Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Sunday, 26 November 2017

Sunday Selections #355

Sunday Selections was originally brought to us by Kim, of Frogpondsrock, as an ongoing meme where participants could post previously unused photos languishing in their files.
 
The meme is now continued by River at Drifting through life.  The rules are so simple as to be almost non-existent.  Post some photos under the title Sunday Selections and link back to River.  Clicking on any of the photos will make them embiggen.

Like River I usually run with a theme. I don't think I am alone is saying that we don't explore our own city enough.


Lake Burley Griffin is a lovely addition to my city.



Last week we went on a small outing, down to the lake.  After himself's recent trip the Beijing Gardens seemed an entirely appropriate place to visit.  They are close to the Chinese Embassy and while we quite often drive past them I don't remember stopping in before.  A mistake.  We enjoyed our visit.
 
The Cninese Embassy.




Beijing is one of the cities which has 'sister city' status with my own, and the Chinese gave us the Beijing Gardens to honour the connection.



We could just see it, through the trees.



 This is titled 'Bronze Galloping Horse Treading on a Flying Swallow' - which isn't an act of cruelty (precisely) but signifies just how fast the horse is travelling.


 The 'Stone of Appreciation' which signfies the recognised qualities of fineness, openness, perforation and wrinkling.



The next photos come from a sculpture depicting the four Celestial Symbols.


 The Azure Dragon (East/Spring).


The Scarlet Bird (South/Summer)


The White Tiger (West/Autumn).



 The Black Tortoise (North/Winter)



Some detail from the roof of the pagoda.

Isn't it a lovely area?  Nearby is a garden established to recognise our sister city status with Nara in Japan.  I will take you there soon too.

Next week we are going back to our National Gallery to see the hyper-real exhibition.  Photographs from the exhibition suggest that some of it will be very beautiful and some I will find confronting.



114 comments:

  1. Such intriguing sculptures. And I love the colors on the sails in that first picture.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jamie Ghione: We loved the splashes of colour too - and the sculptures.

      Delete
  2. interesting collection of photos. Love from Europe

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Gosia k: Thank you. I hope your weekend treats you kindly.

      Delete
  3. What a treasure to live near. Wonderful pictures and tour, I look forward to seeing the pictures of the Japanese garden.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ann Bennett: We are very lucky in the things we have close to hand. I will get to the Nara Peace Park - but our next trip to the National Gallery comes next. After a trip to the markets today.

      Delete
  4. Wow what a fascinating place, and all so beautiful. Love the bronze horse, full of character!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. LL Cool Joe: Isn't it? And I am still thinking about a horse so fast and powerful it leaves the swallows in its dust.

      Delete
  5. I always love your photos, especially on the water and the horse--as Joey says, full of character...Best to you and thanks for the e-mails!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. e: Thank you. If ever I get rich I will live by the water. And have lots of sculptures. A girl can dream. A girl should dream.

      Delete
  6. Lovely, thank you for the tour!!

    ReplyDelete
  7. Another beautiful place you've unveiled for us! Thank you for sharing your city, since I don't know if I'll ever get there in person. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. River Fairchild: I hope you can. I suspect we could spend happy hours snarking together. And in the interim I will wave temptation your way.

      Delete
  8. Hi EC - interesting how many links the Chinese have managed to make .. lovely lake and gardens ... and I love the sculptures ... gorgeous - especially the Stone of Appreciation ... while the Celestial Symbols are stunning works of art ... cheers Hilary

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hilary Melton-Butcher: I really liked the Stone of Appreciation and was chuffed to notice that spiders enjoyed the perforations. And celebrating wrinkles is a winner too.

      Delete
  9. Beautiful Chinese art, and the last one, it was fantastic, thanks EC.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bob Bushell: I liked the detail on the pagoda too. Rather a lot.

      Delete
  10. The stone of appreciation seems to be for me, celebrating wrinkling, as it does!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. kylie: I liked it - and noted that it wasn't sylph thin either.

      Delete
  11. the Chinese garden and embassy look wonderful
    Thanks for sharing

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sue in Italia/In the Land of Cancer: It is quite a small area, but lovely. And the Chinese Embassy is, like many of the others, a bit of a landmark. The British and the American Embassies are both quite dull, but they are in the minority.

      Delete
  12. Now that is not a part of Canberra I have seen. A wonderful tour. Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. CountryMum: I expect you have been very close to it without realising. It is an easy walk from there to Commonwealth Bridge.

      Delete
  13. It looks very authentic and delightful. I smiled at the wrinkled thingie and definitely can relate! :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. DJan: My wrinklie self can relate too. Though I am more of a jello consistency than stone.

      Delete
  14. Everything is so beautiful. I want to walk by the lake.

    Love,
    Janie

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Janie Junebug: We quite often go down to the lake, and I love it.

