Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Tuesday, 8 January 2013

Mostly Reading

The skinny portion is visiting his sister so I am home alone.  This means that after the needs of the cats, the birds and the fish have been met I can suit myself.  Luxury.

We are also in the middle of a heat wave, so suiting myself has meant hunkering down and reading.  Also sleeping.

I was given many most excellent books for Christmas and indulged myself shamefully and bought nearly forty more between Christmas and New Year when the book stall at my local shopping centre closed.  How I will miss that book store.  She had a wonderful collection at very affordable prices.  Which she further discounted for me (probably because I bought so many).

When you laugh before you have completed the first paragraph of a book it has to be a good sign.



'It is neither flat nor truly hilly, but gently rolling, its patchwork curves spread and rounded like the breasts of huge, reclining, naked women.  Landscapes are best not likened to men, as occasional pylons can then cause embarrassment.'

And it lived up to its early promise.  Not literature by any means - but fun.

I am currently gobbling two of my Christmas books.



This book was given to me to further indulge my Mitford obsession.  The Duchess of Devonshire is the last surviving Mitford sister and, while I suspect I would have little in common with her (quite apart from the obvious class and wealth divisions) she is fascinating.  Not likeable precisely, but fascinating.

This book is a collection of her occasional writings - mostly vignettes.

'I have reached the stage in life when I wake up earlier and earlier in the mornings.  The wait till breakfast time has forced me to put a kettle and toaster in my room, so I can help myself to their merciful productions whenever I like.  I advise all early wakers who have fallen for this plan to buy a clock with a minute and second hand of immediately recognisable lengths, or you may have my disappointing experience of last week.  Waking at 6 a.m., I made and ate my breakfast, only to discover that the clock's similar-looking hands had played a trick on me, and it was in fact only 12.30 a.m.  Too early even for me, but too late to pretend I hadn't had breakfast.'

I laughed, but did think that a digital clock would solve her problem.

The other Christmas book of the moment is very different.


The author, Fiona Houston, was apparently in the habit of denouncing our modern diets and was prone to ranting about the evils of supermarkets.  She said that people in Scotland were better fed at the end of the eighteenth century than they are now.  She admits herself that she was becoming a bit of a bore on the subject when someone called her bluff and dared her to try living as they did at that time.

So she decided she would.  And that she would do so for a calendar year, to experience 'the realities of all seasons'.  I haven't got very far, but am thoroughly enjoying her diary - complete with some recipes that I will certainly try.


Matters not related to reading:   It appears likely that in early February the skinny one will have the first of two operations which are needed to reverse the ileostomy he currently endures.  This is the 'big one' to repair and re-join his bowel.  If all goes well three months later the ileostomy will be reversed and he will be returned to a bag-free state.  Exactly what he/we went through unsuccessfully last year.  He is gung-ho.  I am worried.  I imagine (but have not been told) that his sister will come to stay with me again.  He is a truly rotten convalescent at the best of times and I am so not looking forward to this (while understanding completely why he has agreed to the surgeries).

I have just started a new medication to reduce the pain which has been waking me up shrieking at night for longer than I care to remember.  So far on the pain front it has made a HUGE difference (and about time too).  The trade-off is low level nausea (most of the time) and headaches (ditto).  So far it is worth it - but I am very glad to have my home alone time to come to terms with it.  I also intend to get my relaxation in while I can to prepare me for the ugly months to come.

While he is in hospital and I have a house-guest I will be very much a fly-in, fly-out blogger.  And I know from my experiences last year how much I will miss you all.


112 comments:

  1. Now, having scribbled a couple of those titles to look for...I am pleased that the new meds seem to be helping, albeit somewhat back-handedly.I'm sure you'll make minor personal adjustments to accommodate things.
    The mixture as before - if you want to vent, shriek,sob, you know how to reach me.
    Keep that water bucket handy - just heard the weather forecast for your district.

