Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Sunday, 15 October 2017

Sunday Selections #349

Sunday Selections was originally brought to us by Kim, of Frogpondsrock, as an ongoing meme where participants could post previously unused photos languishing in their files.
 
The meme is now continued by River at Drifting through life.  The rules are so simple as to be almost non-existent.  Post some photos under the title Sunday Selections and link back to River.  Clicking on any of the photos will make them embiggen.

Like River I usually run with a theme
This weeks images are from home.


Most of you know I love the cat, the visiting birds and the garden.  Sadly my loves don't always play nicely together.

I was watching the spring bulbs emerge from the ground.  One area was filled with daffodils (doubles), tulips and iris.  And each morning when I went outside I was greeted with uprooted plants, shredded leaves and beheaded flowers.  And I am talking dozens and dozens of plants.  Hiss and spit.  So I watched.  And found the culprit.  Sulphur-crested cockatoos (and the air around me was sulphurous too).













Not one tulip in that area bloomed.  And the few daffodils which were allowed to bloom were beheaded and shredded. As were the grape hyacinths and the tritellia and, and, and... It wasn't about food, it was all about destruction. 

Trees weren't safe either.





So I resorted to violence.  A pump-action water pistol.  Which now lives permanently on the front veranda.  And remains loaded.

The mad woman with a camera became a mad woman with a gun and took to going out at first light and gunning errant birds.  With relish.  It seems to be working. 


Luckily they (mostly) limited their depreciations to one area.  Other parts of the garden have been allowed to bloom.





 And yes, the vandals are still welcome. 

126 comments:

  1. oh no, perhaps you can leave them a bit of lettuce or some such to prevent them from their devious ways.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Linda Starr: There is apple and seed out for the birds. Cockatoos are known to enjoy destruction.

      Delete
  2. Nice plants, but, I don't like guns, and the killing Cockatoo, no no no....................

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    Replies
    1. Bob Bushell: It is a water pistol. The only sort of gun I could hold and fire. And the cockies were damp, but unharmed.

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  3. Replies
    1. Cloudia: The world is a magical place. And beautiful.

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  4. They really did a number on everything it seems, the pump action water pistol looks like both a fun and effective solution.

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    Replies
    1. Jimmy: The water pistol requires me to keep a close watch - it isn't foolproof. But yes, it is surprisingly enjoyable and effective.

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  5. OMG, we've exported Trump's hair. Send squirt guns.

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    Replies
    1. Joanne Noragon: If only Trump was as easily discouraged as the cockatoos. And they are much better looking (and behaved).

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    2. :-)
      You know what. We shall persevere.

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  6. Hi EC - that's some water cannon for birds ... well honestly some birds are just vindictive - one wonders why. Glad they're keeping away - but just shows what birds can do to upset us ... glad it wasn't the whole garden - cheers Hilary

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    Replies
    1. Hilary Melton-Butcher: I think they were bored. Or perhaps someone higher up the pecking order was on the feeders. I am very, very grateful that it wasn't the whole garden, while mourning the pieces we lost.

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  7. That must be very disheartening to wake to such damage. At times I see a huge mess under a plane tree and straight away I know what has done the damage. Your iris and tulips look really nice.

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    1. Andrew: It is disheartening. Infuriating. Maddening. I am glad that they limited (mostly) their depreciations to one bed. But how it suffered.

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  8. Jerks of the bird world! It’s seems they are being destructive for meanness sake.

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    Replies
    1. Birdie: They are notorious vandals. And damage houses and shade-sails too. While I am very unhappy about the damage to the garden it could have been a lot worse.

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    2. All parrots have a need to shred things, it's unfortunate for us!

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  9. Hey EC...I knew you were referring to the sulphur boys even before you got to that point! lol Vandals with no discrimination on the loose!!!

    No gun control in control at your place!!!

    Have yourself a cracking good week...cuddles to Jazz. I bet he hightails it when he sees that gun come into view (and action)!! :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lee: Jazz is not a fan of squirters. I have a smaller one inside for his transgressions.
      Are you still looking after Molly? Or is it just your two beautiful furs?

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    2. Yesterday was my final day of Molly care, EC.

      Her "parents" arrived back around midday yesterday, but I went up earlier in the morning to bid farewell to my wards, and to complete my catering chores...until next time...

      And, between you, me and Ms Molly, she is looking a lot better now than she did when my tenure commenced! ;)

      Delete
    3. Lee: It does sound as if Ms Molly would be better off in your tender care on a permanent basis.

      Delete
  10. Well....the rest of the garden looks pretty good !

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    Replies
    1. Our photos: Thank you. That corner is still looking very sad.