      Delete
  15. There certainly is much to see in and around Canberra...it's little wonder it achieved the recognition it did a few weeks ago from Lonely Planet. I look forward to our next jaunt!

    I hope you have a good week EC....cuddles to Jazz.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lee: Shhh. I would prefer that the beauties of Canberra were kept quiet.

      Delete
  16. It's interesting to contrast it with Sydney's Chinese Garden. This one makes use of plenty of space whereas the Sydney one makes use of very little space. Both achieve highly in different ways. It will certainly on our list for our next ACT visit.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Andrew: The space is deceptive - it is quite a small area. But lovely.

      Delete
  17. The Beijing Gardens are fabulous, Black Tortoise or no.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Joanne Noragon: I was fascinated that the Celestial Symbols had specific colours. And like the dragon rather a lot.

      Delete
  18. It does look really nice. It's awesome that you have a piece of harmonious culture there that is very different from you own.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. mail4rosey: We are lucky. And the city abounds in culture - not always harmonious.

      Delete
  19. What a pretty garden! I love the stone of appreciation, although I confess if I had a similar one I'd be be putting solar powered LED lights in all the little hollows.
    The roof detail is very nice.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. River: I suspect the spiders I saw might not like the LED lights. It could be really pretty though.

      Delete
  20. That is a lovely area.
    You are right. Sometimes we do not know our city very well. We look for something new elsewhere when we can find interesting places just around the corner so to speak... : ))

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Caterina: We go to some of the features of the city often, and others we largely ignore. Hopefully we will do better.

      Delete
  21. These are such lovely pictures; your city is full of beautiful places! The lake is gorgeous, and so is the photo through the trees. Like you, I would love to live by the water - the sea would be my first choice, global-warming notwithstanding, but a lake would be perfectly acceptable! I won't ever be able to afford to, though... I really like the Celestial Symbols (especially the dragon).

    Our nearest botanical gardens, a drive of about an hour and a half from here, has a Chinese Scholars' Garden, which is attractive but not nearly as spacious as yours. There is also an English flower garden, and Indian, Japanese and Italian (my favourite) gardens.

    Enjoy your week, EC, although I see it's getting quite hot there already, which you won't enjoy much :(

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Alexia: I have a huge weakness for dragons. Like you, the ocean would probably be my first choice, but a lake or a river would suffice. And I too will never be able to afford it. I don't think our Botanic Gardens features gardens from other cultures. I will have to investigate.
      It is warm here at the moment. And sticky. Bleah.

      Delete
  22. Lovely gardens, always good with a asian theme, we have one in Sydney rather small and crowded but very nice and we have one down the road in Auburn more like yours with more room to grow in the future.
    Merle............

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Merlesworld: I am interested in checking out the Japanese one which is just around the corner from this one. Soon. Ish.

      Delete
  23. I rather love that bronze flying horse.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Birdie: I did too, but I also liked the Stone of Appreciation. Appreciating wrinkles and imperfection is rare.

      Delete
  24. It is a beautiful garden, EC. Such wonderful and curious sculptures!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Marie Smith: I am a tad ashamed it took me so long to get there.

      Delete
  25. The Stone of Appreciation is a fitting counterpoint to Murr's post today!

    Lovely spot; I'm glad you got to explore it and that you shared it with us. Looking forward to the garden part, too.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. jenny_o: Most of the garden is devoted to the sculptures. And you are right about the Stone of Appreciation. Himself told me that Stones like that were not uncommon while he was away.

      Delete
  26. Couldn't agree more on that - we really don't explore our own cities enough. The gardens look awesome, really like the stone of appreciation, very cool piece. Thanks as always for showing me your world.

    Never stops baffling me why the human race chooses to destroy things when it has the power to create so much beauty instead...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nilanjana Bose: No arguments from me. At its best our species can create some incredible things. And its best is too often stifled, and the worst given free reign.

      Delete
  27. Dear EC
    Beautiful sculptures - I really like the horse and the four seasons ones in particular. Thank you for taking us along.
    Best wishes
    Ellie

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ellie Foster: They were/are such different sculptures and fit together beautifully.

      Delete
  28. This garden is beautiful. I especially love the four celestial symbols.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Rick Watson: I liked them too. Particularly the dragon.

      Delete
  29. Replies
    1. Starting Over, Accepting Changes - Maybe: It is isn't it? And often thought provoking.

      Delete
  30. all that history and art, lovely

    ReplyDelete
  31. All beauitiful but especially the Flying Horse and the Crane...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Molly Bon: There were four or five cranes - and I loved them.

      Delete
  32. OMGosh. How utterly beautiful. It looks like a place one could visit again and again. The flying horse took my breath away. Poor swallow:(
    Hope your day is filled with sparkle and your night peaceful slumber.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sandra Cox: So much of the lake calls for repeat visits. And we will go back to the Beijing Gardens. We have bright sunshine at the moment, sparkling after a torrential downpour. The rain was welcome (except when it poured through the kitchen ceiling) and the sunshine is too.
      Hope your day is wonderous.

