Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Wednesday, 28 September 2016

Words for Wednesday

The lovely Delores at Under the Porch Light had been running this meme for a considerable period of time, week after week.   Computer issues led her to bow out for a while and I took over.  When Delores' absence looked like being more permanent I begged and cajoled for other volunteers to share providing the prompts, and Words for Wednesday became a movable feast.  Delores discontinued her blog for a while, but she has returned.  Her new blog can be found here.

Essentially the aim is to encourage us to write.  Each week we are given a choice of prompts: which can be words, phrases, music or an image.   What we do with those prompts is up to us:  a short story, prose, a song, a poem, or treating them with ignore...  We can use some or all of the prompts.

Some of us put our creation in comments on the post, and others post on their own blog.  I would really like it if as many people as possible joined into this fun meme.  If you are posting on your own blog - let me know so that I, and other participants, can come along and applaud.

This month the prompts have been published here, but are provided by Margaret Adamson and her friend Sue Fulcher.



This weeks prompts are:


  1. Backpack 
  2. Hundred  
  3. Relatives 
  4. Happy 
  5. Tick 
  6. Plant



And/Or


  1. Illumination
  2. Age
  3. Pastime
  4. Profound
  5. Die
  6. Laugh


 


Next month the prompts were to be provided by Jacqueline aka The Cranky on her blog.  Sadly Jacqueline has had a stroke, and is unable to participate. I hope all of you will join me in wishing Jacqueline a complete recovery.  It seems so unfair that she was hit with this, just when she was turning her life around

I will publish next month's prompts here. 

85 comments:

  1. EC backpack and holiday ,, wow great idea

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    1. Gosia k: I have grown too comfort loving to think that a backpack and a holiday go together.

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  2. Wishing Jacqueline a speedy recovery!

    Regarding the prompts: I thought of lyme disease when reading 'tick'. Guess that's where my mind is at!

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    1. Bea: Are you going to join us and write about lyme disease?

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    2. That's a good challenge & a difficult one. I might do...

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  3. i hope Jacqueline has a full recovery.

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    1. Marie Smith: So do I. It will be a long and slow road, but I am fervently hoping it is complete.

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  4. Before I go to feed the landlords' cat and chickens (they, the landlords, not the animals, have gone to the UK...so I'm in charge of the farmyard animals)...I thought I'd tackle this weeks words...

    "Well, that was one thing she was HAPPY to TICK off her list of things to do. She had a far better PASTIME to occupy her mind and plans now that she’d signed a contract on the property than cater for her many, raucous RELATIVES. A HUNDRED of them had turned up to what was supposed to be only a small family re-union. A HUNDRED – all milling around in their select groups!

    If she’d had found an escape route, there and then she would have grabbed her BACKPACK and headed for the hills never to be seen again. But she couldn’t do that; she was the host.

    Then everything changed – for the better - when she saw her favourite cousin, Kate, standing alone at the rear of the garden near the gardenia shrub.

    Kate had been her constant companion and confidante when they both were children; her once dearest friend who she’d not seen for years. And there she was, standing beside the flowering gardenia; her gardenia; the PLANT she’d given Melly as a parting gift on the day she left the area. On the day she’d vowed never to return.

    PROFOUND changes had occurred to Melly’s life and surroundings since their sad parting.

    Forgetting her AGE, like a six-year old, Melly skipped across the yard (and the years) to her cousin, singing out her name.

    With a joyful LAUGH, she wrapped her arms around her long-lost cousin. Her eyes sparkled brighter than a multitude of lights used for ILLUMINATION on a city square’s Christmas tree.

    “Oh, my God! You’re here! I think I’ll DIE from happiness!” Melly gushed."

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    1. Lee: Positive and lovely. I hope their cat (Molly?) stays safe while your landlords are away this time.

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    2. Me, too, EC...but since that time early last year when she was bitten by a snake I've firmly laid down my condition - that while they're away Molly remains housebound!! It's a big house so she has many rooms to explore and many beds, sofas and chairs to sleep upon; facts I repeated to her again this morning!!

