Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Sunday, 29 March 2020

Sunday Selections #474




Sunday Selections was originally brought to us by Kim, of Frogpondsrock, as an ongoing meme where participants could post previously unused photos languishing in their files.

Huge thanks to Cie who gave me this wonderful Sunday Selections image.
  
The meme was then continued by River at Drifting through life.  Sadly she has now stepped aside (though she will join us some weeks), and I have accepted the mantle.
 
The rules are so simple as to be almost non-existent.  Post some photos under the title Sunday Selections and link back to me. Clicking on any of the photos will make them embiggen. 
 
I usually run with a theme.  This week (and for several weeks to come) my theme is beauty.  Like most people we are mostly at home at the moment.  I know the world is a scary place right now, but the beauty remains and that is where I am choosing to focus.


Mostly on beauty close to home.  I always enjoy dawn and dusk (and skyscrapes more generally).  I am revelling in them now.  These were taken just after first light across a number of days.  I am constantly blown away by how quickly they change.





 

 And then to the birds.  Many of you have heard me complain about the sulphur crested vandals.  They have been joined by the corellas and are shredding a neighbour's tree.  The ground is festooned with branches and leaves plucked and dropped.  Sometimes there are up to thirty of them in the tree and once, shrieking and destroying.  I hope the tree can recover. 




And now a few shots of them in less destructive mode.


First a sulphur crested cockatoo - and we have been gifted with not one but two of those sunny crest feathers this week. 


And then a long beaked corella.  This one has honoured us, and will now eat from a seed bucket we hold in our hands.

In our dreadful fires this summer we lost many of our native birds and animals.  Despite the dreadful noise they make I am overjoyed to say that several visiting corellas have young birds with them.  Birds who whinge and complain incessantly until they are fed.


This bird with his beak open was in full voice.  And went on and on and on and on.  And on and on.  I was pleased to see it being fed.  Which shut it up for nearly thirty seconds.



We spend a LOT of time each day watching the birds, feeding the birds, cleaning up after the birds.  Time well spent.

We had a small outing yesterday and went down the lake for a kangaroo fix.  And found them.  A 'fix' post will follow but I leave you with this youngster I photographed in 2013 who melted my heart, then and now.



Stay safe and stay well.  

134 comments:

  1. Well it's nice to have the birds to watch. I have quite a few this year, mostly house finches and chickadees, besides the ever present Oregon Juncos and a few mourning doves but they don't come as often now.

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    1. Strayer: It is lovely to have the birds to watch. We often get eight or nine native species visiting each day and have learned to recognise some individuals.

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  2. I'm glad to hear that there are still babies being born to the bird population around there, even if it is really fall in your neck of the woods. I'm hoping you are staying safe and keeping yourself busy. I've become a slug. :-)

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    1. DJan: I know just how hard being a slug must be for you. I am spending more time in the garden and there is plenty of things inside I could/should be doing. I do hope you can find a new routine which works for you.

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  3. Dear EC
    The are such vandals, but so pretty. It's good there are some youngsters too. The kangaroo is so sweet - I like the way his/her ear has flopped over.
    Best wishes
    Ellie

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    1. Ellie Foster: I was thrilled to see the youngsters. I don't think our King Parrots were able to breed this year, and hope next year is better. That flopped ear melted my heart.

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  4. That first photo is a stunner.
    I wonder why that tree is so tasty to them?

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    1. Alex J. Cavanaugh: I don't know why that tree has taken their fancy. It had seeds on it, but they have stripped the seed and are now concentrating on the leaves and the branches. Other trees of the same type receive only a cursory inspection.

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  5. I always enjoy your sky, your birds, your flowers aND your kangaroo fix... they have calming powers. Thank you! :))

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    1. Caterina: I am glad. All those things calm me down too.

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  6. Those are such beautiful skies you have captured, with their blue, mauve, and grey - and the clouds of pink, peach, and yellow. It IS amazing, isn't it, how quickly the sky changes at dawn and dusk. It reveals just how fast our world revolves under our feet and we don't even think about it the rest of the time.

    Those baby corollas look nearly as big as the parents and are still being fed! The image of grown children living in the basement somehow comes to mind - hah! They are so beautiful. I'm glad there is another generation of babies despite the adversities of the summer.

