling. I am so glad to have 'found' her. I don't think I would choose her skeleton clocks first, but now I am wondering...

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  7. I'd have to walk by the moving spiders *shudder* but I love the hanging insects and their shadows, Very cool!

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    1. mshatch: I didn't even see the moving spiders until my second visit. I don't think my spider phobic partner did either.

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  8. When I am challenged by work such as Fiona's, I wonder what people in centuries to come will see in it.

    I would like to see it in person. Great coverage of the exhibit!

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    1. Marie Smith: What an interesting perspective to take. And yes, you have reminded me of just how many of those whose work we regard as masterpieces now were considered rubbish at the time they were created. Sometimes dangerous offensive 'rubbish'.

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  9. I love "different" art--I wish I could have been there with you!!

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    1. fishducky: I wish you could have been with me too.

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  10. Her works are not decorative, or trite, but rather each one immediately evokes response and thought, speaking to ideas and associations. . . Guess I liked them too!

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    1. Cloudia: Some are decorative - but the decorative part is 'as well as', and not the entirity. Which I loved.

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  11. The spiders moved? That is creepy!

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    1. Birdie: The spiders scuttled over the diorama. And I have no idea how it was done...

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    2. computerised image? Magnetised?

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    3. River: Computerised image seems most likely - but was the only area I saw any evidence of it.

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  12. Not your usual boring art, that is for sure. The creativity is off the charts and talent in many area. The dragonfly carrying chains or caught in chains or a web, now I like that. Limbo, getting lost in the matrix of space and time, I can relate, as sometimes I feel like we are swimming in plasmic soup.

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    1. Strayer: Like her, love her, or loathe her I don't think anyone could say Fiona Hall's work is boring. And yes, to the swimming in plasmic soup.

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  13. She is just amazing. I hope the exhibition comes here.

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  14. Ah, just had a proper look at the last two photos.

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    1. Andrew: And what did you think? I thought Old Man Banskia was incredibly tender.

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  15. I really like the second image which resembles a parasol. I'm such a simple person......

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    1. River: Not simple at all. And I liked that image too, though I wasn't certain about its meaning.

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    2. The universe is the umbrella that covers all things?

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    3. River: That makes sense. A lot of sense. And I love that she made it a beautiful universe.

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  16. It never ceases to amaze the way people's minds work.

    I know my own works in mysterious ways...too mysterious to even attempt to explain sometimes! ;)

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    1. Lee: Oh I agree. Minds work (or don't work) in such very indiviual ways.

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  17. Wow...I look at some of her work and think I'm not sure what to think and the other stuff kind of creeps me out. I love the shadows, too. I hope you're having a good week!

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    1. e: Oh yes. Some of her work I find very, very distressing. And some makes me think and some I don't understand. I am very glad to have found her though. A reasonable week so far, but it is about to get very, very busy. I hope yours is good.

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  18. I am fascinated most by the last one - I saw a menorah immediately. And the shadows are intriguing.

    Be well, my friend.

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    1. Rawknrobyn: I saw the menorah too. And I am so glad that others are drawn to the shadows.

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  19. Hi EC - gosh I'd love to see those ... I love the shadow ones and all her creative ideas - the Banksia always 'touches' me ... cheers Hilary

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    1. Hilary Melton-Butcher: The shadows are amazing aren't they? And there were other fascinating shadows too.

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  20. Awesome...and its all so intriguing.

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  21. Interesting, My favourite would be the Dragonfly with its shadow

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    1. Margaret Adamson: Incredible isn't it?

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  22. Dear EC
    More intriguing work. She is multi-talented to be able to work in so many different media.
    Best wishes
    Ellie

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    1. Ellie Foster: I was blown away by her expert use of so many different mediums.

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  23. A fascinating exhibit to say the least. You could spend days looking at those pieces and see something different each time. Thanks for sharing.

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    1. Mason Canyon: And each visit I suspect you would see a piece (or several pieces) which you had somehow 'missed'. I did anyway.

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  24. So totally amazing. I love it ALL!!

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    1. Granny Annie: I was blown away. Lots of it is confronting, but amazing just the same.

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  25. I think I said Wow last time, and I will say Wow again this time. Thank you so much for giving us a glimpse into this artist and her work EC.

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    1. carol in cairns: It was a multi WOW exhibition for us.

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  26. Fantastic artwork...so much talent and variety of styles. I would have loved to have see the exhibition. Thanks for sharing!

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    1. Sienna Smythe: So much talent is right. And dedication.