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  11. This is hilarious!! And so Australian! Your semi-automatics are water guns! ;-) A brilliant way to keep away the destructive little feathered shits (even if they are pretty). You are a natural storyteller -- I love the progression, complete with photo of one of the culprits, who seems to be eyeing you with glee.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ellen/Chipmunk: How lovely to see you. Destructive feathered shits they are. And the bird was certainly eyeing me off with glee.

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  12. Will wonders never cease? Deer do that to our gardens, but can't imagine parrots. I've had rabbits and turtles nibble on veggies in the garden too.

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    Replies
    1. donna baker: If they ate things I wouldn't be so incensed. This was destruction for destructions sake.

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  13. I'm a sucker for cockatoos. Great post.

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    Replies
    1. Bill: We love them too. And happily feed them. And resent them rewarding us with destruction.

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  14. How discouraging, even heartbreaking, to spend so much time on the garden (and to be feeding the little blighters, too!!) and have them be such trouble-makers. Your solution seems top-notch--effective but not fatal. I'm glad you still have some of your splendour to share.

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    Replies
    1. jenny_o: There has been grief. There has been anger. My pacifist self is appalled at how much I enjoy firing the water pistol at them. It works though. And they fly away healthy.

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  15. Love the image of you as the mad woman with the (water) gun!
    The flowers they didn't maul still look wonderful. And I'm pleased that you still welcome the feathered white villains into your garden.

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    Replies
    1. Alexia: I am hoping that I will be able to recover that garden bed for next year. And that some of the vandalised blooms will be able to flower. In years gone by that particular bed has been a picture. Fifty or sixty red tulips make a dramatic statement.

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  16. Such destructive birds they are!

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    Replies
    1. CountryMum: Yes. I hope their damage on the farm can be kept to a minimum.

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  17. Replies
    1. Jamie Ghione: They are. I am enjoying the ones we have, and mourning those that were destroyed.

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  18. Who knew cockatoos could be so destructive! And why??

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    Replies
    1. Sandi: They are noted for being vandals. Houses are not safe from them. They chew on wood, and strip metal. Beautiful, but destructive.

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  19. I wonder why they are so destructive for just no reason but spite? Now that is one big gun!! Good for you, EC. :-)

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    Replies
    1. DJan: Boredom? Because they can? It is a very big gun, and has an excellent range. Tee hee.

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  20. I understand their motives. They are beautiful (perhaps slightly narcissistic) critters and don't want anything else to rival their beauty.

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    Replies
    1. Anne in the kitchen: A beautiful king parrot who regularly has her tail feathers yanked by one of the cockies would agree with you.

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  21. That's pretty naughty! I used to have a parrot who liked to work on our wood paneling. Really is a shame to lose those lovely spring blossoms.

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    Replies
    1. Sharon Quails: Growing up my mother kept a cockatoo who ate his way through the wooden stand to his aviary. They are determined and strong. Her cockatoo was never caged again (a win) and spent his life very happily. It was a shame to lose the blossoms. I am glad that some were saved.

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  22. Mad woman with a water gun. Loved the image and good for you. Someone has to stay in charge. Good Sunday selections. I read this on a Sat eve in TX. Cheers

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    Replies
    1. Joanne: Welcome and thank you. There is quite a lot of mad woman (mad women?) in me. And some of them enjoy themselves. It is Sunday afternoon here now.

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  23. Hiss and spit, indeed! I had to laugh at the bird in the photo. He looks proud of his wrongdoing as he poses for you. I'm glad the squirt gun seems to be working. Your flowers are too beautiful to fall victim to wanton destruction.

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    Replies
    1. River Fairchild: There has most definitely been hissing and spitting. And spraying and swearing.

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  24. The little shits! They're like two-year-olds. They get bored and then wreck stuff. So sorry they took it out on your garden (especially the daffodils -- those really hurt!).
    -Marty K

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Marty K: Bored two year olds is about right. But stronger and smarter.

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  25. I'm pleased they are still welcome! you are big hearted even for a gun toting maniac :)

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    Replies
    1. kylie: I don't think it was personal - even if it felt that way. They rapidly learned about the gun too. Very rapidly.

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  26. How can something so beautiful be so naughty too? Bad Birds! The super soaker should help, they'll learn to stay away from your blooms, although it may take a couple of seasons. At least the rest of your garden is okay. Sad to lose all the tulips and daffodils though.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. River: The bed they destroyed is on the street, and is the first one you see approaching the house. They really worked a number on it, but (mostly) left the other beds. Fingers crossed they don't just shift their games.

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  27. My theory is that these are the teenagers of the Sulphur Crested Cockatoo family.. or last years hatch that didn't find a mate and so the boredom... Here the young ones play chasey through the tree tops of an afternoon while 'yelling' at each other, perhaps daring each other on to greater aerial exploits... sorry about your flowers..

