Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Sunday, 6 October 2013

Sunday Selections #140


Sunday Selections was originally brought to us by Kim, of Frogpondsrock, as an ongoing meme where participants could post previously unused photos languishing in their files. 

The meme is now continued by River at Drifting through life.  The rules are so simple as to be almost non-existent.  Post some photos under the title Sunday Selections and link back to River.

Like River, I generally run with a theme.   This week I am featuring birds that I don't often show you.  You will probably need to click and embiggen because the first bird of the week is very, very small. 

The Silvereyes are tiny, quick moving birds which are hard to capture.  The lure of an apple kept them still enough (just) to fire off a few quick shots.  In the second shot you can see where its very original and imaginative name comes from.




 The next bird is a Rainbow Lorikeet.  They are quite common in coastal areas of Northern and Eastern Australia but we, being a distance from the coast, rarely see them.  And welcome them when we do.  This pair appeared just after six one morning last week.






124 comments:

  1. You have the most wonderful birds.

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  2. The Silvereyes are cute little birds, with quite an appetitie by the looks of that apple! Love the Rainbows~

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    1. Karen: The silvereyes don't get to the apple until rather a lot of other birds have been. But they do get there... The Rainbows are stunning aren't they? Next time I hope to get better photos.

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  3. We've got little Silvereye's darting around our garden too. Such delightful little birds. And man, can they move!

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    1. Wendy: Can't they? They make superman look slow.

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  4. Can I make a plea for any one who'd like to feed the birds? Please NEVER feed honey. It is not a natural food. Sugar water is better for them and reduces the risk of bee disease.
    But best of all is a bird bath of clean water. It';s like a ringside seat at a circus!
    Up here, sunbirds seem to take the place of the silver eyes.

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    1. dinahmow: Thank you. No honey here. Ever. I don't feed them bread either. And really want a bird bath - out of cat range. Our cats and all the others in the neighbourhood.

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    2. It's why we don't have one here, though some neighbours do. Sometimes, I just hook a hose high in a tree, sit back with a glass of something...therapy!

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    3. dinahmow: Oh decidedly therapy. I love the way that birds enjoy a bath. And still smile remembering galahs hanging upside down on telephone wires holding their wings out to 'wash their underarms' in a shower.

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  5. Really nice EC. Hope you are not suffering with your loss of 1 hour overnight.

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    1. Carol in Cairns: I am an early bird so it doesn't really bother me - from that perspective anyway. I think it starts too soon and goes on for too long though.

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  6. I've had so much fun with the silly feeder I bought in the spring I'm looking into some serious stations for the winter.

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    1. Joanne Noragon: Be prepared to spend a LOT of time watching them.

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  7. The silvereyes have perfect camouflage! Love the lorikeets.

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    1. Susan Kane: I suspect as such a tiny bird they need the camoflague. Unless the bold colours on the Rainbow Lorikeets.

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  8. Love these birds! You have such colorful birds there.

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    1. Kathleen Cassen Mickelson: We love them too. All of them.

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  9. I do so love looking at colourful birds. Thank you and time for an apple :)

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    1. klahanie: The birds prefer their apples green. Not certain why, but it is a very decided preference. Enjoy yours. And have a wonderful weekend.

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  10. Your birds are simply amazing. You got some good shots, EC. And I hope you are doing well and fully recovered from all your excursions. :-)

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    1. DJan: Aren't they a treat? And as I said next time the lorikeets appear I want to do better. Much better.
      Still tired, still sore, but getting there.

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  11. You have to have the most beautiful birds around! I saw a program the other day on PBS about parrots and budgies. I never saw a flock of budgies! So cool looking! I had one for 8 years. So very long ago. They are such little characters!

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    1. Teresa: In one of the areas we lived in, we would see flocks of up to a hundred budgies. Magic.

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  12. Great photos EC. Well done capturing the tiny, quick Silvereye.

