Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Sunday, 4 September 2016

Sunday Selections #292

Sunday Selections was originally brought to us by Kim, of Frogpondsrock, as an ongoing meme where participants could post previously unused photos languishing in their files.
 
The meme is now continued by River at Drifting through life.  The rules are so simple as to be almost non-existent.  Post some photos under the title Sunday Selections and link back to River.  Clicking on any of the photos will make them embiggen.
 
Like River I usually run with a theme.   This week?  Wildlife.  Again.


This first photo isn't one of mine.  The youngest of my brothers is an avid skier.  Last week he had an unexpected treat.  An echidna, ambling across the slopes.

  
He and his friends formed a barricade and stayed there until the echidna had made it to the woods on the side of the ski run.  

And continuing the lucky day theme.

We are often visited by King Parrots.  They are wimps and very low on the pecking order.  If there are other birds about they don't get a look in at the feeders.  And this week they have made it clear that when it is crowded on the feeder, their needs should not be ignored.










While other birds are quite accustomed to us, none will eat from our hands.  Interesting that the only birds that will are so low on the pecking order and intimidated by other birds (including those which are smaller than they are).

We feel lucky, lucky, lucky.   And privileged.

161 comments:

  1. How absolutely wonderful! And now I am lucky and privileged. Wow! :-)

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    1. Djan: The blogosphere is a wonderful invitation into other people's lives isn't it? Loved your farmer's markets excursion this morning.

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  2. I remember that you told that parrots are in your yard. I think it's amazing and wonderful, because we have them only at the zoo in a big cage.
    I love the red parrots.
    Is there in the first picture hedgehog?

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    1. orvokki: The first picture is of an echidna - our equivalent of a hedgehog. This link will tell you a little more about them.
      We love our King Parrots too. The one with the red head is the male, and the soft green is the female.

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    2. Thanks for information. now I know. (Echidna is in finish "nokkasiili" and hedgehog is "siili".)

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    3. orvokki: Thank you. Nokkasiili sounds prettier than echidna.

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  3. Replies
    1. Sandi: And they are back this morning too.

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  4. Thank you for posting the Kings. [insert huge, grinning smiley face ]
    And thanks to brother and co for deflecting other skiers from the echidna.

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    1. dinahmow: There are huge grinning smiley faces here too. Yesterday an visiting occupational therapist was blown away by them.
      The brother has been skiing there for over forty years and never seen an echidna. He was determined to protect it.

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  5. You have to grab a meal when you can!!

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  6. wow amazing birds and I would like to meet them face to face. I love the red parrots

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    1. Gosia k: They are lovely birds, and we are so grateful they visit.

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  7. How wonderful to see the echidna. I never imagine them to be in the snow. We have one that wanders around this property. I've not seen it, unfortunately, but my landlords have. I spotted a little one on Newry Island when I was living on the island. They're wonderful creatures.

    The birds look very comfortable and content.

    I was hoping you were on the mend again, EC. I've not seen you for a couple of weeks on my blog so I was a little concerned you were still in the grips of the dreaded lurgy.

    Have a good week...and cuddles to your two furry mates. Take care. :)

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    1. Lee: It is a very long time since I have seen an echidna, and like you, I had never thought of them in the snow.
      The lurgy is finally leaving. About b time.

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  8. Now that's what I call a paid model. Thank you for sharing this.

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    1. Martin Kloess: And their pay is bird seed...

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  9. Amazing wild birds will feed from your hand.
    I had no idea the echidna could be found in a snowy area.

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    1. Alex J. Cavanaugh: It surprised my brother too. He knew they were there in summer, but had never seen one in the winter months.

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  10. Hey Sue,

    For one fleeting moment, I thought the echidna was a hedgehog.

    What royally colourful parrots.

    Enjoy the rest of your weekend, my delightful friend.

    Gary

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    1. klahanie: Dear Gary, I was thrilled to hear your good news. You must be feeling sooooo relieved. A wonderful weekend to you too.

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  11. Those parrots are absolutely gorgeous but I had never heard of an echidna before. It's like an anteater? Very interesting.

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    1. Kathleen Valentine: The echidna is sometimes known as a spiny anteater and is one of our 'stranger' animals, being an egg laying monotreme.

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  12. Oh how wonderful. I'd have thought I died and had gone to heaven. Echidna? I looked at the picture and thought crab on sand.

