Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Sunday, 10 June 2018

Sunday Selections #383

Sunday Selections was originally brought to us by Kim, of Frogpondsrock, as an ongoing meme where participants could post previously unused photos languishing in their files.
 
The meme is now continued by River at Drifting through life.  The rules are so simple as to be almost non-existent.  Post some photos under the title Sunday Selections and link back to River.  Clicking on any of the photos will make them embiggen. 
 
Like River I usually run with a theme. I said last week I would take you back to the National Museum and show you some of the 'So That You Migh Know Each Other:  Faith and Culture in Islam' exhibit.


 Islam is a contentious topic here in Australia, as it is in much of the world at the moment.  Sadly I believe that the majority are being tarred by the actions of fanatics.  And I am not a fan of fanatics of any flavour.

The title of the exhibition was apparently inspired by a verse in the Holy Qur'an and is an invitation to visitors to reach out in a spirit of curiosity, tolerance and peace.

Less talk, more photos.





A rug, and some detail from it.  Isn't it beautiful?  I was particularly drawn to the textiles in the exhibition.




I don't think camel riding is designed for comfort, beautiful as this saddle cloth is.





 Sorry about the blur.  I find taking photos through glass very challenging.







Travelling any distance in a boat like that one would be fraught with danger wouldn't it?  But they did.  






My ignorant self had never considered that the camels which are quite widespread in parts of our Northern Territory had come here with cameleers (a truly weird word).  Muslim cameleers.  We have had a Muslim component to our population for a very long time. 

And, in unrelated news, the roofers finally deigned to put in an appearance and finish their work last Friday.  Jazz is now safe from intruders until the next project starts in a couple of weeks.  And we have been assurred that work will be completed in a day.

138 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. Jamie Ghione: Thank you. Many of them aren't, but thank you.

      Delete
  2. Interesting artwork, including that on the outfits.
    I don't believe I would want to ride a camel.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Alex J. Cavanaugh: The smaller portion has been on a camel safari and thoroughly enjoyed it. He is MUCH more adventurous and less comfort loving than I am.

      Delete
  3. Perfect images of rugs, and the lovely items.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Those rugs are knotted from wools, beautifully dyed and spun tight for durability. So much work, so much time, so much sill!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Joanne Noragon: We were told that silk and metal threads were also used. So much more indeed - and they are still beautiful, sometimes hundreds of years later.

      Delete
  5. Beautiful rugs! Wonderful exhibit.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Thank you for including even the blurry ones, which are quite lovely too. What magnificent art! And glad to hear the roofers are done, at least. :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. DJan: It really was a lovely outing. And as always I was blown away by the workmanship.

      Delete
  7. As you know, I love much of the old Eastern art.And have been lucky to see a mere fraction of some.
    Thank you for the trip

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. dinahmow: You would have enjoyed this exibition. And others here too.

      Delete
  8. Thanks so much for presenting these images of fine quality art, and thanks even more for approaching it with an open mind and not succumbing to some of the crowd hysteria surrounding Muslims and their faith. There is more than enough fanaticism, extremism and intolerance in all religions to go around.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. David Gascoigne: Your final sentence is exactly as I feel. More than enough of those things indeed.

      Delete
  9. Hi EC - I went to an exhibition at the School of African and Oriental Studies in Bloomsbury, London before I left for here ... and have wonderful memories ... I think the paperwork I had, and the photos I took may have gone AWOL - things went wrong just as I was leaving and while I've been here ... if I have the photos I could concoct something.

    This must be amazing to see ... and obviously you loved it - their culture and art is so wonderful to see. Gorgeous photos, even through glass - I usually have me in them as well ... but fascinating to see, so thanks for sharing with us ... cheers Hilary

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hilary Melton-Butcher: African and Oriental Studies would have some absolute gems. I do hope you find your photos and paperwork. And yes, we both thoroughly enjoyed the exhibition and our wander in the museum.

      Delete
  10. Great photos. As an Interfaith minister, Islam was one the religions I had to study. I am accepting of all faiths and beliefs. It hurts me when I see one group lumped together like they do with Muslims. There is an Arab family in my building who are some of the nicest people in the world. Their children are so well mannered. The teenage boy jumps up to open the door for me and if I have packages he helps me to my door. One doesn't find that very often.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. mxtodis123: Lumping groups together (any group) is not only wrong it is silly. I am glad that your interaction with the Arab family in your buiding is so positive. And I am glad for them too.