      Delete
  33. Gosh...these are so absolutely amazing. Weirdly enough, the stone is my favorite. It makes me think of a beehive.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Robert Bennett: My wrinkly self really liked the Stone of Appreciation too.

      Delete
  34. Simply amaaaazing.
    Thank you for allowing us to live vicariously thru your photos! xxxx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My Inner Chick: Always happy to have you along.

      Delete
  35. Replies
    1. Author R. Mac Wheeler: Lots and lots. My greedy self loves it.

      Delete
  36. Looks a little bit exotic park. Lovely.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. orvokki: A little bit of China in Australia. It is nice isn't it?

      Delete
  37. Gorgeous sights, and it's very special to have sister city status. Like Margaret, I noticed how clean it looks. I'm impressed.
    Take care, EC.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Rawknrobyn: We have sister city status with Beijing and Nara and a friendship agreement with Dili in Timor Leste.
      I hope your week is treating you kindly.

      Delete
  38. Great pictures. Wonderful.

    Greetings, Marco

    ReplyDelete
  39. Thank you for the wonderful tour. Lovely photos. Enjoyed.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Rasma Raisters: Thank you. I hope your day is filled with sunshine.

      Delete
  40. It looks like such a serene place. You can almost feel the tension fall away just looking at the photos.
    You, have a lovely day.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sandra Cox: It is serene. And lovely. I hope your day is filled with wonder and joy.

      Delete
  41. The Chinese depiction of animals are always so amazing. I loved the picture you posted today of the horse.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. cleemckenzie: Chines and Japanese depictions of animals are incredible. Dragons for both, and I love Japanese cats paintings...

      Delete
  42. Oh this is delightful! Himself must have felt at home

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. because of all his Asian travels

      Delete
    2. Cloudia: He did. And I am pretty certain it triggered his wander lust again (which is never far from the surface).

      Delete
  43. There was a local movement to "date your city" - get out and see the beauty, understand the culture, visit the nooks and crannies. i very much like this idea - and you've done a glorious job excavating such a gem!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. daisyfae: 'Date your city' is a great idea. And something we are working on. Who knew that in our declining years we would be dating...

      Delete
  44. I love going places with you. I can sit here in the comfort of my home, thousands of miles away, and see all the lovely things you see. Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. mshatch: The blogosphere is excellent for us aimchair travellers isn't it?

      Delete
  45. What a fabulous area full of grace and beauty.

    ReplyDelete
  46. I also enjoy my travels with you and your photos! I can't thank you enough for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anne in the kitchen: Thank you. I hope you are beginning to feel much, much better and the lurgy is leaving.

      Delete
  47. Question, EC: What exactly is a sister city?
    Hope your day is filled with sparkle.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sandra Cox: A sister city is a form of legal or social agreement between towns, cities, counties, oblasts, prefectures, provinces, regions, states, and even countries in geographically and politically distinct areas to promote cultural and commercial ties.

      Delete
  48. You couldn't have picked a nicer place to go exploring, all thats needed now is a transporter, two to beam up Scotty.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Spacer Guy: A transporter/Tardis is something I would love to see.

      Delete
  49. Your photos always take me on a delicious trip to someplace I will never see in person, but through your lense, I travel. Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Glenda Council Beall: I too travel through the wonders of the blogosphere. And am grateful.

      Delete
  50. Wow!! Truly amazing area! I really love the statues!! The Celestial ones are my fav! Big Hugs!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Magic Love Crow: I liked them a lot too. And the roof of the pagoda. And the stone of appreciation.

      Delete
  51. I love the idea of sister cities (from your comment to Sandra- I didn't know anything about them before).

    Such fascinating pieces. I especially like the celestial symbol pieces. Thanks for shairing. :)
    ~Jess

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. DMS ~Jess: Sister cities is a lovely concept isn't it? It steps away from the us and them mindset - always a good thing.

      Delete
  52. Lovely, indeed! Amazing sculpture.

    ReplyDelete
  53. What a fantastic spot for photography and contemplation!
    Thank you so much for sharing the beauty of this special place.
    I especially like the "Stone of Appreciation" as I embody all of its qualities. Well, except fineness, openness and perforation, that is.

    Have a wonderful weekend, E.C.!

    ReplyDelete
  54. Quite beautiful the gardens to celebrate your sister city status. The lake, do people swim there? I always heard you had fresh water crocs in most of Australia so you could not safely swim in fresh water. Is this a myth in my head?

    ReplyDelete
  55. That brolga is absolutely outstanding. Do you know the name of the artist? I hope your computer issues are soon resolved

    ReplyDelete
  56. Lovely to see your photographs, the sculptures are amazing.

    All the best Jan

    ReplyDelete