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  27. Interesting.
    Kind of mind blowing! xx

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    1. My Inner Chick: Definitely mind blowing. Hugs.

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  28. She certainly is talented and rather amazing. Wow and wow again. I like those dragonflies and canned "fruit" very much. Thank you for sharing her art with me. :-)

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    1. DJan: Talented, amazing, and definitely not to everyone's taste. I am super impressed and glad that you found pieces you liked lots.

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  29. amazing work and amazingly talented, the spider one reminded me of my spider morning recently, ugh

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    1. Linda Starr: The spider one was very small and I didn't see it at all on our first visit.

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  30. I had to take my time to study these before commenting.i need to see this up close and personal. The pieces that cast the shadows blew me away.

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    1. Anne in the kitchen: I took lots and lots and lots of photos of that one. And its shadows. From all angles. The security guard was sitting nearby and obviously thought I was nuts.

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  31. Really talented. That gallery is really inviting.

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    1. dumcho wangdi: The gallery has some incredible exhibitions. Some permanent, and others like this one on a temporary basis.

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  32. I LOVE the shadows that they cast. It would be different from every angle. Such a great idea and so talented.

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    1. Sonya Ann: The shadows fascinated me. And there were indeed different from every angle.

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  33. Whimsy and confusion go hand in hand with me, and when it has to do with art it's becoming a more interesting style to me. I really like standing back and see if I can even come close to the what the artist was feeling. This is quite the place, I'm so happy you're sharing it with us. I wanted to pick one favorite of all these but I can't.... they all have their special uniqueness!

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    1. Karen S.: Some pieces were relatively straight forward (I think) and others took me a whole lot of thought.

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  34. Okay I take that thought back. Photo number five still has me coming back wondering, what is happening here?!

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    1. Karen S.: Crust had lots of heart-breaking images. Sculptures made from bread resting on world atlases showing sites of political, cultural and envirnonmental crisis. And sadly the gun (and other weapons) fits too comfortably on lots of the map.

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  35. Wow, photographs are brilliant, excellent EC.

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    1. Bob Bushell: Thank you. Some of them.

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    1. Ginger Dawn Harman: I am so glad we went to the exhibition.

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  37. Her mind must race with ideas. But, then she is so meticulous in the execution. Fabulous.

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    1. Susan Kane: I don't know how she lives in her head and am awed at the multitude of ways she expresses things. And yes, meticulous is right.

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  38. I absolutely ADORE the first one!!! The shadow art is exceptional as well.

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    1. River Fairchild: There was a whole row of them. Intricate, convoluted and amazing.

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  39. Wow! Art that really makes me think. Such a unique style to her work. The shadows cast by the hanging works is so cool. The concertina books are amazing. Thanks so much for sharing these photos with us. :)
    ~Jess

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    1. DMS ~ Jess: She got me thinking too. Not always comfortable thoughts but I am grateful for the challenge.

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  40. What an astonishing collection. I would have loved to see it in person - thank you so much for letting us see such interesting pieces.

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    1. Alexia: I would have loved to have shared it in person with a LOT of bloggers.

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  41. The cans were definitely interesting:)

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    1. Sandra Cox: Weren't they? And so detailed. And intricate.

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    2. Good morning, well probably good evening there:)
      What is the image in the second picture made from?

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    3. Sandra Cox: It was late evening (just before midnight) when you left your comment. I think the image in the second was painted on glass. Think, but wouldn't swear to it.

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  42. I too felt rather challenged by her art. Being a soul who prefers simple things I'm not sure I would enjoy all of her work.
    I dread to think what it would be like to live in the mind of such an artist. What thoughts have her producing such unusual works of art? Can't help wondering but then that's simple old me. :)

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    1. Mimsie: I didn't 'enjoy' all her work either. And don't see how you could. Lots of it is thought-provoking, some of it I found heart-breaking and some of it incomprehensible. And there was beauty there too.
      Did you see her fern garden? Previous post? That might be more to your taste.

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    2. Yes, I really enjoyed her fern garden and would love to wander through it.

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    3. Mimsie: The fern garden is a haven of peace isn't it? Even in the rain.

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  43. I like the dragonfly work and the shadows. It's dragonfly season here (I think?) because we have dragonflies following us wherever we go. I've grown rather fond of them. :)

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    1. mail4rosey: I am very fond of dragon flies. Beautiful things.

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  44. I liked the dragonflies. I confess to not understanding the cabbage piece though. Art is so subjective, isn't it?

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    1. Carolyn McBride: Art (whatever genre) is indeed subjective. On the cabbage front? Think cabbage laced fart.