      Delete
  11. You got some great photos. Taking photos in dull conditions and through glass are the most difficult because the shutter speed is slower which is what causes the blurring. I know this myself from the aquarium we visited yesterday!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. LL Cool Joe: And the pesky fish won't stay still either. I have had some epic fails at acquariums - and look forward to your photos.

      Delete
    2. to photograph moving fish, set your camera to the "sports" setting which makes the necessary adjustments for moving objects.

      Delete
    3. River: Thank you. That is a setting I use very little. Some experiments are in order.

      Delete
  12. Exquisite artwork. You can't buy that at K Mart!

    An interesting exhibition, one worth seeing.

    I hope your week ahead is a pleasant one, EC. Cuddles to Jazz....when he stops jumping up and down, cheering, now the roofers have completed their work! :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lee: Jazz is very happy indeed at a house free of tradies. I feel a tad guilty that his peace will be short-lived. It was a delightful exhibition filled with things of beauty.

      Delete
  13. I so agree with regarding Islam. What a wonderful exhibit. The rug is gorgeous, and I really love the little tea cup. Very pretty.Thanks for sharing, so many interesting and pretty pieces. The details are impressive.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sandy: There was a heap of beautiful work. Intricate and hard-wearing beautiful work.

      Delete
  14. such beautiful creations, its so true, we should judge all by a few,, I am amazed how camels were such a prominent feature in Australia, we just watched a documentary about that very subject and how the camels were brought to Australia,,it also spoke of how many of the camels are raised now for food, I guess I never thought of the poor things being eaten, ,, its good to know the workers will be finished in a day!! I always hated when workers come,, I just didn't like my space invaded lol,, I am an introvert!!!! Through and through,, oh my,,,,

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. laurie: I don't like workers in the house either. Unlike Jazz I don't growl and hide it the wardrobe or under the bed. I have been tempted though.

      Delete
  15. The artistic work of the Middle East has long been a source of wonder for me, especially the textiles and tile work. Beautiful and intricate.
    Camels are rather fascinating creatures, aren't they? I hear they have personalities similar to Jazz... ;) I'm glad he's now safe from intruders. For the moment.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. River Fairchild: Snap. The textiles, the tile work, the music...
      Jazz makes a camel seem sociable.

      Delete
  16. I like the colours in the rugs and textiles.
    I enjoyed seeing your photo's, it looks a very good exhibition.

    Glad to read that your roof is finished.

    All the best Jan

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lowcarb team member~Jan: We are glad that the roof is fixed too, but the superstitious illogical part of me wonders whether we will ever get rain again now (the part that believes washing the car will bring rain).

      Delete
  17. The cup and saucer is lovely

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. John Gray: Isn't it? I would very happily use them.

      Delete
  18. What a beautiful display. I would have loved to have seen it but since I can’t thank you for the pictures.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Birdie: We spend a couple of very happy hours there, and could hear murmurs of appreciation from the other visitors too.

      Delete
  19. Rich culture and traditions.
    Beautiful!
    : )

    ReplyDelete
  20. It was clearly a really interesting exhibition. I love the textiles, and the beautiful cup and bowl - everything reminded me of my time in Turkey, which is truly one of the most interesting and beautiful countries I have ever been to.

    I also agree about generalisations such as the ones about Islam. They are usually based on ignorance and can be harmful, and sometimes dangerous.

    Have an enjoyable week!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Alexia: Himself loved Turkey and has been back several times. And to Iran. And Egypt.
      And I agree with you wholeheartedly about the danger of generalisations. Particularly sweeping condemnation.

      Delete
  21. Very interesting exhibit — i enjoy studying and comparing cultures.

    ReplyDelete
  22. I so agree with you, EC, fanatics of any flavour are dangerous. I love the Muslim cultural artefacts in this exhibition and find them fascinating. Thank you for sharing because I'm not planning to be in Canberra in the near future so would definitely have missed it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. catmint: Fanatics scare me. Sadly there are a lot about. When next you do get to my city I hope you will contact me.