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    1. And I thought of turtles crossing a road.

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    2. donna baker: The smiles that feeding the king parrots give us threaten to stretch our faces. Always a joy. And I would welcome a crab on the sand or Joanne's turtle too.

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  13. Am I total ignoramus for not knowing that Australia has snow?

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    1. Birdie: We do get snow, but more of Oz doesn't get any than does. If that makes sense.

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  14. Used to see a lot of echidnas in my childhood. There doesn't seem to be as many around now. It's great to watch them bury themselves. The king parrots are very interesting. I did not realise they were so low on the pecking order, and how good is that they can be hand fed.

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    1. Andrew: I can remember as a child being 'stuck' by an echidna for some hours. We were travelling on a dirt track. My father saw one and stopped the car to avoid hitting it. It immediately dug in just behind the front wheel effectively trapping us until it decided to move again.
      Hand feeding the kings is an almost annual treat which never palls.

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  15. Lucky day theme indeed, how wonderful to have a parrot eating right out of your hand! Now that is truly a wonderful moment to carry in your thoughts! You certainly made their day too, by taking care of their needs, and I'm betting they will stick around!

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    1. Karen S.: When they are breeding they will go into the nearby hills, but for a lot of the year we get the Kings visiting regularly. And welcome them.

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  16. To hand feed a wild bird is quite amazing even our Pidge will not allow that.
    Merle ............

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    1. Merlesworld: Not all of the Kings will allow us to hand feed them, and none of the other birds, but yes, it is amazing.

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  17. Feeding the parrots like that is such a privilege and honour. Beautiful photos! How fortunate you are to be able to feed them as you do.

    The wild animals can expand our lives, can't they?

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    1. Marie Smith: DEFINITELY an honour and a privilege. I am so grateful to be allowed to get close to them.

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  18. I love it when humans go a little out of their way to make life safe for an animal. I don't think I ever heard of an echidna. This was a lucky one, to have your brother give it such nice consideration.
    The king parrot is so sweet. He's beautiful and apparently gentle enough not to peck your hand.
    Love the pictures! Thank you.

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    1. Myrna R.: My brother was excited to see the echidna and would have been devastated to see it bowled over by a skier.
      The king parrots are beautiful birds and have never, ever nipped us. They sometimes rake though the seed on our hands looking for 'better' seeds and their claws can scratch a little, but we are happy to pay that very small price.

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  19. Love the king parrots and the echidna. It is so strange that they are so big yet low on the totem pole. Here the birds that come the closest to us are the hummingbirds. We will have them for a few more weeks and then, off to Central America with them.

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    1. Sue in Italia/In the Land of Cancer: We are always a bit surprised at how low on the pecking order the kings are. The occasional one holds its ground, but mostly they just give way to the other birds.
      Hummingbirds are something I would love to see.

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  20. The kindness of strangers, it seems. I was thinking of all the birds at my feeders, and it seems they all gave tit for tat.

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    1. Joanne Noragon: There is a quite decided status line for the birds for visit us. An occasional exception but we can mostly predict quite accurately who will reign supreme.

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  21. Always learn something here, animals and flowers I did not know about! The parrot looks just like Christmas!!!!

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    1. Bookie: Aren't they beautiful things? By Christmas they will be in the hills raising their family, so we will relish their presence now.

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  22. Wonderful! And how lucky they are to have you, too. I've only seen an echidna in the zoo - your brother and his friends did well.

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    1. Slexia: Over the years we have been lucky enough to see a few echidnas in the wild, but it has been a while. A long while.

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  23. Oh my gosh, Sue, what a wondrous experience. To have a bird eat out of my hand is on my bucket list. And they are so pretty.

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    1. Sandra Cox: Each year there are one or two who will eat from our hands and it is a joy every year. We never, ever take it for granted.

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  24. I love seeing birds eating from hands. Any birds, anybody's hands. Beautiful shots :)
    I hope the echidna didn't feel too cold in the snow.

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    1. River: I hope the echidna didn't feel too cold as well - and that it had a nice warm burrow in the trees.
      Feeding the birds gives us immense pleasure. Each and every time. I fed a couple this morning and am still smiling.

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  25. Lovely pretty birds and a nice selection.

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  26. I can't even imagine getting to feed those beautiful parrots from my hand. SO lovely.