    I love little Silvereyes! And painted them on natural wood for the tourist shops.
    We used to have a few apricot, plums and mulberry trees, long ago. And, when the fruit was almost ripe, the Silveryes would move in for the feast and decimate.
    I hated netting because they would get caught - even if there was a big gap underneath to exit.
    So, no nets. I shared the fruit with them, and as long as I picked the least damaged, everyone (human and bird), was happy.
    They have a particular little high pitched "call". I always knew when they were around.

    And those chirpy, cheeky rainbows - such characters. They're always in pairs when they visit.
    If we leave our back door open for too long, they've been known to come inside. Along with the big white cockies and the rosellas. We need to be mindful to keep the door closed.
    Rescuing parrots with bolt-cutter like beaks is NOT fun.
    I've done my fare share last year. Gently caught them and taken them outside, unharmed - which is more than I can say for me in return. I've been bitten for my trouble, when I wasn't quick enough to keep fingers out of the way, haha.

    I have to say, out of all of them, the cheeky Rainbows have the most painful bite. Even when a big Sulpher bit through from one side of my thumb to the other, it wasn't as painful as the pincer grip of a Rainbow.

    But, I LOVE them all the same. Just keep that door closed!!

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    1. instead of catching them and getting bitten could you instead leave a trail of birdseed for them to follow back out the door?

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    2. Vicki: It took me a while to learn to love the silvereyes. When I was growing up we had a fig tree. Which they loved. They would hollow out the fruit which would fall to the ground and rot. It was my job to clean up the half-eaten decomposing fruit. And I still cannot face figs.
      And I here you on the ingratitude of rescued animals. It was a mouse that savaged me last. And I am sure the bite went to the bone. And birds inside seem to lose all sense (and all control). Cockatoos go into one of my brother's house. They open the sliding door and help themselves to the bird seed which is kept in the sun room. Not popular.

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    3. River: They might follow the birdseed trail, but I don't it. They seem to get very confused when they come inside. Confused and frightened.

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    4. River, the birdseed isn't an option at all. They find themselves at the other end of the house by the large windows, behind the couch and panic to get out. So, seed won't help as EC says, they become way too confused and frightened, and who wants to eat in that state? :)
      As our windows are the wind out style, with very little gap for a bird to navigate through, the only thing to do is to catch them and release them safely outside - I've become quite good at it actually, sore fingers aside :)
      And, the door stays closed these days.

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    5. Vicki: I have captured a bird or two inside the house myself. I use a tea-towel often...

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    6. Lovely volley of replies here EC. I'm willing to have a go at catching almost anything that comes inside (though maybe not a snake... they get shepherded out) but I draw the line at handling the big black cockatoos. They have a seriously powerful beak and I can imagine losing a thumb or finger after watching them snap off quite sturdy branches.

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    7. Carol: It is lovely isn't it? I do love the people who visit me here. And snakes I am not good at. Really not good at. I give them as wide a berth as I can manage.

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  13. We have many wonderful birds in our yard but none as pretty as you have.

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    1. Starting Over, Accepting Changes - Maybe: I would be very, very happy to see many of your birds too.

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  14. Your post is an ecstasy of birds!!!!!!



    ALOHA from Honolulu
    Comfort Spiral
    =^..^= <3


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    1. Cloudia: And they fill me with ecstacy.

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  15. Great shots EC, those Rainbow Lorikeets are now in plaque proportions in Perth from an escape from an aviary many many years ago. They are gorgeous but so loud as they fly in flocks and perch in trees. Apparently they threaten some of our native Western Australian bird wildlife with competition for nesting space. Just love their glorious colours though.

    I remember little silver eye eating the grapes on our grapevine when I was growing up. We occasionally see them in our yard as well.

    Thanks for sharing with us. I love your photos.

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    1. Kakka: Thank you. I had heard that the Rainbow Lorikeets had colonised Perth. Careless humans have a lot to answer for don't they?
      And yes, the silvereyes LOVE fruit. And are faster finding ripe fruit than people. Much faster.