      Delete
  23. Always weirdo's in most cultures if not all - so can't blame all.
    Looks a nice exhibition..

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Margaret-whiteangel: We certainly have some weirdos of our own. Ugly ones.
      It was a wonderful exhibition.

      Delete
  24. Isn't it interesting that we know there were Afghan cameleers but I took a long time to realise they were Afghanis and didn't think about them being muslim. Your post reminded me that my grandpa (who was born in 1912) used to call muslims Mohammedans so youknow, if he had a word for it, he probably was at least vaguely familiar.

    Talking of religions in Australia, did you see outback rabbis? They found a surprising number of hidden Jewish people who often didn't even know they were :)

    I love the artwork, it's right up my alley

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. kylie: I missed outback rabbis. I hope they repeat it.
      My father also used to call muslims Mohammedans.
      And like you, I loved the artwork. Some of the jewellery was great too.

      Delete
  25. I love their textiles very much, the rugs, the clothes and that table right under the camel saddle cloth photo.

    ReplyDelete
  26. I agree with you about the peaceful masses being spoiled by the ugly few. We learned about the cameleers in grade six, I think.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. River: I learned about the cameleers but don't recall being told that they were Muslim.

      Delete
  27. I quite like the patterns on the china. There are many people around Broken Hill with Afghan cameleer heritage, and plenty of camels too. They are one of our terrible imported pests in Australia. Mother has been waxing lyrically about her two wonderful Moslem nurses in hospital. One held my hand, she said, and she had the most lovely eyes. They are so kind, she added.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Andrew: We don't have a good record about the things we import do we? Rabbits, Camels, Barnaby Joyce....I am sorry to hear that your mother is still in hospital, and hope all is well. I am very glad that she received kind treatment - and mentioned it to you.

      Delete
  28. Dear EC

    I really enjoying seeing beautifully crafted objects from different cultures. There is so much to be enjoyed and learned from them. Thank you very much for sharing the exhibition.
    If I could have one wish, it would be for religious tolerance because that might help to bring about peace.
    Best wishes
    Ellie

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ellie Foster: Tolerance (including religious tolerance) would certainly not go astray. Sadly it seems to be in short supply.
      Aren't those textiles beautiful?

      Delete
  29. lovely exhibit, amazing work in the details of each piece

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Linda Starr: I was super impressed at the detail and the durability. Some of those rugs and costumes were literally hundreds of years old.

      Delete
  30. These pieces are pretty fantastic, and the colors are quite vivid. I love the opportunity to look and learn about different cultures and religion throughout the world, nd appreciate you sharing this ! Hugs...RO

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. RO: I am so grateful that the internet brings our world closer, and also grateful for the many exhibitions my city hosts.

      Delete
  31. I learned some of the history of camels in Australia when I read the book Tracks. And also of the problem with feral camels and how dangerous the males can be. Some of those textiles, tunics, are very beautiful.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Strayer: She wrote an intriguing book didn't she? I thoroughly enjoyed Tracks - and still didn't make the muslim connection.

      Delete
  32. Thank goodness the roofers came back and finished!

    So many different pieces. I always enjoy looking at work done by other cultures because the patterns and styles are so interesting. Thanks for sharing! :)
    ~Jess

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. DMS ~ Jess: I am grateful that the roofers finally returned too. They had been absent for a little over a week.
      Other cultures fascinate me.

      Delete
  33. Other nationalities put so much more colour into their lives than we North Americans do.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. only slightly confused: Our culture is not nearly as beautiful as a lot of others as well. Less colourful, less intricate...

      Delete
  34. Fascinating photos. Most interesting to see this about other cultures. Thank you for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Rasma Raisters: It is always fascinating to be given a window into other cultures isn't it? Some differences, and some huge similarities.

      Delete
  35. Lovely selection of photos. I, too, enjoy textiles very much. The detail on the rug is fantastic. I also really like tiles and ceramic work. The pattern on the coffee cup is very pretty.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bea: I agree wholeheartedly. I would very happily drink from that cup, and have been blown away by Islamic tile work often.

      Delete
  36. The clothes & the rug are gorgeous!!

    ReplyDelete
  37. Beautiful pics. I especially love that cup and saucer!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Molly Bon: It would be an ornament to any table wouldn't it?