    Teresa

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    1. T.Powell Coltrin: The first time it happened we were amazed. And every time since we feel very, very privileged. And are.

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  27. good on your brother for helping the echidna get to the other side safely... We have king parrots that visit on occasion but the females are particularly shy so surprising to see that one of yours being hand fed. Nice :)

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    1. Anna: The female only got to eat when the male had eaten his fill. They are (mostly) much shyer.

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  28. Privileged, indeed! What gorgeous birds to be able to feed right out of your hand and have them trust you like that. A beautiful sight. Thank you for sharing it with us. :)

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    1. River Fairchild: It is a gift. This morning no fewer than three wanted to be hand fed. One succeeded because he wasn't prepared to share. The others got apple, but had to compete with other birds for the seed.

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  29. An echidna on a ski slope...how wonderful and so glad he was assisted to safely get to the other side.
    I think it wonderful that wild birds are eating from your hand and am wondering why they are so far down in the pecking order. They are so beautiful and thank you so much for sharing this with us.

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    1. Mimsie: I understand the the echidna was in no hurry and stopped to have a rest on someone's skis before continuing on.
      I have no idea why the King Parrots are so low in the pecking order. Much smaller birds bully them with impunity.

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  30. That parrot has such knowing eyes. And how lovely that both he and you are benefiting from this arrangement!

    The echidna is fascinating. National Geographic has a short clip that is very good, if anyone's interested. "Why did the echidna cross the ski slope?" We'll never know :)

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    1. jenny_o: I think we benefit most. The Kings will get food anyway, here or elsewhere. You are right about their knowing eyes too.
      And yes, the echidna is fascinating. Like so many of our native animals.

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  31. A couple of times I have seen an echidna by the side of the road and stopped to watch it, I never expected I would view them as cute but they really are.

    what a joy to feed the parrots!

    I see you have been ill, I hope your recovery is without hitches

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    1. kylie: It is a long time since I have seen an echidna but I agree, they are cute. Surprisingly so.
      I picked up a nasty virus which hung around, but in the scale of things it was a very minor illness, and is now nearly gone.

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  32. There is something so touching about a wild creature eating out of your hand. They look like they're smiling. I'll bet you were too.

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    1. only slightly confused: We were definitely smiling. Broadly.

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  33. Completely unfamiliar with echidnas. Looks to be a hedgehoggy sort of animal. . .?

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    1. Marty Damon: Echidnas are indeed a hedgehoggy/anteatery sort of animal. With some peculiarities of their own.

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  34. I didn't know echidnas lived in snowy places. It generally takes a lot of patience to get a wild bird to eat from ones hand. Very cool!

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    1. Jono: I suspect mostly they hunker down in warm places and wait winter out. Spring is here though, and perhaps the echidna knew it.
      To hand feed the birds I am prepared to expend a lot of patience.

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  35. I've never seen an echidna, looks like a cross between a hedgehog and one of our porcupines. How cool to see it on a ski run! And that King Parrot is pretty cool too, eating out of your hand like that. Perhaps it realized the only way it was going to eat would be to eat from your hand.
    Awesome pictures!

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    1. Carolyn McBride: Echidnas aren't a common sighting even here in their native land.
      Feeding the Kings is a joy. A daily joy at the moment.

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  36. The only time I have seen an echidna was in Tasmania. It was very cute waddling around amongst us in the wildlife museum we visited. The colours on your parrots are spectacular.

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    1. carol in cairns: We had a friend with a country property and used to see families of echidna quite often. Always a treat. The property has been sold and the friends are dead now.
      Aren't the Kings vivid? There are patches of hidden blue too.

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  37. I'd love to have parrots in my yard. They are beautiful birds.
    R

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    1. Rick Watson: They are indeed beautiful. Very welcome visitors.

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  38. How wonderful to have them eat from your hands! that too such handsome birds. Your photos always give me a mood lift. Thank you!

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    1. Nilanjana Bose: I rely on birds, the sky, the garden for mood lifts - and am very pleased to hear that it is shared.

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  39. Oh Wow, I would love to feed a parrot from my hand! How lucky. The first picture is of an animal that I have never heard of! So now going to goggle it!

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    1. Ginger Dawn Harman: Handfeeding the birds is wonderful. Happy googling. The echidna is a fascinating beastie.

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  40. Those beautiful parrots were lucky to have found you too.