    Looking forward to the roos in future posts - the one in today's photo is very droll with his ear turned inside out like a pet dog's :)

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    1. jenny_o: Sometimes the birds being fed look bigger than the adults and often they look better fed than their overworked parents.
      I am endlessly fascinated by just how fast the sky changes at dawn and dusk (and often take dozens of photos which are all the same and all very different).
      That roo looked totally oblivious to the turned ear didn't it?

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    2. Yes, he did!

      And why oh why can I not remember how to spell corella? A corolla is a car, not a bird :)

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    3. jenny_o: Not a problem. I knew what you meant and suffer from dyslexic fingers myself. I have some words that I invariably have problems with, for example I almost always mistype David Gascoigne's surname on the first attempt. And just did it again.

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  7. Beautiful skies, so vivid. And the Cockatoo, wonderful images.

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    1. Bob Bushell: Thank you. I am still thinking about the stunning hawk you posted today.

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  8. I've always loved how baby birds can appear the same size as the parent. My mother and brother were eating at a restaurant. In the window, a bird had built a nest which was visible from their table. There is nothing so touching as a parent taking care of their child.

    Take care.

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    1. Ann Bennett: That restaurant (and that table) would get repeat visits from me. I am often blown away by the care that birds and animals provide - and think it is positive proof that they DO feel emotion (which I have never doubted).

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  9. I wish I could see your photos, I know they’re beautiful, I’m drawn to dusk and dawn as well and I love the moon,,, and the moon loves me lol, couldn’t resist!

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    1. Laurie: I wish you could see my photos too. Dawn is probably my favourite time of day, but I also love the moon.

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  10. I love that ear having a rest! :)

    The sulphur-crested vandals have been very noisy around here over the past couple of weeks, but they seem to have moved on to greener pastures. Probably gone into self-isolation somewhere else!

    Keep safe and well, ED...have a good week. Cuddles to Jazz. :)

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    1. Lee: The sulphur-crested vandals laugh at the concept of isolation here. They arrive in numbers, shrieking to announce their arrival.
      I hope you and the furry overlords can also stay safe and well.

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  11. I enjoyed showing my son your photos. It's funny that the young birds complain all the time. Where does Australia stand with COVID-19? I hear about the U.S., China, and Italy.

    Love,
    Janie

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    1. Janie Junebug: Covid-19 has hit us too. At the moment the numbers are rising, and there have been deaths. Not as many as in some parts of the world, but too many.
      I think that youngsters of all species know how to make their wants/needs/wishes felt. I hope your son enjoyed the photos too.
      Stay well. And I do hope your allergies recede.

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    2. Janie Junebug: I am glad - and thank you for letting me know.

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  12. How wonderful to see your lovely skies, they are always forever changing, magical and surprising such glorious gifts. Your birds are inspiring how they are each busy just living in the moment, all joyous and carefree. The kangaroo is sweet too! Enjoy your day and the new week ahead.

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    1. 21 Wits: Thank you. I adore the sky and quite a lot of dawns see the mad woman with her camera standing the in middle of the road.
      I too adore the birds - and the roo. Have a wonderful and safe week.

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  13. It is, indeed, wonderful to focus on the beauty around us and leave the horrific headlines behind for a bit. I always enjoy your shots of the sky and the many birds you are surrounded by. Hugs to you as always.

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    1. River Fairchild: I cannot focus on the news for long. It makes me angry and despairing. Even the vandals are a better option.
      Hugs to you too - stay safe please.

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  14. Beautiful birds, i wish they could find some better use of their time than destroying trees.

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    1. messymimi: They were just being themselves. I have no idea why this one tree is getting all of their attention at the moment and do hope it can recover.

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  15. That first sky shot is so lovely. The baby bird made me laugh - how very like a human kid, about a 2-yr-old equivalent I'd say. And Mr Floppy is very sweet. That happens to Manu's ear/s sometimes - it doesn't seem to bother him at all.

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    1. Alexia: I was stopped in my tracks by the sky the morning I took the first photo. Fortunately I did remember to lift my camera, but quite a number of shots went by as I stood and marvelled.
      I have heard teenagers at least as insistent as the young corella (though it isn't usually food they are whinging for). I like the 'Mr Floppy' name, and we was totally unconcerned. One of our German Shepherds used to have one ear fall when she was tired. It perked up after a nap.