      I won't go through again what I went through early last year. I was a wreck during and after that episode!

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    3. Lee: I remember. I would have been too.

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    4. I like your story Lee, and angel will also be housebound while i am away for the weekend. He won't be happy, but he'll be safe.

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  5. The illumination of his age
    andd pastime so profound
    that when the man had to die
    the people heard him laugh

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    1. Martin Kloess: Going out laughing is a lovely thought.

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    2. going out laughing, that would make people wonder why..

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  6. Live in the Moment...
    Smell the roses...
    Take the time to dance...

    Jodi was a very happy backpack philosopher. She had, and spouted, well over a hundred profound sayings which she believed could offer illumination to her relatives. Could offer illumination and WOULD give it, if only they would listen. She knew that it was one of their favourite pastimes to laugh at her, but refused to give up. She didn't know what made them tick, but knew her way was better. She would just die if she had to live their way. Shrivel up and die.
    Perhaps, just perhaps, one of her sayings would plant a seed in their brains. Their age was against them, but never is such a negative word...

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    1. Good luck, Jodi:)
      I have a relative that spouts;)
      Love it. Great job, EC:)

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    2. Sandra Cox: Jodi can be an irritating know-it-all.

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    3. Oh, Jodi sounds like a card. Enjoyed it, E.C.

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    4. A lovely little snippet, fresh and inspiring. What a great philosopher Jodi is.

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    5. i think being constantly spouted at would be annoying, but if they need a little light in their lives then maybe the spouting isn't such a bad thing. She does roam around and spread the word in various locations over time, not all at once.

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  7. If I had a hundred relatives I'd be happy to plant my feet on the long road and tick away the miles between me and them!

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    1. Cloudia: Lovely to see you join in. Somedays I am not certain whether my feet would be going towards or away from my relatives.

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    2. I'm rather glad I don't have a hundred relatives, but there are some families I know who are prolific and probably do, but they seem to all be happy about it, if family gatherings are anything to go by.

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  8. During the pastime in my life, I stumbled upon illumination at my age which I'll never let die, for its quite profound and makes me laugh from time to time.

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    1. Lon Anderson: Laughter is such a gift. Thank you for joining us this week.

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  9. I'd forgotten next month was Jacqui's turn :(
    I'll work on the words and hope to schedule my story for Friday, but we're expecting a violent storm to hit later today carrying on into tomorrow, with possible blackouts (no computer)and floodings etc. Much worse than the last storm we're told.

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    1. River: I heard about your storm. I hope that it isn't as bad as they are predicting. Stay safe.

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  10. I have to get busy now and pre-cook some foods to be eaten cold, in case the power goes out. Sausages, steak,hard boil some eggs, that way at least I can eat sandwiches by lamplight

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  11. I love how encouraging you are to people! Offering to applaud their creations is kind.

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    1. John Wiswell: It doesn't feel like an act of kindness - but of justice.

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  12. The first set makes me think of a massive family reunion out camping where people getting attacked by ticks.

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    1. Robert Bennett: I would welcome ticks more than some of my extended family. And the attacks would be less painful too.

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  13. This is my friend Sue's forst story Enjoy.

    I suppose it's all RELATIVE but what started out as a jaunt, a HAPPY idea hatched after a few too many drinks, actually now felt like a bit of a nightmare .
    The bet was one HUNDRED miles in a week, no staying in hotels....Eazy Peazy!
    So I packed my BACKPACK and started out.
    The first day was fine, striding out, whistling, smiling.
    After a night under a tree on a milmat I wasn't quite as joyful the next day, but nil desperandum, upwards and onwards. At this point I was still looking in awe at the animals and PLANT life.
    After a second night I quite honestly didn't give a toss about the flora and fauna.
    I awoke to rain on the fourth day, definitely regretting that last round now!
    I stowed my soaking sleeping bag into my soaking wet backpack and went behind a tree to do what a guy has to do and went on my not so merry way.
    Later that day after some vigorous scratching my nether regions, I popped into a handy public convenience t see what the problem was.
    After much twisting, turning and leaping up and down, the mirrors all being at head height, I discovered the biggest fattest TICK hanging onto my left buttock for dear life.
    Now I am not good at creepy crawlers and this one, I swear, was 6 inches long and determined to drain me of every drop of blood I had.
    I didn't even bother to pull up my jeans and yfronts I ran out to the nearest passerby, who happened to be a grey haired, gentile, older lady. I fell on yelling "get it off, get it off now!"
    She naturally on being accosted by a semi naked, yelling whirling dervish, fainted on the spot.
    I am writing this from the local police station cell.
    Needless to say I didn't win the bet, although technically I'm not staying in a hotel........