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    1. Rawknrobyn: I am pretty certain that they are appreciated anywhere they choose to land.

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  41. I love your pictures and I love that you can hand-feed them!! WOW!!!
    Your pictures always have a calming effect on me. Maybe I should stay all day.

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    1. Sonya Ann: Of course you can stay. And WOW is what we say when we hand feed the birds. Quietly so as not to bother them.

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  42. How wonderful to have them eat of your hands! None of the birds in my backyard would do that. You are lucky indeed!

    I had no idea what an echidna is, so I looked it up. It seems to be a bit similar to our European hedgehog?

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    1. Carola Bartz: The echidna is a bit like a hedgehog, or an anteater, and entirely individual. Beautiful things.
      And we do love, and are very grateful, being able to hand feed the king parrots.

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  43. Wow...I never realized those parrots could be so friendly...you are fortunate. Would love to know more about the echidna, have never seen one before now. Thanks!

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    1. e: The parrots are still wild, and trusting enough to eat from our hands is an incredible gift.
      Echidnas are, like many of our animals, unique. There is a link to finding out more about them in my response to orvokki (second comment) or Captain Google will assist.

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  44. WellI wouldnever have thought that these large parrots would be down on the pecking order and I never thoguht they would come and feed from your hands so 2 surpises today for me. great priveledge for you

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    1. Margaret Adamson: Size isn't everything - even in the avian world. And yes, it is a huge privilege. Sometimes they even sit on our hands to feed.

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  45. You always have the best pictures of parrots. I'm jealous of where you live sometimes.

    That aside, I just realized that, while I know what an echidna is, I don't think I've ever seen a picture of one for some reason.

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    1. Robert Bennett: There are birds the world over who make me a little green.
      Echidnas are not widely depicted when advertising our wildlife - which I don't understand. They do feature on our five cent coin though.

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  46. Oh, EC! As you will see if you go back into my blog I accidentally deleted your response to my latest post!!! I'm so sorry. I'd already responded to your comment...and in the process of deleting my own response with the intention of correcting a typo...I accidentally deleted what you wrote!

    I could blame it on Shama who is insisting on sitting on my lap...but the fault is mine, and mine alone!!!

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    1. Lee: Not a problem. I have done exactly the same thing. I have put a comment back up.

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  47. Te envio mi blog de poesias por si quieres darle un vistazo
    Gracias.
    http://anna-historias.blogspot.com.es/2016/09/vacaciones.html?m=1

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    1. ANNA: Welcome. I will be over to check out your poetry in a little while.

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  48. How awesome you have parrots eating out of your hand! I'm jealous. Our birds are pretty skittish.

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    1. mshatch: Most of our birds are skittish too. This is a rare privilege. Which we cherish.

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  49. That echidna isn't in any big hurry is it:)
    Have a great day/evening.

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    1. Sandra Cox: I understand that half way across it stopped and took a break - sitting on someone's ski. Not in any hurry at all.
      Early morning here - and I hope your day is going well.

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    2. Ha!
      My day is going okay. YOU have a great one.

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  50. Hi EC - I didn't know what an echidna is - but now I know ... what a great little spiky animal. Love the parrots - well at least they're intelligent enough to know who will look after them! Cheers Hilary

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    1. Hilary Melton-Butcher: Echidnas have charm don't they? And I think the phrase bird-brained is frequently misused. They are a great deal smarter than they are given credit.

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  51. I'd never even heard of a echidna before today. Spiny ant eater! What a cute creature, too. I'm impressed that the skiers took time to protect it. Kindness and compassion exist.

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    1. cleemckenzie: I think that awe and wonder were the driving forces for my brother and his friends. They were thrilled to see the echidna. As I would have been.

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  52. Replies
    1. Carol Kilgore: As ours do - while simultaneously dancing.

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  53. Wow! An exotic Hedgehog and gorgeous birds. I find it difficult to understand pecking orders among birds and even other species. I was feeding a crow today and he had 2 competitors. While he was very happy to fight off a large Herring Gull with no problems - he didn't dare mess with a small Grey Squirrel - seemed very scared of it.

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    1. Angela: You were feeding a crow? Colour me jealous. Our crows (bearded ravens) are very wary. And beautiful. And I don't understand pecking order either. Size is part of it, but by no means all.