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  16. OMG! That kangaroo is darling! The birds are spectactular. I feed birds tooo but my problem is that the squirrels think they're birds and eat all the seed I put out for the bird. The cardinals are my favorite I think but the little chickadees are so tiny and cute. I think I'll go out back and watch them now...Take care and stay safe

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    1. Mildred Ratched: I don't think I have a favourite - but would love to see your cardinals. Enjoy your time with the birds. I have been feeding ours and marvelling at them this morning (of course).

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    1. Giancarlo: Thank you - and to you and yours. I do hope you are safe from the virus which has been particularly nasty in your country.

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  18. You do have to be quick with the camera at times when taking sky shots. So good to see some of our native birds are thriving. A couple of weeks ago we were invaded by a couple of hundred corellas who got stuck into the plane tree seed pods. They would work over a couple of trees and then move to the next. Fortunately they are not as loud as sulphur crested cockatoos.

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    1. Andrew: Sometimes (often if the truth be told) I am not quick enough with my camera. I would rather listen to a flock of cockatoos than one whinging baby corella - which says something about the noise they produce.

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  19. You definitely find beauty around you and I'm delighted that you share it with us. I think I am drawn to sunrises more as it's the beginning of a new day. We don't have birds like yours but the ones we have had are having to compete with the squirrels. It seems no matter what we do, they find a way to get on the feeders. Thanks again for sharing your beautiful photos. Stay safe and well my friend.

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    1. Mason Canyon: I am a beauty addict. I look for it, and have convinced myself I need it. Fortunately it is everywhere. Dawn is my favourite part of the day too, at least in part because it is quiet and I often have it too myself. Selfish aren't I? I hope that you too are safe and well.

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  20. I am very happy to read once again of your attitude towards these fabulous birds, Sue. They are vandals, they are destructive, only by our standards of course, but in reality they are cockatoos being cockatoos. I cannot tell you how incredible I have found them whenever I have had the great privilege of visiting Australia and seeing them. I hope that I will get to do it one more time, although right now the Coronavirus is playing havoc with my plans. Stay well.

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    1. David M. Gascoigne: Of course I love them, despite the damage they do. I do try and discourage them from digging up my bulbs (and often fail). They are birds of infinite charm and have adapted to life in the city remarkably well.
      I knew that you had a trip to Australia planned for later this year. I hope it won't be too long before you can reschedule. You and Miriam stay well too please. I do love that she is making the masks which are in such short supply.

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  21. Your skies are beautiful, after the terrible fires.

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    1. Joanne Noragon: They are. I am so glad to no longer be able to see the air that I breathe and revel in the beauty each and every day.

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  22. It is a rare thing to see exotic birds in our garden. Most settle on our roof. The Mynah birds which carry lice often took our pussycats bickies left on the BBQ table, they have been replaced by RATSACK and the Mynah's love it, But their numbers are becoming less so it seems.

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    1. Vest: We have the occasional Indian Mynah, but they are rare. I am not a fan of poison - too many 'other' things than the intended target will eat it. It is pigeons who crowd our roof.

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    2. it is estimated that for every known bird on the central coast they are opposed by a dozen or more lice carrying Mynahs,. Sadly we are being encouraged to get rid of them.
      Incidently , I a couple of years ago rescued a Mynah chick which had fallen from a nest in the eaves of our garage. Bad move, within a half hour I had a rash on my arms up to my shoulder which when treated took about a fortnight to disappear.not funny.

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    3. Vest: We too are encouraged to get rid of the Indian Mynahs. It was the method you used which bothered me. As I said on your latest post my brother uses the traps which gives the bird a quick and painless end and doesn't risk other birds or animals.

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  23. The parrots are beautiful but have to agree they are ever so noisy and cause much destruction to trees and crops, but you just can't help but love them. The sky is also lovely.
    Keep well and safe.

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    1. Margaret D: Noisy, destructive, incontinent vandals - and yes they are also much loved.
      We are fine and hope that you too keep safe and well.

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  24. We have the Sulphur Cresteds in the only pine tree left around here, happily picking off and dropping pine cones all over the footpath. I don't think there are many, I haven't heard a lot of noise, maybe only a couple. I don't think I've ever seen any of the babies. I did see a couple of dozen rainbow lorikeet babies over a year ago in the gum trees behind the garages at the back of the flats where I have a bunch of stuff stored that doesn't fit inside. I remember the twittering whistling and all the fluttering as they learned to get from one branch to another. Stay safe.