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    1. dinahmow: Fires (grass) in the next suburb. High wind. Worrying time. And thank you for the venting offer - I may well take you up on it.

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  2. That's good news that your pain medication is giving you some real help. What with the forthcoming surgery your year does not sound easy or pleasant for either/both of you. I hope all goes well.
    Your reading sounds great. I came across the letters of the Mitford who went to America, but refrained from buying it (it was very large) but now feel rather regretful. Never mind! Like you I have plenty to read and my major problem is not ignoring the claims of the house enough to devote large chunks of time to reading. The other problem is my start and stop approach and being tool impatient, wanting to dip into the next delight.

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    1. persiflage: I usually have at least two books on the go at once so that I can dip. And sometimes more. It is very hard to resist. For what it is worth, I found Jessica Mitford the least engaging in letter form. Too earnest perhaps? Fingers crossed that this year the surgery goes as it should. If it does, he is off overseas again. China perhaps, or South America. Travelling solo...

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  3. you are such a delightful companion! Glad you have (after the creatures :) only thyself to cater to. And reading at hand? LUXE indeed.

    Do hope medical procedures proceed as magic. Don't want to miss your worthy comments for TOO long!

    Aloha
    from Waikiki,
    Comfort Spiral
    ~ > < } } ( ° >
    > < } } ( ° >
    > < 3 3 3 ( ' >

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    1. Cloudia: Thank you so much. I will be here for a little while yet...

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  4. The lady on the cover of the Deborah Mitford book reminds me of the Queen. Fingers crossed SP's operation works out ok.

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    1. Windsmoke: Deborah Mitford is friends with the Queen, with Prince Charles, and was so intimate with the Queen Mother that she even gave her the knickname 'Cake' (because of her fondness for it I think). And thankyou for your wishes for the skinny one. Hopefully, this time.

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  5. Changing clocks would not help because I have one and still can't see it.

    Husbands and sickness. What's up with that? Seriously. At any rate I hope everything goes better than expected. Having a bag is a drag.

    Your medication working is great news!

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    1. Birdie: The skinny portion has a clock which if you clap tells you the time. It sends me bonkers.
      My medication reducing the pain is wonderful. I am annoyed at how long it took though.
      After the surgical year from hell last year, hopefully this time things go to plan.

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  6. Thank goodness you are getting some quality time to yourself right now....you need to store up the healing for the trials and tribulations to come. Hope everything goes well.

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    1. mybabyjohn/Delores: This is my time, and I am revelling in it. I am not even certain how long I have - another week or so.

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  7. I'm glad the meds are helping. Looks like February will be a busy month for you. I hope it will at least be cooler by then.

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    1. Karen: February is often our hottest month (shudder) but I expect I will be too busy to notice (or something like that). And yes, it is making a very big difference not being woken by pain up to eight or nine times a night. I am still woken once or twice, but the pain is nothing like as severe even when it does still wake me. A very big win indeed.

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  8. some interesting reads there EC. will make note of them.

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    1. librarygirl: I will be interested to hear what you think of them.

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  9. I too find the first paragraph of a book extremely important, whether it be a mystery, comedy or whatever.
    I have been thinking of you in the extreme heat you are experiencing over there (my 90 year old ex sister-in-law lives in your town with her 92 y.o hubby) and I hope you are managing to keep cool, all of you. Reading is a great way to take your mind of what is happening outside.
    I love to read but if I read in the daytime I get tired and yet I can go to bed quite late and then read for an hour or more. Your selection of books is quite fascinating.
    Good, if somewhat worrisome. news about the ops facing your other half and one can only hope that all will go well.

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    1. Mimsie: Reading is my drug of choice, and I can (and do) read at almost anytime.
      All we can do is hope that this time the surgery is successful - hopefully they have learnt from last year's mistakes.

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  10. What bliss to be able to READ uninterrupted! That first book sounds just hilarious.