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anna: I suspect you are right. There is often jockeying for position here and 'beak-offs'. The phrase pecking order is no empty platitude.

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  28. Love your gun! Those bird bandits deserve what they got.

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    Replies
    1. Olga Godim: They did. And recognise the super soaker as soon as I pick it up now - which is a positive thing.

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  29. Dear EC
    How frustrating! I think they deserve the water gun. At least your other plants have been left alone and are looking beautiful.
    Best wishes
    Ellie

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ellie Foster: It is frustrating, and sad. I hope we are over the worst of it. And that they forget before spring returns.

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  30. Pretty as a picture.
    Oh gosh, those cockatoos do ruin things but that one sitting up doesn't care.

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    Replies
    1. Margaret-whiteangel: They don't care a jot.

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  31. SC cockies are such characters, I find it hard to be cross with them for long. But resorting to a water cannon is understandable. A few years ago I befriended one and fed it for a few days. Then I noticed it had starting eating the wooden window frames. So I regretfully gave it notice, I was no longer a friend or a feeder.

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    Replies
    1. catmint: We have a few we can hand feed, and feeders and apples for rather a lot of birds. The garden destruction seemed more than a little unfair. Despite the damage they are birds of immense charm.

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  32. I can't let my tomatoes turn red outside because they attract the birds who will open the tomato just to pick the seeds. Hopefully the cockatoos will now leave your flowers alone

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    Replies
    1. Sue in Italia/In the Land of Cancer: If previous years are anything to go by, they will leave the garden pretty much alone - until next Spring. When I will be ready. I would still be annoyed if they were eating the garden but less than I am at destruction for destruction's sake.

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  33. And that guy didn't even look repentant! So glad you thought of the water gun - I love the mental image of you getting after him with that.

    Still - some lovely color there.

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    Replies
    1. Lynn: I originally bought the gun to soak a neighbour's cat who thought the birds were its breakfast. It worked then too.

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  34. Wow, who knew birds were so destructive? Would love to see a shot of you squirting those birds.

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    Replies
    1. Alex J. Cavanaugh: I think most Australians (and particularly farmers) know how destructive the cockies can be. We are lucky that they are not as intelligent as New Zealand's kea.

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  35. Never dreamed you would become armed and dangerous:-)

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    Replies
    1. Granny Annie: I am often dangerous - armed or not.

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  36. Loved this post because it was about life, the (re) emergence of it.

    Greetings from London.

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    Replies
    1. A Cuban in London: Thank you. Life is a complicated, messy (and wonderful) affair.

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  37. It's as if they were wanting attention from you. Water gun great idea. The flowers are beautiful.

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    Replies
    1. Mason Canyon: It was attention they wanted, they succeeded. I really didn't need such a forceful reminder.

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  38. hahahahah!

    That is an impressive water pistol!!

    I would do the same thing to the perpetrators. : ))

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    Replies
    1. Caterina: They deserved it. The pigeons actually like to be sprayed. Bathe in it. Fortunately the cockatoos scoot.

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  39. Replies
    1. Author R. Mac Wheeler: Oh yes. I hope your temperatures are cooling down.

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  40. You crack me up! Sitting there locked and loaded, waiting for the destructive cockatoos. An old lady once hired me to blast at Kestrels, with a water gun, who frequented her bushes to kill sparrows and songbirds of all kinds. One knock from the air, although he recovered before hitting ground, with a blast of water, and he never returned.

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    Replies
    1. Strayer: The cockatoos are more persistent than your kestrel. A LOT more persistent. I hope their memories are good, because I would rather not have to defend that patch of turf again next spring.

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    2. Yes, the kestrel gave up easily. That is a dilemma, when you love flowers!

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    3. Strayer: I do love the garden, but I also love the birds. Except when they are destroying my hard work.

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  41. Shame on those cockatoos. Fire away, EC!

    Love,
    Janie

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  42. If it's any comfort, my plant-based battle since MY spring was with rats and squirrels that decided they were going to eat my garden. While this next year will have a cage to avoid just such a thing, this last year consisted of a few things including sprinkling the plants with mexican chili pepper.

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    Replies
    1. Robert Bennett: I am sorry to hear of your garden woes. The cockatoos weren't eating any of it. Just pulling it apart. Which, while the result is the same, is somehow worse.

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  43. Yay. Target practice with a water gun! Very clever! The sheer destruction of it would be hard to take! And such a beautiful looking bird too!

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    Replies
    1. Marie Smith: Pretty is as pretty does. They are beautiful and I do love them. They are also destructive arsewipes.