      Delete
  38. As everybody in the entire world knows, our deeply embarrassing administration is very anti-islam (without probably any proper knowledge of Islam). Since I have been to Muslim countries I can't really follow this anit-attitude, and I look forward to the extension to our family by a huge Muslim branch this summer. I look forward to spending a couple weeks in this culture again and getting a bit closer to our new family members. This exhibition your showed us has some beautiful and unique items. I wish I had a rug like that...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Carola Bartz: There are sections of our government who are in complete agreement with your administration on this issue. And seek to divide us with fear and nastiness. I refuse to play their game.
      Loved hearing that your family is expanding and look forward to hearing (and seeing) more.
      And a big yes to longing for that rug.

      Delete
  39. A marvelous exhibit EC, thank you for sharing. Reading blog accounts such as yours brings us all a little closer, and makes the world not as much of a scary place as those who try to make it so. Educating ourselves leads to more understanding, manipulation using fear does not.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Denise inVA: Manipulation using fear is a sadly successful tactic which benefits no-one. I am so glad to see other approaches in play.

      Delete
  40. This makes me want to ride a well-dressed camel whilst playing one of those stringed instruments.

    ReplyDelete
  41. I had no idea that you have camels in northern Australia - that's a bit mind blowing! Thank you for sharing your photos of the exhibition. Strong colours, intricate patterns, unique items. I am always grateful for exposure to other cultures because as a non-traveller it is the only way I can learn.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. jenny_o: I too am very grateful for exposure to other cultures. For similar reasons. I really, really hope I can continue to learn each and every day.

      Delete
  42. And I am glad to hear your roofing is complete! Only a fraction as glad as you folks and Jazz, but glad :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. jenny_o: Thank you. Jazz is perhaps gladest of all. I shudder to think how he will react when the heating system is replaced in a few weeks.

      Delete
  43. Awesome that your roofing is done. And interesting post!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nas: Thank you. It is very good indeed to have roofing finally crossed off the to-do list.

      Delete
  44. Such colourful pieces in a fascinating exhibit. I'll bet Jazz is pleased about the roof!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Carolyn McBride: Jazz is very, very happy. He would repel all boarders if he got his druthers.

      Delete
  45. Thanks for the lovely pictures. I especially like the rugs. Glad your roof will finally get done.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Myrna R.: Thank you. I was a huge fan of the rugs too.

      Delete
  46. Good morning and thank you for bringing us along. This is just my kind of place to tour and dream about the lives that touched these pieces. There's always a wonderful tale of sorts for each and everything. Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Karen S.: Snap. I often wonder about lives of the makers of such beauties.

      Delete
  47. Many thanks for those amazing pictures...they are so beautiful and colourful. It is always really interesting to see how people from different cultures dress and decorate their living spaces etc.
    So glad to hear you have finally got your roof fixed. Brilliant!☺☺

    Hugs xoxoxo

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ygraine: Thank you. I am always amazed at how many aspects of our lives are similar - despite the different cultures. And hope that the weather proofing of the roof gets tested soon. We really need rain.

      Delete
    2. Haha...will send some English rain your way (although you may well regret it)! lol

      Delete
    3. Ygraine: I doubt it. I really doubt it. Drought is a destroyer.

      Delete
  48. That cup and saucer is exquisite.
    A peaceful week to you, EC.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Rawknrobyn: Isn't it? I hope your week is filled with joy.

      Delete
  49. I got to experience Muslim art in Sevilla and Cordoba Spain last December. Remarkable. And while a good portion of Europe was in the Dark Ages, the Spanish Muslim world was in enlightment and relative peace between the 3 major religions there.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sue in Italia/In the Land of Cancer: Yes. And we owe rather a lot in some very varied fields (including mathematics, astronomy, and medecine) to Muslima.

      Delete
  50. Great photos EC! Truly interesting to experience other cultures! Happy the roofers are finished their work! Hope everything gets done soon! Just to let you know, something small is coming through the mail for you! Sorry I'm so behind! Alot going on! Big Hugs!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Magic Love Crow: It is always a good thing to broaden our horizons isn't it? We are very, very glad the roofers are done - and I look forward to the treat in the mail. Which was totally unnecessary. Hugs.