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  11. Oh, and so sorry to hear the smaller portion must go back to hospital and so glad that your pain is easing...

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    1. ladyfi: That Awkward Age certainly did have its moments. Quite a lot of them. We knew that SP would have to return to hospital, and are now hoping that these two surgeries will be the end of it. Less pain? Bliss.

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  12. Having just been through six months or so of a REALLY trying time around one of Mr A's illnesses (think plumbing), I feel your pain with regard to the SP. Well no, obviously I don't actually feel your pain, but I do have great empathy for you. I like nothing more than having the house to myself. Alone. No-one else. preferably for an extended period of time... And then I can read!!!

    Hope the heat isn't too unbearable, and that the side-effects of the medication diminish.
    Arohanui.

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    1. Alexia: Home alone is wonderful. Demanding as the cats are, they pale into insignificance beside an unwell SP. And I don't like to be interrupted while reading. Selfish? Perhaps.
      The heat is vile - but gives me another excuse for hunkering down with my books.

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  13. I am so glad that the meds are helping! Hopefully the side affects will even out soon. Store up the benefits of quiet time. It sounds like you will be on the merry-go-round again soon. I hope the heat breaks soon. Doesn't it seem like the weather (no matter where you live) gets weirder and weirder each year. Prayers to keep the fire away sent for you.

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    1. Teresa: Thank you. There are small grass fires nearby, but so far they seem to be under control. You are right about the weather - not only weird, just plain unpleasant.
      I am indeed storing my quiet time before the medical mayhem starts again, and hopefully the nausea and headaches will have worn off by then too.

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  14. Anything at all that reduces pain is a good thing and I'm glad to hear your new meds are working. I hope everything goes very well next February, in the meantime, read as many books as you can. I've written down those titles, they look interesting.

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    1. River: Thank you. I am reading, reading, reading. It is bliss.

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  15. I used to savor that same thing when my now ex-husband was traveling for business - just doing whatever you want. Perfect. (And it's hard to imagine a heat wave when it's so cold over here.)

    If I was the Duchess of Devonshire, I would eat a second breakfast anyway. :)

    I'm so glad the medication is working - and I can only imagine how hard it is with a difficult convalescent. Perfect that you can shore yourself up now.

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    1. Lynn: The cooler (cold) temperatures on your side of the world are filling me with longing. It will come. And yes, this time to myself, for myself is very valuable indeed.

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  16. I think I might enjoy a read of the Duchess book. I have a bit of a Duchess of Devonshire (if not a Mitford) obsession.

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    1. Dave King: For someone who was known in the family as Dumb Debo or Nine (for her reputed mental age), the Duchess of Devonshire is a very astute businesswomen (not to say inspirational) and very, very far from stupid.

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  17. This alone time is perfectly timed, I think. It sounds delightful, and I'm happy you are enjoying it. As for second breakfasts, I find them wonderful, Duchess or not.

    Don't think about what's coming up, just be in the now. The future comes quicker than we like, so don't worry about it until it arrives.

    Happy reading! Peace...

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    1. Linda: I thrive on time alone, and usually don't get anything like enough of it. This interlude is, despite the vile temperatures, wonderful.

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  18. Oh how wonderful time alone is! I think it is something we all need but rarely admit because we do not want to hurt other's feelings. Just having a good book as a companion is a joy in life.

    Glad your new medication is working for you. I have found out that every pill I take has a side effect so I am prescribed another pill to get rid of the side effect, and so on, and so on, and so on. Four years ago I was on 11 medications but am now down to four. I have learned to live without them .

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    1. Starting Over, Accepting Changes - Maybe: Alone with a book is bliss.
      It is wonderful to be only woken by pain every second night or so. The nausea and the headaches are quite acceptable trade-offs. Onto a soap box now. Some years ago it was pointed out to me that there are no side effects. They are all effects, just some of them we want more than others. Which made sense, and strangely makes the 'other effects' easier for me to cope with.