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    1. River: Lucky you. I don't think I have ever seen Rainbow Lorikeet babies. We do see young Cockatoos - but they are not quite as noisy as the Corellas - which is strange because the adults are noisier.

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    2. Wandering around the garden at my last home and beyond were many fledgling lorikeets unable to fly , evidence of their demise could be seen on the ground. my wife and I would pick them up and put them in our shed for WIRES to collect

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    3. Vest: I am sorry to read that, and sorry that you and Rosemary had to see it. We lose an occasional bird to the dreadful beak and feather disease (cockatoos) but other than that the birds which visit are healthy.

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  25. I love the birds, even with them being messy. They are beautiful. I miss all of the diverse wildlife I saw as a kid in the tropics. That Kangaroo is a youngster. How long do they live

















    I

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    1. e: I am not surprised you miss the very varied birds and animals you grew up with. These are Eastern Grey Kangaroos and they live from eight to twelve years in the wild. I would be surprised if this one is a year old. I took the photo in 2013, and hope he is thriving where ever he is.

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  26. The thing I remember most about raising zebra finches was how much noise a nest full of babies could make at feeding time! Makes me smile now. They were in my computer room many years ago.

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    1. Bill: I think youngsters of most species are very, very noisy. I am very glad you smile thinking of your zebra finches.

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  27. The first and the last one are my favourites!☺

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  28. How lovely to see clear skies again and then visiting corellas. Do they yet know what species were lost in the fires. Funny how the corellas strip one tree and not others. Love the Joey. I had a German Shepherd who's ears never came up.

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    1. Jo: The clear skies are wonderful. Mind you, yesterday my partner showed me a photo from the national park nearest us. At least one of the trees in it is STILL burning. The park is still closed.
      We had a German Shepherd whose left ear dropped every time she was tired.

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  29. Hi EC - I hear you re the Corella's noise ... I used to get frustrated that I had a friend from South Africa, who when we spoke on the phone, would ask me to 'hang' the phone out of the window so she could hear the gulls! But how wonderful the birds are reproducing and adding to the diminished populations - those fires were monstrous.

    Lovely skies though ... believe it or not - we had snow in the north this morning and have had hail here on 'gale-type' winds ...

    That tree looks like decimation descended ... not a few birds! I hope it recovers ... take care and look after you and yours - all the best - Hilary

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    1. Hilary Melton-Butcher: I can't tell you how happy I was to see that some at least of the corellas had a successful breeding season. Lots of them go to the nearby National Park to breed and I was afraid we had lost a whole generation.
      The tree looks worse by the day. Most of the leaves have gone now, so the birds are trimming/hacking off branches.
      I hope you too will take care, and stay safe and healthy.

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  30. WOW, such stunning sky photos...I really love these!
    And the beautiful birds. Such a pity they can be so destructive. I do hope your neighbour's tree recovers...πŸ˜’
    The final photo is so cute...I really love kangaroos!!😊😊

    Take care, my friend...and have a great week!

    Much love and hugs ❤❤❤❤❤❤❤

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    1. Ygraine: Thank you dear friend. We love the skies, the birds and kangaroos too. I hope that tree will recover - it is looking sadder by the day. Hugs and love to you. Today and every day.

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  31. These are such lovely photos, all of them! I love silhouette pictures (and used to use them in class when I was teaching my after school art club). And the birds, destructive or not, are simply beautiful! And I have a soft spot in my heart for kangaroos. They are such unusual -- and beautiful -- creatures. I hope you are well and safe from the corona virus.

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    1. Elizabeth Varadan, Author: Thank you. I have a very soft place in my heart for the birds and the kangaroos as well.

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  32. Such beautiful photos as always.

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  33. Gorgeous colours, elegant shapes (apart from the monster ones which are just funny) and a whole sky full of them.
    What happens to them afterwards? Are they collected and stored for next time?

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    1. Friko: We often see a few balloons in the air here, and welcome them. I hope that the other balloons which come to the Balloon Spectacular return home and continue to fly (in more normal times) rather than being mothballed.

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  34. Your avian visitors must be great company, EC. Thank you for sharing them!

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    1. Marie Smith: They are wonderful company. I find them beautiful and fascinating - even when they are in destructo mode.

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  35. As always your pictures are great. I love seeing the birds that you get to see. I love sunrise and sunset pictures. I've seen some great ones here when we get the storms.