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  44. Shame on that bird, and it looks so nice and innocent!

    The flowers that have bloomed and have not been spoilt look lovely.

    All the best Jan

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    Replies
    1. Lowcarb team member ~Jan: Cockatoos are a lot of things, but innocent isn't one of them. Beautiful, noisy, destructive, charming...
      And thank you for your kind words about the undespoiled garden.

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  45. I have squirrels that dig up my bulbs some. It's frustrating when you're trying to make things pretty. Love your irises. I have some too, but won't see any until next spring.

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    Replies
    1. Natalie Aguirre: No squirrels over here. I believe they can be nearly as destructive and greedy as the cockies.
      I have three different sorts of iris. The Japanese Iris have been and gone. The Dutch iris and the bearded iris are about to flower. Except for the beautiful magenta one the cockies ripped apart.

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  46. Thank goodness the rest of the lovely flowers remained intact, EC. I very much like your pump action water gun. Sure looks like fun! Hugs...RO

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    Replies
    1. RO: My pacifist self is a little worried by just how much fun it was gunning down the miscreants. And yes, I am grateful that they left some garden beds alone. Hugs to you too.

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  47. Replies
    1. Lady Fi: It was, it is, but we still had some and there will be other years.

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  48. Good heavens! What have they got against daffodils?! Destruction for the sake of destruction? so reminds me of a certain leader...the gun looks wicked fun though :)

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    Replies
    1. Nilanjana Bose: Definitely destruction for destruction's sake. And the gun is a lot of fun.

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  49. You go, EC! That's the same weapon I used in my squirrel wars:) LOL. Little twits. Just because they can.
    Your garden is beautiful.

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    Replies
    1. Sandra Cox: Parts of the garden are beautiful. Sigh.

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  50. OMG! Did you know these birds do this kind of thing? It's good you fired back! I imagine they're quick learners. Glad they allowed your tulips to bloom. They're beautiful.

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    Replies
    1. Carol Kilgore: Cockatoos are known for being destructive. Sadly this time they concentrated on one corner of the garden and basically denuded it. A very few daffodils were allowed to bloom (and then shredded). Nothing else.

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  51. Replies
    1. Shammickite: My klutzy self would be in more danger than the birds.

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  52. I'd lite 'em up too. Each spring when our blueberries begin to bloom, mockingbirds ravish the early fruit. I have a BB gun. I don't shoot the birds, but I shoot over their heads. Apparently they can hear the BBs zipping by because they get the message.

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    Replies
    1. Rick Watson: Growing up we knew the fruit was ripe because the birds descended on the trees. En masse. Sadly the cockatoos weren't hungry, they were bored.

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  53. I've never heard about this before or even seen it! You keep going with your water gun!! I'm glad you still have some of your beautiful flowers! Big Hugs!

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    Replies
    1. Magic Love Crow: Thank you. For the moment at least they are leaving the garden alone. I am not sure whether my actions had any impact - or whether they had found new devilry...

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  54. The water pistol Is my favourite weapon too. I've become an expert shot with it. You have to..

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    Replies
    1. Treey: I am not an expert yet - but I am getting better.

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  55. So sorry about your flowers! I used to diligently listen and run out when a woodpecker would come to visit. I'd just throw my shoe at it so it would fly away (no way I could hit it, it was on the roof of our second story home). It became a game. He'd wait in the tree until I went in the house... and then start pecking on my house again. grr. Oh how I wish I'd had a water gun that would have reached him. I'd have been the one laughing then. ;)

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    Replies
    1. mail4rosey: The supersoaker has a pretty good range. Mind you, I am pretty certain the cockatoos DO laugh at me. Often.

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  56. Great water pistol. Lovely, lovely flowers. Gotta watch out for them for sure.

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    Replies
    1. Rasma Raisters: Sometimes they are too quick for me. Often they are too quick for me.

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  57. Replies
    1. The Happy Whisk: It worked. And they deserved it.

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  58. Those are very destructive birds. The water pump seems like a good solution and glad you haven't written them off those naughty little birds :)

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    Replies
    1. Denise inVA: Very, very destructive birds. It has only been our garden, but other people have suffered damage to their homes.

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  59. I cracked up seeing you model the water pistol! Looks very formidable.

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    Replies
    1. John Wiswell: It is my partner modelling the gun but yes, it is formidable. And effective.

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  60. Oh No, I had no idea they could be so destructive. Our family in Adelaide are delighted by visits from a Kookaburra, I hope it doesn't start destroying their garden. If it does I will be sure to recommend a water pistol. :-)

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    Replies
    1. Barbara Fisher: Kookaburras won't destroy the garden. They are distinctly carniverous - and I would be delighted to see them more often too.

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