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  19. Oh, a book review! I will take a look at that first one, as it had me smiling too. And I was put in mind of Barbara Kingsolver's Animal Vegetable Miracle when I saw the last one, living in the eighteenth century. I'll check it out, too. I am so glad to hear that the pain meds are working. I suffer from low level nausea occasionally, too. If you find anything that helps with that, be sure to mention it.

    And I understand your concerns about the upcoming surgeries and houseguest. You have described both quite well in previous posts! :-)

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    1. DJan: I love Animal, Vegetable, Miracle. And gave it to several of my friends as well. Not only did Fiona Houston eat the diet of people in 18th Century Scotland, she lived the life as well (mostly). No electricity, no car, no email. Walking everywhere, dressed as she would have been ... She didn't even cheat (much).

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  20. The children went back to school today so I'm wallowing in lonesome bliss! O how wonderful.
    So pleased to hear that your pain meds are working, that must make a big difference to your nights.
    Fingers, toes and everything else crossed here for successful, uncomplicated surgery for the SP this year.
    Hey ho, time's nearly up, back to school again (already!)
    Thinking often of you both x

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    1. bugerlugs63: 'Lonesome bliss' sums it up beautifully. My nights are soooo much better now. And yes, fingers, toes etc crossed for his surgery. Thank you for your good thoughts.

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  21. I heard about your heat wave over there and the bush fires going on. We call them "brush fires" -- for whatever reason. Same thing. Anyway, please keep safe. I'm glad you are enthralled with the book - sounds wonderful. And the woman who was against supermarket type of food and her challenge to take on the diet from years ago - that totally reminds me of the Paleo diet. The "caveman diet" as some would call it where it's "clean food". I tried it the best I could but fell weak to the evil carb. o_O

    Anyway, hang in there and I hope everyone convalesces (especially you my dear!) and that your pain in next to zero. I have been experiencing severe pain in every. single. joint. and portion of my body for the past few months now. I am going for blood work to see if it is fibromyalgia or even *gasp* lyme disease. It's debilitating and usually occurs at night. I'm literally SCREAMING and crying in pain. No pain reliever can help it either. ANYWAY, my prayers for you!

    Be well ~

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    1. Deb: I am so sorry to hear about your pain. I understand totally about waking shrieking, crying and the no relief game. It sucks. Badly. I really, really hope that a cause and relief is found for your pain very soon.

      As I said to DJan, Fiona Houston lived the life as well as ate the diet. There were carbohydrates (though less of course) but no packets, no bottles, no food travelling many miles. It would have been a very challenging experience - and I am enjoying reading about it. (Much more than I would have enjoyed the experience.)

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    2. Thank you! Exercising helps it a lot, as well as vitamin D supplements since we're experiencing winter here. Less light.

      Sounds like this woman lived on organic/natural foods instead of processed, which is always a healthier option. More expensive but probably worth it!!

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    3. Deb: I am glad you have found things which help - at least a little.
      Not only was it organic/natural - it was what she could grow and/or find for the most part. Also what she could make - including rush lights. No electricity. No use of the car. And surprisingly little cheating.

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  22. It was nice to meet you today at Laura Eno's blog. Take care and enjoy your alone time.

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    1. Carol Kilgore: Welcome and thank you. I was so impressed at how you handled Mistress Snark.

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  23. Oh boy. Your pain sounds horrible, but I'm glad that the medication helps you even though it has some unpleasant side effects. I hope that the coming months won't be as bad, although I am sure that this is wishful thinking. Keep on reading if you can. If all this means the skinny one will be so much better eventually, it probably is worth it. All the best!

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    1. Carola Bartz: The pain was vile. It had been with me for years and woke me every night. Up to eight or nine times. It is wonderful to be only woken occasionally, and the pain is much less severe when it does wake me. A win.
      We will get through the next three or four months - it is just very unlikely to be a fun time. And the smaller portion is very, very good at complications.