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    2. Not by hand I might add. I have been feeding one crow for almost four years and another for 2 or so years. Loads of photos on my Flickr - been meaning to do a blog post about them for quite a while.

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  54. Oh, my, gorgeous birds. And that shot of feeding from a palm is so adorable.

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  55. What an honour to feed a parrot by hand! Lovely shots.

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  56. I always love your bird photos! You have such beautiful and exotic looking feathered-friends! Is that your hand they're eating out of?? How wonderful..and as you said Lucky and Privileged!

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    1. BECKY: I think these are all photos I have taken - which means it is the smaller portion's hand. A little while ago they demanded more food though, and we have photos of them eating from both of our hands. Very, very lucky.

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  57. How very cool to have those beautiful birds eating out of your hand. Applauding your brother and his friends for taking care of the unexpected visitor to the slopes.

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    1. DeniseinVA: I was glad to hear (and unsurprised) that they kept the echidna safe.

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  58. The king parrot might be low on the pecking order, but he sure if beautiful - love his color scheme. And so neat that they eat out of your hand.

    Never heard of that other animal before!

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    1. Lynn: They are beautiful aren't they? The parrots and the echidna.

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  59. This is crazy but I never realized before
    what pecking order actually came from - never associated it with birds, before. Gosh I learn so much every day:) And that adorable little creature in your first photo - another first! Thanks for sharing the beauty of your world, Sue:)
    -Jennifer

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    1. Jennifer Richardson: I don't think we fully 'realised' where pecking order came from - until we started watching the birds. It is very, very real. And sometimes violent.

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  60. Love your shot of the echidna! Until today, I had never even heard of one of these, and this is the second shot of one I have seen today. Such a little cutie!

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    1. Jeanne: Welcome - isn't it amazing the way that happens. You come across something for the first time, and all of a sudden it is everywhere. Where did you find your other echidna photo?

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  61. I wasn't sure what an echidna was ....cousin of a hedgehog? So I googled it. They have the sweetest little faces!
    And as for those birds feeding from your hand--- what an honor!

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    1. Molly Bon: Captain Google brings us some marvels doesn't he? And yes, hand feeding the kings IS an honour.

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  62. ....not to mention what decent fellows your brother and his friends are!

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    1. Molly Bon: I don't think it occurred to them to do anything else. Which is as it should be.

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  63. The king parrots are just so spectacular.

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    1. CountryMum: Aren't they? Do you get them too?

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  64. Such beautiful birds and to have them eat out of your hand is awesome. I'd love just to be able to watch them.

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    1. Mason Canyon: I can't tell you how much time we spend each and every day marvelling at the birds.

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  65. What a wonderful treat. I love that. So cool. And the first photo was pretty darn cool, as well.

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    1. The Happy Whisk: At the moment feeding the birds is a daily treat. And a big one. I would have loved to have seen the echidna.

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  66. oh wow! eating from your hands is so neat. Your birds are so pretty!

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    1. Kim@stuffcould...: Some of our birds are very pretty. Hardly any of them are musical. Swings and roundabouts.

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  67. Oh what beautiful birds you get to enjoy. I had to look up echidna, which I thought might be the scientific name for a hedgehog, but its informal name is spiny anteater.

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    1. Snowbrush: The birds are lovely aren't they? While I recognise the echidna under the spiny anteater monicker, it is just an echidna here. And I would love to see them more often. It is years (decades?) since I have seen one.

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    2. Where do they find ants in the snow--don't they hibernate?

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    3. Snowbrush: The brother was surprised to see it out and about. Spring is almost here though, and the snow cover is patchy. I suspect that in the trees it didn't need to dig down far to find food and/or shelter. And they are very skilled diggers.

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    4. I am too, but you won't see me out with a shovel in the snow, especially if it gets cold enough for the ground to freeze. Or course, I rarely eat ants, so if I did eat ants, maybe I would be more motivated.

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    5. Snowbrush: Formic acid isn't my favourite tipple. Which might go someway to explaining why I am not a skilled digger.

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  68. How interesting that the King Parrots are wimps! I am super fond of echidnas and love that your brother and his friends made sure it stayed safe. I saw a mini 'echidna train' last week, just two of them, following each other around the bush including a metre in front of my feet - just what I needed.

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    1. Kim: I don't know why the Kings are wimps, but wimps they are. The crimsons see them off, the cockies see them off, they cower away from wattle birds...
      Years back we saw four echidnas (a family we believe) and the memory is something I treaure.