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  45. I went to the two posts before this one to see all of her art that you shared here. What a talent! She seems to be everywhere - it is fantastic. I really like her environmental pieces (the bread polar bear, the canned whale etc.) - very provocative, but in a way that resonates with me. I think she is an extremely talented, highly interesting artist. That fern garden is amazing - can you actually go in and walk around there? Oh, and I like the shadows of those fascinating creatures as well!

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    1. Carola Bartz: Her environmental pieces (and some of her other work) made my heart ache. And yes, I agree about her talent.
      You can walk around in the fern garden. The numbers are limited, but it is there to be walked in, sat in...

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  46. I think we already had the e-conversation about the sardine cans! I saw them in Canberra in 2003 and I am still fascinated by them. How did she ever think of creating such things? What actually goes on in her brain? Incredible. I've done quite a bit on internet research about Fiona Hall's work since you first mentioned her.... a very interesting person.
    The shadows of the dragonflies and insects are smashing (good british word).

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    1. Shammickite: Her brain is a crowded place isn't it? I am so glad she lets some of it out. And I do like rather a lot of british word usage. Chuffed is another one I am fond of.

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  47. As I said last time I am really intrigued by her work. Whimsical is a good description.:-) Thanks.

    Greetings from London.

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    1. A Cuban in London: Some of her work is indeed whimsical. And some packs a powerful punch. Or does for me.

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  48. A fascinating exhibit. Quite an extraordinary talent.

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  49. The art works demonstrate extreme creativity, but I don't understand any of them!

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    1. rhymeswithplague: Perhaps you needed to be there. Some of them I didn't understand (despite two separate visits) and some spoke very loudly to me.

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  50. She is so creative. I love that cabbage!

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  51. I love the fern garden, path and gate,(I must admit the rest is a bit beyond me) I could happily sit there for a while, even with the rain. It's coming down in buckets here and thundering, lovely.
    (off topic now)I just spent a while catching up on some of your blog; beautiful photos and flowers as always; A very impressive collection of ear rings, wow! And although we dont really have the weather here, the free use of BBQs in parks is such a brilliant idea, for anyone, but especially for the homeless. Very encouraging to read about people caring for the homeless.
    I hope both you and the SP are well xx

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    1. bugerlugs63: Lovely to see you out and about in the blogosphere. I am super impressed at my friends work, and stopped in to see her the other day on my way to LL. Our winter is here and there were a lot of people safe in the warmth benefiting from her work. How I wish that homes (or more safe places) could be found. It isn't BBQ weather here either - unless you have no choice.

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  52. There is so much creativity in this work. It is stunning. My favourite would have to be the dragonfly sculpture. Great photos!!

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    1. CountryMum: And weren't the shadows it cast amazing too?

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  53. Wow, when the Creator was handing out talent, she must have gotten in line multiple times. She has sooooo much talent. I liked the sculpture/shadow combos best. Very intriguing.

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    1. Susan: She was quick about ducking back into line and collecting the next talent wasn't she? Very, very quick.

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  54. You are a Genius EC.
    I noticed the ancient can openers, nothing like the ring pulls of today, so they must have been around awhile.

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    1. Vest: Not me. Fiona Hall perhaps. And I remember those cans too. As I am sure you do.

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  55. Yes she really does have incredible range...wow

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    1. Optimistic Existentialist: Wow was the way I felt too.

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  56. What an amazing artist, EC! Fiona Hall seems to have mastered everything that interests her. Thank you so much for sharing these three fabulous episodes of your visits.

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    1. Carol: Is it wrong of me to think how unfair, while acknowledging that she has obviously worked very hard at mastering her talents?

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  57. Love seeing all these photos. Number two spoke to me the most. And now, I'm off to make flatbread (spelt), so we can have it with homemade peanut butter and for me, with tea.

    Here's to a good weekend.

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    1. The Happy Whisk: Home made flatbread? And homemade peanut butter? Yum.

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  58. Very intriguing art! Somehow the gun made of bread is staying in my mind, as I try to work out what she might have meant by using this medium. Thank you for sharing these. They aren't something I would ever see around here.

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    1. jenny_o: The effects of the global food and money markets are an ongoing 'sub-theme' in a lot of her work.

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    2. Ahh ... I'll add that to my thoughts; thanks.

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  59. These are all so wonderful - and you get to go back again! Nice.

    The dragonfly (riding a bicycle?) is my favorite.

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    1. Lynn: I am so grateful for our National Gallery. I think there is something here for everyone. And lots here for lots of us.

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