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  24. Forty books? My goodness.

    Other issues sound rather grim. Good wishes for them all.

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    1. Don QuiScottie: The books are my survival mechanism. I hope they work...

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  25. Sleep, Read, Repeat! Glorious! Here's hoping that all goes well with the surgeries - and the houseguest - and that by February you are fully adjusted to the new medication. Happy New Year! Fingers are crossed that it goes well for you!

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    1. daisyfae: Thank you. The sleep, read, repeat cure has been very, very beneficial. I feel closer to sane than I have in a long time (and much less pain helps there too). And a Happy New Year to you and Studley too.

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  26. And we shall miss you too. I wish you all the best over the coming days and months.

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    1. Ron Dudley: Thank you. I will be around still for the next fortnight or so I think.

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  27. you make me want to cuddle up with a good book
    and a cup of hot tea
    and indulge, too, for a long afternoon of sleepy joy:)
    thanks for the sweet inspire,
    Jennifer

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    1. Jennifer Richardson: I hope you can get that afternoon with a book and a cup of tea (or several of each).

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  28. Thanks for giving us a sample of your reading list; the books you have on your nightstand (which is where I imagine them, probably because that's where I have a huge, unwieldy stack) sound delightful!

    Wishing you the best of luck with your new meds; also with the skinny one (haha, that made me laugh) and surgery. Goodness, you deserve some quiet book time to be sure.

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    1. Ms. CrankyPants: (goodness how I relate to your name). Thank you. My books are all over the house - where-ever I happen to be reading them. And the unwieldy piles are also all over the house.

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  29. I know that you are utilising positive distractions during some very trying times in your personal lives. I know a bit of humour from the reading, the encouraging results from your medication, bodes well for better times ahead for you and I hope for your loved one. May you soon have some refreshing cooler weather.

    In kindness,

    Gary

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    1. klahanie: Thank you so much. I will do whatever it takes to get though this...

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  30. My first time here. I enjoyed reading your book review. On my current post I list the books I read this year as I also like to read a lot. Yesterday I placed Wait for Me by Deborah Mitford on reserve at my Library and am looking forward to reading it. It is good that you found new medication to help you.

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    1. Vagabonde: Welcome and thank you. I really, really liked 'Wait for Me' - I hope your library can get it soon.

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  31. I would like to know how the Garden Cottage Diaries goes. Reminds me of a BBC show we watch - The Supersizers. It's interesting, although I hate knowing about all the poor animals that were eaten in such extravagant quantities.

    Oh, my heart goes out to you for the pain that you've endured. I hope the new meds will continue to give you relief.
    Would peppermint or a peppermint/chamomile blend tea help you with the nausea?
    And a natural herbal rub/ointment I know could help with the headaches.

    I am hoping your husband's surgery is successful. Hopefully having the procedure in the early-mid part of the year will mean a more comfortable, peaceful remainder of the year, and beyond - for both of you.

    Wishing you all the very best :)

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    1. Vicki: I am loving the Garden Cottage Diaries. She really put her money where her mouth was. A year with no electricity in a place as cold as Scotland would have been very challenging indeed. Her food sounded really good though (with the exception of the time she talks about eating road kill).
      At the moment, green tea with lemon seems to help the nausea - and I am doing my best to ignore the headaches. They are much, much less painful that the spasms which had been waking me for so long.
      Thank you so much for your good wishes - for me, and for the smaller portion.

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  32. For those who enjoy some solitude but rarely have it, time alone is wonderful. Wring everything from it that you can :)

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  33. That pylons thing? Something terribly similar shows up in the book I'm editing right now...

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    1. John Wiswell: You know I want to know more don't you?