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    1. Margaret Adamson - and Sue: Love this. Sue's sense of humour so often gives us a wonderful story.

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  14. This is my first story.

    I was so excited when my RELATIVES from Australia invited me to stay with them for three weeks however what made me more HAPPY was they were great birders and we were going to look for the elusive male Lyrebird in the breeding season.

    The many HUNDRED miles I would have to travel from Northern Ireland to Sydney would be well worth it just to see this bird and after packing my BACKPACK, collecting my flight tickets, and insurance documents I was off.

    After a few days having recovered from my jet lag, we headed into the forest. to tract down the Lyrebird. After 4 hour, we heard him calling but this can be very deceptive as they can through their voices. We had to be very quiet and at one point I tripped over a tree root but saved myself with my hands before I did a face-PLANT on the forest floor! Having caught my breath, I looked up and there not ten feet in front of me was a Lyrebird with his tail feathers fanned out doing his breeding dance. WOW! I was mesmerised and was nearly afraid to breath in case he stopped displaying. Finally I was able to put a TICK beside the Lyrebird’s name in my record book..

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    1. Margaret Adamson: You are ahead of me. I have heard, but never seen a Lyrebird in the wild. Great use of the words too.

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  15. This is Sue's 2nd story

    In an AGE before the printing press changed the world, manuscripts were copied with great patience by monks and scribes. Their dedication was PROFOUND and considered a holy duty. They wrote mainly in Latin, many not being able to understand what they were writing and blindly copying. The manuscripts were accessible only to the aristocracy and clergy.
    They illustrated their work with brilliant and intricate ILLUMINATION, wonderful and colourful pictures.
    This was no PASTIME but a dedication that lasted a lifetime and many scribes would DIE before they completed their work, another scribe would carry on.
    The whole process was conducted in silence, no speaking and a LAUGH was a punishable offence and considered a sacrilege.
    We are still able to wonder at these amazing historic documents, the colours still as vibrant as the day they were painted and a testament to the dedicated men who worked tirelessly and couldn't read the words they wrote.

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    1. Margaret Adamson and Sue: Another great story. And powerful truth.

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  16. This is my second story.

    They were bound by fate, and she knew he felt the PROFOUND connection between them from the moment they met. Both independently has signed up to so a course in Astrology but never imagined that this shared PASTIME would bring them together. The ILLUMINATION of the moonlight on his face partially obscured his features however she could see his chiselled jaw and cheekbones, blue eyes and very blonde hair and knew he was younger than her. Would this AGE difference matter to him? It certainly didn’t to her. Her heart was beating so fast she was sure it would jump out of her body. He had a wicked sense of humour which she loved and was soon able to give and much as she got. His LAUGH was very infectious. As they were parting, she fully expected him to ask for her phone number or a date for coffee, instead he said, he enjoyed her company and would be telling his wife what a wonderful evening he had spent star gazing and meeting others in the group. My world fell apart, I am sure my face said it all. I wanted to DIE, there and then.

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    1. Margaret Adamson: Ouch. Your poor narrator.

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  17. Wishing Jacqueline a speedy recovery.

    That was it. She'd had enough. Taking her backpack, she began filling it with her favorite things. She was not about to face a hundred relatives with their happy faces and cherry smiles just to see them faint (or die) in shock and horror. She'd leave first. That way they would never know. Besides how could she possible tell them. No, she couldn't not when she was supposed to take over as head of the family soon. She'd walk away and they'd never find out this little tick they adored had rather live on a plant rather than one of those scary, smelly animal creatures.