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  16. I haven't seen many rainbow lorikeets around here for a while, so it's nice to see them at your place. I heard crows quite close early this morning so summer is definitely on the way. I love the little silvereye, we don't get them here.

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    1. River: We almost never get the rainbow lorikeets. I am not sure whether this pair have escaped, or were out of their territory. I hope the latter.
      Silvereyes are charming - if you don't have fruit trees.

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  17. That little fellow certainly did do a good job on that apple!

    My family of wood ducks, Mum, Dad and the four kids, have just wandered by during their afternoon graze; and all my meat-eating feathered friends have just been feasting on the meat scraps from my two cats' dinner that I've just cut up.

    There's a whole world of birds going on out there at the side of my cabin at the moment.

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    1. Lee: And isn't it a joy? Four duckling says Mr and Mrs Duck are good parents.

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  18. These are gorgeous photos, and now I am also going to let you in on one of the reasons I dislike birds, just so you don't think it's because I'm simply a grump.

    When I was dating my ex, we thought it would be fun to go to the zoo. He went out of his way to insist that we go to the lorakeet cage and feed them apple juice. Mind you, this costs extra. Guess they really liked the juice, because the lorakeets peed all over me. My ex didn't even notice, being so distracted by the gorgeous birds. Whilst they peed on me, he said, "Isn't this great?!!" And I said, "Absolutely not!"

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    1. Riot Kitty: Eeeuw. And eeeuw again. Nope, being peed on by anything does not make for a 'great' afternoon. I once put a turtle in the pocket of my cargo pants while I moved it off a busy road. It peed buckets. More than I thought possible. And I was condemned to spend the afternoon in peed upon trousers. Not fun.
      I promise that none of the birds I show you will EVER piddle on you.

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    2. Please note the LOL was for EC's last line; Riot Kitty - possibly we get a glimmer of why that fellow is your ex :)

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    3. jenny_o: Deservedly and unregrettably ex from the sound of it...

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  19. HI EC Such lovely pretty birds in your garden.

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    1. Margaret Adamson: There are. Lucky, lucky, lucky.

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  20. Oh how beautiful. I only ever see really colourful birds while on holiday !

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    1. BadPenny: I like the little brown jobs as well as the colourful ones. Charm in camoflague.

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  21. Have you ever thought of starting up a very, very expensive B&B. I would come!

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    1. Birdie: And you would be welcome. Without the very, very expensive charges.

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  22. When I was a child I was trapped in a tiny room with a sparrow that had managed to squeeze through the small window near the ceiling. I'm not sure who was most distressed, it or I, but we made one hell of a racket between us until Pa came and set it free. Poor thing. Not me the bird. Love the silver eyes, I'm a fan of the smaller birds for the most part, but the colourful Lorikeets do flood me with colour which is nice.

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    1. All Consuming: I can picture it now - and can well understand the distress on both parts...

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  23. Am sitting with my coffee next to an open window, reading your blog, and watching a cute little house finch at my feeder and a chipmunk we've named Cheeky underneath, hoovering up the fallen seeds. It's such a lovely, relaxing thing, watching the activity at the feeders. And it's very cool to see the birds you have!

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    1. Ms. CrankyPants: Lovely, relaxing - and addictive.

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    2. Cranky, I hope you're supplementing Cheeky's take with some nice organic seeds and nuts. Only the best for the chipmunks!

      EC, it always seems that by the time I get here dozens have already chimed in, but I do want to add my little bit of admiration. I love your photos. And your birds. Always a nice little island of pleasure in the day.

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    3. Paper Chipmunk (aka Ellen): I am glad to see you here - always. And love the thought of providing a bit of pleasure in your all too often fraught and ugly days.