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  34. I wish you all the very best for you, your pain relief (and easing of the side effects) and the upcoming challenges for your other half. We, your blog readers and friends, will be here for you whenever you want us. :)

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  35. "Landscapes are best not likened to men, as occasional pylons can then cause embarrassment." - I have a phobia of pylons, so this makes me laugh twice as much hahahaha ...so glad you have this time to yourself, well desreved , wallow in the words my dear and let your mind go xx

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    1. All Consuming: It is no problem letting my mind go - it is the getting it back that bothers me.

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  36. Ah the house to yourself, just wonderful, that first book look intriguing purely because of the cover and I think Fiona may be on to something about the food of supermarkets.

    I am hoping the skinny one will have a successful operation and come through with flying colors as bag free I can only imagine that would be just super, wishing the best in that regard.

    My Gary is looking forward to a day without me today. Ha. I do the same when he is gone. Ah the time to ourselves is precious and just as precious together.

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    1. Linda Starr: Thank you for your good wishes. Despite being told not to judge a book by its cover (literally and metaphorically) I think most of us do. And, if our first judgements are not set in stone I don't think it is a problem.

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  37. Glad you get osme time for yourself. That will be hard, the surgery thing again. I hope it won't be as hard as the last.

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    1. Strayer: The time alone was been wonderful. I also hope, with everything crossed, that the surgery this year goes MUCH better.

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  38. My heart breaks for you and all that you endure. You are a woman of extraordinary courage that deals with so much stress which causes pain levels to soar.

    I remain your blogger friend; thru thick and thin ~:)

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    1. Pam:): Thank you. I am not certain that courage is the right word though - I think courage implies a choice. Resignation? Pragamitism? Whichever, I am certainly hoping for better things this time round.

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  39. All good wishes to you and yours for this new year. I am sorry for what you have to face, and hope you can do it all with your usual wit and strength. I'm glad you have so many good books to support you. Take care of yourself as well as of others.

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  40. I wish I could do more for you than send you this virtual hug :)

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    1. DeniseinVA: Cyber hugs never go astray, and are always welcome. Thank you.

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  41. I have only the best wishes for the health of both you and your thinner portion.

    And the book on the Duchess? She sounds fascinating.

    Pearl

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    1. Pearl: Thank you. And the Duchess continues to delight me.

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  42. An interesting collection, I do so adore truly funny books occasionally. Life is miserable enough at the best of times. Sorry to hear that health is still a big problem for both of you but glad to hear that medication is lessening the pain.
    Best of luck! And keep reading.

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    1. Friko: Thank you. I will most certainly keep reading. So many books, so little time...

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  43. I have been thinking so much about you, lately with all the fires going on...and now this...I'll keep thinking of you and do not even worry about fly in and out blogging...

    Be safe and thank you so much for this very interesting book collection you have :-)

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    1. farawayinthesunshine: Thank you. The weather is vile, but I am hoping (so much) that the fires will be controlled soon. There are, unlike the day before yesterday, none near me at the moment, but so many people must be watching the sky anxiously that I feel a little guilty for being thankful for being safe.
      The skinny portion and I will get through this. It won't be fun - but we will survive.

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    2. I keep thinking of you, I always have this sentence in my head when the going gets tough...This too shall pass xo

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    3. farawayinthesunshine: Thank you - it will.

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  44. Today is gray overhead with occasional showers falling from the heavens above, but the eternal optimist in me went out and played in the rain anyway. I captured a bird taking a rain-bath atop a tree in my backyard.

    My wish for you and SP is that all your tomorrows be Healthy and Happy ones.

    Hugs and smiles across the miles :)

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    1. Pam:): Thank you. I am looking forward to seeing the photo of the bird at his abulutions.

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  45. Somehow I missed this, which means I have to get in back of a very long line. :)

    I hope you're still reading and relaxing and I'll be keeping you both in my thoughts for February.

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    1. Laura Eno: Still reading (always reading), and some relaxation too. Thank you for your February wishes.