    Thoughts in Progress
    and MC Book Tours

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    1. Mason Canyon: Love it. Living up to expectations can be so very hard.

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  18. I have to go to the dentist today so no telling what will happen with my WFW:-)

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    1. Granny Annie: Good luck. I do think of dentists as a necessary (and scary and expensive) evil.

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  19. Tired, dirty, hungry and sweaty Janet was stopped dead in her tracks by a moment of blinding illumination. It was a profound truth the universe brought to her attention. At her age the last thing she should be doing was hiking through pristine, virgin countryside with a hundred relatives she barely knew while lugging a thirty pound backpack. . She had blisters on her hands from an unknown plant she apparently was allergic to and most definitely a tick bite on her ankle. She considered the universal message of doom and gloom. The air was fresh and clean, the sun was shining and she could smell hamburgers grilling somewhere close by. A cousin she never knew she had smiled at her and handed her a water bottle. Janet let loose a laugh of pure joy. If she was going to die of over exertion on this trip she would die happy. The universe wasn’t always right.

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    1. only slightly confused: Love it. And while the universe might be right, our interpretation is often an epic fail.

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  20. I used to love these writing prompts, back before deadlines and crazing writing demands. I wonder if I could tie all those up in six lines of poetry? Now there's a fun challenge.

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    1. Crystal Collier: I dare you. I double dare you. I would love to see that.

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  21. I'm impressed by all the entries. Yours is touching, EC. Very nice. One of these days, I'll contribute something again.

    Be well, my friend.

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    1. Rawknrobyn: I look forward to those days.

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  22. Get well soon Jacqueline!
    I love reading the comments! Thank you for doing this, EC.

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    1. Sonya Ann: I am always amazed at the creativity. And thank you for your wishes for Jacqueline.

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  23. Hi EC ...

    "Bag packed, relatives hugged, small backpack prepared for the journey … will they find ticks, will there be hundreds of them … and what plants will they be hiding under – let the safari begin."

    Oh dear - I just read about Jacqueline ... my thoughts too for a slow, steady and good recovery for her ...

    Cheers to you both - Hilary

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    1. Hilary Melton-Butcher: Safari always sound so exciting. And then I stop and think. Ticks freak me out. I was never a good camper, and these days suspect I would be even worse.

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  24. Wishing Jacqueline (my mother's name, too) a quick recovery.

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  25. Back in my youth I did a lot of backpacking. Now I am old and too illuminated to try it. :)

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    1. Kathleen Valentine: I suspect that is true of many of us.

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  26. Here is my story. Words: Illumination, Age, Pastime, Profound, Die, Laugh
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Marianne leafed slowly through the old manuscript. She had always had this ability to bring pictures to life. It had been her favorite PASTIME when she was a girl and trained to be a sorceress: bringing to life cats and squirrels from the pictures in her beloved books. Once, she had animated a fox, and the servants hunted it all over the house. Today, she would use her gift to lift the siege of her castle. Right now, her soldiers were fighting on the walls, repelling the brutal attacks of the rebel barons. She needed to find something in this manuscript—a monster or a hero—to vanquish the enemy army.
    The pages, yellow with AGE, crackled faintly. Would this three-headed hydra serve? No. Perhaps the dragon with crimson scales? No. The PROFOUND truth was: each creature, once alive and out of its former ILLUMINATION, developed a mind of its own. None would heed her words or answer her pleas. The hydra might as well rampage in her castle’s depleted pantry as turn its hunger on the rebels. The dragon might simply fly away; the darn lizards had a reputation for cowardice.
    She turned another page and suddenly wanted to LAUGH. She found her savior. Of course, she would have to release the monster outside the walls—she couldn’t risk getting it loose inside—but once it was out there, she would have time to slip back inside. Her attackers wouldn’t pay her any attention; they would be terrified. They wouldn’t have a choice but to run or DIE. They didn’t know that her animations only lasted for twenty-four hours before reverting back to pictures. Smiling, she picked up the heavy tome and headed to the gates.