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  24. We used to see loads of silvereyes in our garden years ago but I've not seen any for ages and have no idea why that is.
    Kakka is so right when she says the lorikeets are beautiful but a pest in Perth particularly in dislodging some of our endemic species which is a shame. They do seem to breed quite prolifically too. I love birds of all types and it's such a shame that some can become a nuisance.
    Loved the photos though.

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    1. Mimsie: Thank you. And yes, I hear you about the 'nuisance' birds. And it is almost always our fault.

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  25. OOOoo, those colorful birds are heavenly.

    Just. Like. You, S. Xx

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    1. My Inner Chick: The birds are a delight. Me? Not always.

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  26. We had such a menagerie of birds we fed in Indiana. We were looking forward to having even more in Florida. What a shock. We only have crows here.

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    1. lotta joy: We do get a lot of birds here - but the crows rarely come to visit. And I welcome when they do - such intelligent birds.

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  27. The silvereye is so cute!! I guess it is hard to photograph and I am glad that you were able to capture it. I wish we had lorikeets here, that would be so much fun to see them at the bird feeders.

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    1. Carola Bartz: The silvereyes are small, move fast and have an erratic flight path as well. Only food keeps them still - and that not for long. We don't often get the lorikeets - but we do get rosellas and other coloured birds. So very lucky.

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    1. Andrew Maclaren-Scott: They all amaze me. In my atheistic way I think birds are miracles.

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  29. Those little silvereyes are so adorable! I had a little SQUEEE here admiring their cuteness! :)

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    1. Cathy Oliffe-Webster: Aren't they. And since I don't have a fig tree for them to feast on, I love them too.

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  30. Birds are just my very favourite thing. These are beautiful. I've never seen a silvereye before! I will look out for them now.

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    1. Jackie K: Birds are one of my most favourite things too.

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  31. Lovely that Silvereyes and Rainbows come to your garden EC. I've never seen Silvereyes eating apples but they make short work of our figs and I'm pretty sure they do something to the apricot blossoms that means we get no fruit haha, they're welcome! I've been catching up with your other beautiful images too, loved seeing so many cheerful flowers :)

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    1. Kim: The silvereyes are here often (yay) and the rainbow lorikeets a couple of times a year. And next time I hope to get a much better photo.

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  32. Of all the birds in Australia the Rainbow Lorikeets touch me the most, they bring back such lovely memories of time spent along the coast in NSW. Thanks for sharing them EC

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    1. Mia McPherson: They are rare visitors here - but welcome. And I am glad to bring back happy memories for you. Sometime I would love to hear about your time in Oz.

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  33. Silver eyes indeed! And the colorful lorikeet - so beautiful. It must be amazing to see these birds just flying around.

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  34. oh WOW....those photos made me stop and catch my breath
    for just a moment
    because it's just so BEAUTIFUL and precious and green!
    Thanks for giving my heart a happy little twinkle:)
    -Jennifer

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    1. Jennifer Richardson: I am so glad to be able to bring a twinkle to you.

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  35. You always have the most delightful visitors!

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    1. ladyfi: And they are very, very welcome.

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  36. At first I didn't see the Silvereyes - like someone else already noted, their camouflage is perfect!

    You mentioned that you like crows - I do too. They are much maligned, in my opinion. They have been proven to be very smart and can fashion simple tools to help them get food, and also can learn people's faces and teach their offspring who to avoid - without the people being present, as I recall from a TV documentary. They also keep their young with them for a long time and have a strong family unit. Amazing creatures who get a bad rap!

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    1. jenny_o: I had heard that about crows. Quite definitely not 'bird-brained'.

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  37. EC - I don't know if you'll be able to access this page or the documentary it links to, which is the one I saw that I refer to above, but if you're interested, it is fascinating:

    http://www.cbc.ca/documentaries/natureofthings/2009/murderofcrows/director.html

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    1. jenny_o: Firefox is having a hissy fit and not allowing me to watch videos at the moment, but I will have to see whether it will make an exception. Thank you.