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  46. The two books you have listed look great. I need to start a list somewhere, of everything you have recommended... Although the fact that the book shop closed is VERY UPSETTING. ARGH. What a shame. We still have one, down from three ten years ago, and it just got smaller... To make room for some big-box pier one imports or something like that. Double ARGH. I like peace and quiet and it is SO NICE to have the house to yourself sometimes... other people GET IN THE WAY. I love the saying that Pam above said: Hugs and smiles across the miles. I second that!!! xoxo

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    1. Nicky HW: The book stall was a snare and a temptation - and I gave in often. I will miss her, but my self-indulgent purchases mean I have reading for many months... Home alone has a great deal of charm. Thank you for echoing Pam.

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  47. I adore the duchess ...chatsworth house is one of my very favourite places......although she does not live there anymore...she's on the estate itself x

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    1. John Gray: Her description of part of her new home filled me with a longing to see it.
      '...the builders removed some plaster fron an internal wall to find it lined with reeds, the flowers still attached to the ends of the stalks. They have put a glass panel so you can see this pretty and practical kind of insulation.' Doesn't that sound delightful!

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    2. I HAVE a friend who knows here, and he speaks so fondly of the old gal...she is apparently really down to earth and funny

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    3. John Gray: That is really lovely to hear.

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  48. Hi

    Great photos, lovely blog. I am well impressed to see that you seem to respond to every one of your very large number of comments!
    By the way, I was in Sydney, Cairns and Melbourne last month and I thought it was hot then (max 39 at Philip Island) but it seems to be getting much hotter now. I hope you are coping OK.
    Click here for Bazza’s Blog ‘To Discover Ice’

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    1. Bazza: Welcome and thank you. I do try and respond to everyone - if they can take the time and trouble to comment it seems only fair to reply. It does seem to be getting hotter - and I am hanging in there.

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  49. PS: I was, of course, talking about the photos in the previous post!

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    1. Bazza: Photos - not scanned images. Thank you.

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  50. The Cover of that first book makes me want to toddle along that path, turn thelatch on that door and curl up in that cozy room from which that warm, inviting light shines---with the book, of course! The Mitfords....Are on my book pile, but didn't catch the first time---will have to have another go!
    Meanwhile I ordered copies of "Walter" for my grandsons----will let you know how they like him....

    So sorry about all the medical problems and upcoming surgery for your Skinny Portion. Hope everything has the best possible outcome for both of you....Hugs from Florida!

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    1. Molly: Thank you for your good wishes. The Mary Selby book was indeed one to snuggle up with - a true cosy. I am addicted to the Mitfords and have got to the stage that if I learned that they had designed and written food labels I would read them too.
      I hope your grandsons do like Walter.

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  51. I'm sorry, somehow I missed this post - I am sorry about the medication side effects, but so happy that it helps with that pain, which sounded unbearable. I am a big fan of medicinal science when necessary :)

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    1. Riot Kitty: Sometimes medical science is truly wonderful. It sucks that it is necessary though.

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  52. What amazing books!

    Glad your pain is down a notch or two--and sorry to hear that you and yours have so much ahead of you. Will be watching for you. Can I send you anything from So. California?

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    1. Susan Kane: Thank you so much. We have everything we need - and my to-read pile is simply HUGE. I really appreciate your (and everyone else's) good wishes.

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  53. I would love to read the second one, sounds like a very interesting book. Reading is such a great pleasure. Glad your meds are working

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    1. Zena: Thank you so much - it was a truly fascinating book, and one I will be able to reread. And yes, reading is bliss.

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  54. good on you for treating yourself to all those books! and i have to admit i am superenvious of everyone who doesn't exerience a longterm loss of reading mojo. your books sound fab! i enjoyed a biography about the mitford sisters years ago, written by a swedish journalist, probably not translated to english otherwise i'd recommend it.

    i find (as you've probably noticed) that writing about your worries, aches, pains and such in blog do help to ease them a bit. get the load off, give you different perspectives. and now and then good advice and a sympathetic comment. good stuff.

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