      Delete
    2. Magic Love Crow. Thank you so much - and huge hugs.

      Delete
  51. Such a rich culture! It's terrible to see how there is so much prejudice against Muslims.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lady Fi: It is indeed. And exhibitions like this are a small step in the right direction.

      Delete
  52. Ditto on the prejudice problem here in the US. What a lovely exhibit. And wonderful photos.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Galen Pearl: It is a lovely exhibit. Sigh on the prejudice which thrives world wide. And thank you.

      Delete
  53. Love that musical instrument.

    ReplyDelete
  54. Religions are fascinating in that their level of nuance reveals the hopes and beliefs of people who will do anything to get to heaven.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Spacer Guy: And sadly the lengths to which they will go to keep other people out.

      Delete
  55. These are lovely, even the blurries are okay...I've learned and seen more about camels here than I ever knew. Thanks. Still coughing here.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. e: I am so very sorry to hear you are still coughing. Not fair. So not fair.

      Delete
  56. Great exhibit, showing the other side of people's culture is a good way to start understanding them, there needs to be work done on both sides, but the good people usually make an effort, whilst the horrors spread hate. On both sides.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Starshine Twinkletoes: How right you are. And realising that there is good and bad on both sides is an excellent starting point.

      Delete
  57. Dear EC, that rug is gorgeous--no other word for it! And all the other artifacts and the clothing show a creativity and a culture that I find intriguing.

    Like you, I have little patience with fanatics--I think I may have been one a couple of times in my life!!! And like you, I also believe that this on-going distrust of Muslims is an example of "one apple spoiling the bushed/barrel." It is so easy to dismiss a whole group on the basis of one small contingent's actions.

    Take care as all this work is being done. I hope you can go to the deep center of yourself where peace lies and rest within it. Peace.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dee: If only that rug could talk. I would love to hear about the women (I assume women) who made it, and the people who have sat on it, walked on it, admired it in the hundreds of years after its creation.

      Delete
    2. Dear EC, your thoughts could become a wonderfully interesting novel! Peace.

      Delete
    3. Dee: Thank you. Somedays my thoughts are horror stories.

      Delete
  58. The fabrics are beautiful aren't they. I have 4 similar woven rugs but none are as beautiful as that one.
    Last year there was a shooting at a mosque in Quebec City, 6 people killed while at prayer. Our local Christian community joined with the local Muslim community and marched in unity along the Main Street in support of togetherness and tolerance. I am hoping this will continue.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Shammickite: I join you in hoping that the spirit of togetherness and tolerance continues. And spreads. World-wide.
      And love the fabrics and the rugs on display. So much.

      Delete
  59. Making blog rounds, so popping in to say hi. Thanks for your visits, always appreciated.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sandy: Thank you. And visiting your blog is never a chore.

      Delete
  60. Wonderful exhibit, I love the history, and also the connection with Australia (I was totally unaware!).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Spare Parts and Pics: It was a wonderful exhibition, and I love learning that such an old culture has had such a long presence here.

      Delete
  61. The artwork you have shared is utterly exquisite, those textiles, wow. I kept wanting to reach out and touch them

    ReplyDelete
  62. That exhibit supports one of the reasons I love museums so much. Not only are the exhibits beautiful and educational, but they promote better understanding. Hopefully. (Then again, I suppose the people who need to be enlightened about the culture of a people they claim to hate wouldn't be very likely to visit the exhibit.)

    When I was in high school, I dated a beautiful boy from Syria. His brother and his wife were American citizens, and they invited me to their home several times. They weren't Muslim, but they had the most marvelous fabrics and furniture in their home. And they all treated me like a queen.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Susan: Living in hope is somewhere I spend a lot of time. I so agree with you about museums, and was glad to see classes of school children in this exhibition. And having a marvellous time.

      Delete
  63. Islamic art is beautiful. Your photos are gorgeous.

    Greetings from London.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. A Cuban in London. Thank you. It is beautiful isn't it? Intricate and lovely.

      Delete
  64. How lovely! So much of it reminds me of items in my Turkish family's home (my niece is married to man from Turkey. So my great niece has Turkish heritage, too.)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lynn: My partner said much the same thing as we wandered round. He loved Turkey. And I have never heard of anyone visiting who didn't.

      Delete