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    1. Mary Kirkland: Storm (which we rarely get) and clouds create some dramatic skies don't they? I love them.

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  36. Oh I never tire of seeing your roos!!! That little fella is a delight! :) You know, if I see 30 birds (of any breed) I get antsy and think of Hitchcock's movie lol, they make me a wee bit nervous...like they know they're getting to me ha ha...your skies are so pretty!

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    1. Rain: I have never seen The Birds - which is probably just as well. We OFTEN have more than thirty birds (of a variety of species) visiting at once.

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  37. I must say I never see those birds and kangaroos in Hawaii. Never. Lol

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    1. gigi-hawaii: You see some wonders I will never see as well. I do occasionally suffer from world-wide bird envy.

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  38. I'm focusing on the positives too, our mental health is just as important as our physical, and those birds would definitely brighten my days!

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    1. You are so right. Mental health is every bit as important (and perhaps more important) than physical health.
      Mine is a big wobbly at the moment and the birds do indeed bring me joy.

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  39. Lovely of you to focus on beauty at this time in the world. Especially beauty in your sky shots.

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    1. John Wiswell: I need to focus on beauty. It is an essential for me anyway, and even more so at the moment. I hope that you are able to self isolate and are safe.

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  40. Here in the UK recently we've had some wonderful blue skies, and it was a joy to see your sky shots too, especially the first one, just love the clouds in the picture too.
    Love the kangaroo too, definitely looks cute.

    My good wishes.

    All the best Jan

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    1. Lowcarb team member ~Jan: A beautiful sky can be an incredible mood lifter can't it. And the kangaroos always make me smile.
      I hope that you and Eddie are well and safe.

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  41. What beautiful photos - it does my heart good to see your clear skies at last! We're welcoming the birds back here after winter - I take my tea outside every morning (as long as it's above zero outside and not windy) and drink it wrapped up in a blanket while I breathe the fresh air. It's wonderful to hear more and more birds joining in with their morning songs. Spring is on its way! :-)

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    1. Diane Henders: It is beyond lovely to have clear skies again. I am very glad to say that autumn is making her presence felt here - which doesn't interrupt the bird song. Like you I like to start my day revelling in the early chorus.

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  42. Beautiful photos. I hope you and your family are well.

    Greetings from London.

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    1. A Cuban in London: Thank you. We are, as I hope it also true of you and your family.

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  43. I always love your pictures of the birds. They are magnificent!

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    1. Starting Over, Accepting Changes - Maybe: Thank you. I do love the birds. We have had five or six native species visit this morning, and three birds have graciously eaten from our hands. Which is a wonderful thing.

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    1. Giancarlo: Thank you. And to you and yours. A good and a healthy week.

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  45. I didn't realize birds were that destructive, I've been watching them for weeks. Love the formations they fly in, or gather on the beach. Like little soldiers. You can always spot the general! :)

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    1. Yolanda Renee: Some birds (and our cockatoos are one of them) are noted for their destructive capability. I spend a LOT of time watching them, and you are right about the general. Often not the biggest bird, but demanding and receiving respect.

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  46. Look at those babies! So sweet!
    The sulfur crested cockatoos are like roses aren't they? Beautiful but with a bite.
    YOU stay safe and healthy.
    A safe distance hug.

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    1. Sandra Cox: Love that analogy - which I hadn't considered but is spot on.
      Non-infectious hugs to you too.

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    2. N-I hugs received and appreciated:)
      The roses came to mind as they are already jabbing at me:)

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    3. Sandra Cox: Roses are like that. They particularly resent being pruned.

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  47. Sunrise and sunset - no better days of the day Sue. Love all the bird images. Hope you are keeping well, please keep safe

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    1. Margaret Birding For Pleasure: Dawn is my favourite but it is a close call. I am ok and hope you are too.

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  48. It makes my heart so happy to see the birds returning!! those fires will have long lasting repercussions, but nature is amazing in her tenacity and willpower!

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    1. Jemi Fraser: It made my heart sing too. I fear we have lost some species but seeing any recovery is wonderful. I hope your book launch week is a resounding success.

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    2. Thanks so very much, Sue!!

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    3. Jemi Fraser: It is my pleasure.