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    2. jenny_o: The article was fascinating, and I have bookmarked the video waiting for firefox to do their fix. Thank you.

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  38. So cute birds, EC!
    Nice post, Indeed...

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  39. Hello from Germany! This is the first time I have been able to get on line as I am using my niece's wi-fi connection and after a week of merriment celebrating her wedding, we are finally slowing down.

    These are sweet looking birds and great photos :)

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    1. DeniseinVA: Thank you - and I hope you are having a WONDERFUL time.

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  40. Amazing photos, those birds are so utterly gorgeous. Also clever to leave the apple there-- I would've never thought of it.
    The silver eyes have captured my heart. They're very fairy-esque, might make an appearance in my manuscript now... or a painting, perhaps. :)
    Thank you for sharing.

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    1. Raquel Somatra: Green apples are a fixture on our shopping list because many of the birds that visit like them. And I would LOVE to see silvereyes in your manuscript - or a painting. I can see them being very happy there.

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  41. Such gorgeous birds! Especially the lorikeets. The only place to see birds that colorful here is at an aviary or tropical bird show. If they were in the trees around our house, I'd always be walking around with my nose in the air and my eyes scanning the branches.

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    1. Susan: We do spend a lot of time looking for and at the birds. Time well spent.

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  42. My sister once found a cockatoo in her backyard -- in November. It must've escaped from someone's house, locally, being that it was only 30 degrees or so outside and wasn't dead. She never did find the owner, despite posting, and now has a large white bird who whistles at her. :-)

    Pearl

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    1. Pearl: The cockatoo was lucky. And so is your sister if whistling is all that it does. Cockatoos are skilled mimics. My mother's sent the dog up the road into a frenzy barking at it, and could also miaow like a cat. Many of them swear well too.

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  43. Dear EC, so many beautiful birds in Australia. I just never realized until I began following your blog. Thank you for sharing the abundance of your home. Peace.

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    1. Dee: So many beautiful birds all over the world. Feathered enchantment - and I am happy to share them.

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  44. Australia is a place of wonders.
    I am sad that I will never get to see them myself. But I have your blog for wonderful birds.

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    1. Friko: And I have your blog (and others) for glorious gardens and incredible writing.

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  45. I do love silvereyes and could set the clock by them in our main house where they would descend at a quarter past two every afternoon and pick the tiniest of insects of my bushes.

    Buy ladybugs because you love them by all means but plant anything in the onion family under your roses. It does not kill the aphids but the smell confuses them so much that they do not breed!

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    1. Arija: I can set a clock by the wattlebirds - who start calling at quarter to sparrow fart. And I will indeed plant some alliums or other oniony plants in an attempt to confuse the aphids. Thank you.

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  46. Oops, I lost my comment!
    Well, I'll just write it again...
    The birds in your country are as beautiful as the flowers! You must really love their visits. It makes me so want to cross the ocean and visit...with my camera!

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    1. Debora: I do love our birds, and welcome them each and every day. And you would be a very welcome visitor yourself...

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  47. I'd never even heard of lorikeets before! They're adorable.

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    1. John Wiswell: Bright, brash, beautiful - and a treat.

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  48. Always find the beautiful birds and get lovely captures..
    thanks for sharing, you're welcome at my new post about the Bollywood city Mumbai.

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    1. Ercotravels: Thank you - I will be over to visit Mumbai later on.

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  49. If you ever find some discarded feathers of these birds could you send me some x?

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    1. John Gray: I have never seen discarded lorikeet feathers - they are not here often enough, but we get lots of feathers from cockatoos. Would white ones be any good?

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  50. I like birds- they are so beautiful- I sometimes observe their habits and behavior; especially the crow and the raven. Thanks for sharing.

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    1. Betty Alark: I love birds - and am very fond of ravens.

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  51. Lovely birds, I suppose your kitties love watching them :)

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    1. petronela: They do. Watching with lust and murder in their hearts.

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  52. How truly lovely they are, just munching away :)

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