    The picture she found could be seen here:
    http://66.media.tumblr.com/4e32c7d0c5697ecb21e5db89fcb5eb39/tumblr_mqclc0FptC1r38ji3o1_540.jpg
    (image by James Gurney)

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    1. Olga Godim: I love this - and that image would scare me too. Witless.

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  27. Having read all of these stories it is hard to choose a winner
    I have had a busy week doing other catch up things and have finally found time to write and have posted my short yarn on my post, feel free to visit. I must return to catch up mode and reply to my other visitors, again all nice stories, thanks.

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    1. Vest: Thank you. I will be over to visit shortly.

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  28. Instead of inviting hundreds of formally attired friends and relatives to attend our wedding, we opted for something a little less traditional and a little more us. Those few who chose to share our happy day had a much different experience than a normal wedding day. We began at 5:15 on October 14. Hiking boots and cargo pants were the preferred dress of the day. My handsome husband and his groomsmen each carried a backpack with all the reception necessities, while my attendants offered a steady hand and flashlight beams to our parents who were unused to our regular activities and had a hard time seeing and navigating the rocky path in the semi darkness. One by one we made our way up the trail until we reached the clearing at the summit. As the he minister began the ceremony under the dusky purple sky, we repeated our vows to each other and right as the day began, so did our new life.
    And the reception? Well, nothing beats coffee, bacon and eggs cooked outdoors.
    And our friends and families reactions? Our friends are pretty much the same friends we have regular adventures with, so they loved it. My Mother in Law ( prim and proper lady that she is decided to wear a skirt and sandals )and her bare legs and feet had an unfortunate incident with a poison ivy plant. (Of course we didn't find out about that until a week later, and even later before we found she is violently allergic to it, but she only had a short hopsital stay.) Mom was game for the whole event and dressed accordingly but has a one hour bladder and balance issues. She found a stand of bushes not far from the clearing and had Dad arrange a couple of logs to Mcgyver a make shift pottie. And that is how she wound up with a tick on her ass. (which also took a few days to reveal itself).
    Time has eased some of their negative memories and now they both look back at the day with warm thoughts, kind of. Do you think we should tell them in advance that their granddaughter is about to be born outdoors with a water birth? Probably not,

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    1. Anne in the kitchen: Huge smiles. And yes, tell them about their granddaughter. They are both brave. And there shouldn't be ticks or poison ivy at that event. One hopes.

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    2. OMGosh, this was great. So realistic.

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  29. wishing Jacqueline great health .that sounds wonderful idea for the creative minds

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    1. baili: Thank you. I hope you will join us.

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  30. I've got my story worked out and scheduled it for Friday 30th. I won't be home to read comments (babysitting) but I hope you will all come over and read it.
    http://river-driftingthroughlife.blogspot.com.au

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    1. River: I hope you have power back again after last nights further outage. I will read your story with pleasure.

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  31. Great prompts! Thanks for visiting:)

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    1. DeniseinVA: Margaret and Sue did their usual excellent job with the prompts.

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  32. This is great. I have a new story to read everyday:)
    Hope you're having a good one.

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    1. Sandra Cox: And every day for the next month.

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  33. How I wish I had the impetus to finish my book's sequel. "Someday" has already passed though, and I just can't get back in the writing saddle. So sad.

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    1. lotta joy: You have had a lot to deal with for a very long time. I hope that some day is lurking just round the corner.

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  34. Sounds wonderful. And I wish her speedy recovery.

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  35. MOROSE by Granny Annie

    70 my new AGE
    Seeking ILLUMINATION
    Not a good PASTIME.
    Burial or cremation?

    Should I LAUGH?
    Not feeling spry
    PROFOUND thought
    When will I DIE?

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    1. Granny Annie: This is excellent. And a place a lot of us have been.

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  36. Little bit late here. It is migraine marathon time. But, I have some ideas and will post them at me site. Your words are always great.

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    1. Susan Kane: I am so sorry. Migraines are a truly awful thing. A marathon of them is worse.

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