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  49. Beautiful, cheery photos, Sue. Love the birds especially. Our street is called Parakeet Crescent. Wonder what we have screeching every day in the banksia trees outside our fence? We also have 3 black cockatoos who regularly rest in our trees. Nature is awesome, if a bit rowdy at times, LOL.

    Keep safe.

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    1. Denise Covey: Black cockatoos? Colour me envious. We see the yellow-tailed black beauties from time to time (but only when conditions are dire in the preferred habitat).
      Nature is indeed awesome - and on the whole less noisy than we are.
      Stay well, stay safe.

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  50. Thank you for sharing these beautiful skyscapes. And love those cockatoos!

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  51. this is great to stay focused on blessing we have dear EC :)
    i am enchanted by these images specially the sky shots are soul filling !!!
    depends on eyes of one who has such beautiful soul and keen observation for nature's beauty
    thank you for Cockatoo ,they are pretty company indeed ,we had been having green asian parrots each year ,they like to pluck away sunflowers from my garden this time of the year :)
    stay safe and blessed as always my friend!

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    1. baili: Many thanks. I am a beauty addict and so very grateful that there is so much of it about.
      I hope you too can stay safe and well.

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    1. Andrew R. Scott: Kangaroos relax much like cats. And like cats they can move from total relaxation to rapid movement in the blink of an eye.

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  53. Love that sweet kangaroo.

    I also have been spending a lot of time watching the birds and other animals out and about in my yard. I am amazed at the destruction those birds can do. Wow! I am glad that there are young birds being seen too- so important after the fires. Thanks for spreading some beauty around. :) Stay safe!
    ~Jess

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    1. DMS ~Jess: Time spend in the garden bird and critter watching is healing isn't it?
      Cockatoos are noted for their destructive powers. One of my brothers had a shade sail in his yard shredded. They peel the seals around street lamps away and swing on them. And are much loved birds.
      I hope you to can stay safe and well.

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  54. Dear EC, so glad you are sharing bird photographs with us and so relieved that they survived the fires of January and have hatched young. Somehow life goes on, changed but enduring. Take care. Stay safe. Peace.

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    1. Dee: I am filled with hope that more birds/animals have survived. Our losses were huge and at the moment we really don't know the extent of them. And still there is beauty, awe and wonder. For which I am grateful.
      So very grateful.

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  55. I'm so sorry about the losses from fires. Has that situation settled down?

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    1. Sandra Cox: Most of the fires have been out for a while. However this week I learned that at least one tree in the nearest National Park was continuing to burn. It is going to take a very, very long time to assess the damage, repair what we can, and prepare for the next season.

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  56. My goodness, every time I look at the beauty of your pics I'm in awe, and bless you for having such patience to take care of so many birds. I also love your commitment to so many people in need. You're truly wonderful, and I'm sending lots of air hugs your way. RO

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    1. RO: Many thanks. I am a beauty addict and am so grateful that it is everywhere. I get a great deal more from my voluntary work (with people and with birds) than I give.
      Non-contagious elbow hugs to you too. Always.

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  57. The skyscapes are as usual miraculous. And am super glad the birds are nesting and have young with them. You make my world so lovely and hopeful with all that you do. Stay safe and well.

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    1. Nilanjana Bose: What a lovely thing to say. Many, many thanks. The corella younsters are VILELY noisy but we are thrilled to see them. And grateful when they are fed.

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  58. Beautiful skies, beautiful birds. I'd love having those visitors at my place for all their noise but not for destroying the tree. Hope it recovers. And as for the Kangaroo with the floppy ear, he would be welcome too :)

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    1. DeniseinVA: We hope the tree recovers too. Despite the damage they cause (to the tree and to gardens) we welcome the sulphur crested vandals. Isn't that young roo a charmer?

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  59. I'm glad that some of your beautiful native birds have a place to do their things since so many trees have been destroyed in the fires. Maybe the trees will grow bushier with the trimming. It's a blessing that you can feed them from a bucket that you hold in your hands.

    Stay safe and well.
    Hugs, Julia

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    1. Julia: Being able to bucket feed, and in some cases to hand-feed is an incredible privilege. Sadly many of our native trees/forests were completey destroyed, but I do hope that some will recover at least a litte.
      I hope that you and yours can also stay safe and well.

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  60. That youngster melted my heart too! Thanks EC!! Big Hugs!

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    1. Magic Love Crow: That youngster would be fully grown by now - and I hope he is still melting hearts. Huge non-infectious hugs to you too.

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