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  69. Your brother sounds like he is a relative of yours with his behavior on the ski slope towards the echidna. It is strange a bird with "king" in its name is so low in the order of things. Love that they eat from your hand!

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    1. Strayer: We were brought up to have respect (and love) for animals. And all of us do.

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  70. An echidna! That would make my day! What beautiful parrots! I guess the price of such beauty is having to wait in line for the ugly birds to eat their fill.

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    1. Wally Jones: Some beautiful (more beautiful?) birds are also higher than the kings in the pecking order. I too would love to see an echidna again.

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  71. Your brother certainly had an interesting sighting! So glad you shared the picture with us. I love the bird pictures- but I am a bit obsessed with birds. I would love for one of the birds in my yard to eat out of my hand. :)
    ~Jess

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    1. DMS ~ Jess: I too am bird obsessed. We spend a lot of time each and every day marvelling at them.

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    2. " We spend a lot of time each and every day marvelling at them."

      You have such beautiful birds to marvel at. The prettiest we have are ducks, herons, and kingfishers that live in the creek across from our house, but we can’t see them from our house, which is a bit of a drag, especially in winter. I’ve never been around such beauty as you post photos of, and I envy you greatly. One of the “proofs” for God is the idea that the earth contains superfluous beauty, and while this makes no intellectual sense, it does have emotional appeal when in the presence of beauty that all but leaves on prostrate.

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    3. Snowbrush: I marvel at the little brown jobs too. They have a subtle beauty of their own, and watching then and their behaviours is endlessly fascinating. Though you have to remember (as I do) that my family talked about small things for small minds. I am becoming increasingly fascinated with the beauty of the insect world too (google peacock spiders for an example.)

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    4. “Though you have to remember (as I do) that my family talked about small things for small minds.”

      That is surely among the stupidest statements that I’ve ever read. Anyone can be impressed by the large, the colorful, and the loud, but to be impressed by that which others don’t notice suggests sensitivity, alertness, and attention to detail. If your family had been right, the world be full of scientists who studied elephants while no one of any great intelligence would study viruses, insects, and earthworms, and just imagine how impoverished our species would be without the knowledge of such things. Surely, the people in your family who told you this were either pulling your leg or they were far denser than your own intelligence would suggest.

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    5. Snowbrush: Thank you. They weren't pulling my leg. My family didn't value my form of intelligence and I was in my thirties before I realised that I am neither stupid nor weak.

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    6. “I was in my thirties before I realised that I am neither stupid nor weak.”

      I had a similar problem. My parents seemed easily resigned to me having poor grades, and I took this to mean that they had no confidence in my intelligence, hence I was stupid. As for my teachers, they were the same way, so I came to assume that if a person had to work to learn to something that it meant he was inept and might as give up at the outset to spare himself a lot of humiliation. Every year, I hoped it would be different, so I would prepare for school by cleaning my room, getting my desk straight, putting the covers on my books just so, and all the other things that I hoped would enable me to learn, but the moment I had the least difficulty, I would give up for the entire year. I remember going to the school guidance counselor once, and he so much as told me that my IQ score wasn’t that good. Had I been less sensitive and more tenacious, I might have prevailed, but as it was, I flunked three grades and never finished high school. (I did manage to get into to college and finish it—which I only did in order to avoid Vietnam—and I had the good fortune to learn in college that I wasn’t so dumb after all). In any event, if anyone can read my blog and think that here is a fellow who lacks intelligence, I would consider it their problem rather than mine, because I know damn well that I’ve above average in intelligence. I just wish I had discovered it sooner, and that someone had instilled good study habits in me. I see my life as failure in many ways, but not because of a lack of intelligence, but rather a lack of good early influences. I often wonder how my parents could have given up on me so profoundly when I was but a child—and like you, a gifted child in some respects.

      I really could not be more appalled by your parents’ idiocy because they were not only callous, their logic was at the bottom of the deep end of the cesspool. If you go by it, you should at least limit your bird interests to ostriches because, by god, they’re big, but you would really be better off studying whales or supernovas. One can but try to forgive one’s parents for being so deeply flawed. Just as they caused some of our flaws, no doubt their own parents caused theirs.

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    7. Snowbrush: Thank you. You are right about their experiences shaping their behaviour. As mine no doubt have done.

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