Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Sunday, 27 October 2013

Sunday Selections #143

Sunday Selections was originally brought to us by Kim, of Frogpondsrock, as an ongoing meme where participants could post previously unused photos languishing in their files. 

The meme is now continued by River at Drifting through life.  The rules are so simple as to be almost non-existent.  Post some photos under the title Sunday Selections and link back to River.

Like River, I generally run with a theme.  This week we had a mini outing.  Driving past Albert Hall I always admire the trees - so I asked for an excursion to a) share their beauty with the skinny one and b) take photos.  Albert Hall was opened in 1928, and I assume that the trees were planted for the opening.  They are certainly old, and their lower branches run along the ground - and then reach for the sky.

As far as I can find out the trees are Atlas Cedars.  Whatever they are - I love them.

As always clicking will embiggen.











And this is a nearby tree.  I am not certain what it is, but loved the texture of the bark.

96 comments:

  1. I love trees. Their branches and foliage seem to be expressions and twisted and odd branches and trunks I really really love. These are great!

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  2. The trees are remarkable. There is a stand of trees along the parking area. I wonder if they are the same cedars with the lower limbs removed over the years.

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    1. Joanne Noragon: I don't think so. Our national authority describes them as Cypress, but they do look to come from the same 'family'.

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  3. Hi EC...the Atlas Cedars come all the way from Morocco and Algeria...it's amazing that they flourish so well down you way, if that be the case. They look like they grow into large healthy trees.

    Happy Sunday to you and The Smaller Portion. :)

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    1. Lee: Thank you for telling me where they come from. These have, as I said, been here a loooong time. And I hope a longer time yet. They are listed on our Heritage Register, so the signs are good that they will be cared for.

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  4. Each tree seems do have a distinct personality--beautiful!!

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    1. fishducky: They are very, very beautiful.

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  5. happy Sunday to you, love the low lying branches and blue grey foliage, similar to Deodar Cedar trees grown more often here. here is a link to one that grew in my California garden, scroll to the bottom photo

    http://bluestarrgallery.blogspot.com/2008/12/great-blue-heron-gopher-getter.html

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    1. Linda Starr: Thank you for the link - they do look similar. Beautiful things...

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  6. WOW. I have never seen such trees. They are some of the best trees ever. I love them, the low, low branches, the graceful sprawl, also, the only trees I've ever seen which I could actually climb. Mega bonus. Brilliant pics! Thank you, they've cheered me up some these trees of yours.

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    1. All Consuming: I have often yearned to climb these - or at least to sit among the branches. With a book. Bliss.

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  7. What great trees, they are very interesting, I like the branches growing along the ground.
    Merle...........

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    1. Merlesworld: Aren't they lovely? One of my buses goes past them, and I always look at them.

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  8. They are stunning trees - thank you! Of course, I'm such a tree nut, I don't think I've ever seen an ugly one:)

    That's my kind of outing.

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    1. Alexia: I have a big weakness for trees too. Sometime in the next couple of weeks we are going to the Arbortetum, and I will indulge that weakness...

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  9. What gorgeous trees! I love the way the bottom branches undulate along the ground. A child could have a great time climbing them.
    I don't know much about trees but the bottom picture looks like a pine tree to me.
    I'm glad you and SP got out of the house for a fun outing!

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    1. River Fairchild: I don't think that only children could have fun in those trees. This fossil would like it too...
      I suspect you a right about the bark I loved - something in the conifer family anyway.

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    2. Let me rephrase that...kids would love running, jumping, tumbling all over them. Us fossils would grunt and squirm as we pretzel our way onto the branches before breaking into a sweat and panting but the enjoyment factor would be the same. :D

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    3. River Fairchild: They are low enough to the ground that the sweating and panting would be minimal (for those branches). And they look the perfect spot for curling up with a book. And the higher branches would call too - so yes, sweating, panting and big, big smiles.

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  10. I can imagine the cedar smell--how I love that. Those look like great tree-climbing trees to me. Even I would give it a try, despite the decades.

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    1. Susan Kane: We could share the joy. Plenty of branches, plenty of room...

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  11. Oh these are lovely! Beautiful graceful branches, and such pretty foliage. Wonderful to climb I bet!

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    1. Karen: There are a lot of us who would like to nestle into those branches. It could be quite a party.

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  12. Cedrus atlantica, sometimes called Lebanese cedar. They certainly are stunning trees.
    In answer to you question on my roses, you are quite right, it is called 'The Prince'. It makes a rather weedy bush prone to black spot but the actual rose is even deeper purply red than I was able to achieve in the shot.

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    1. Arija: Aren't they beautiful. And I love that they are heritage listed. The Prince is an incredible rose and I will certainly keep my eye out for it. I would certainly forgive its weediness and tendency to black spot for a bloom like that. Thank you.

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  13. Fascinating trees! They would indeed be fun to climb...maybe take a nap on the branches!

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  14. These are magnificent trees, EC. Thank you for bringing them into my living room. :-)

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    1. DJan: It was my pleasure. And I hope your weekend continues to be full of fun and friends.

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  15. Atlas Cedar; nice to finally have a name for the trees I see around here. There aren't many in this area, but I do like them. That one you have pictured is fabulous with the low branches. I can picture small children clambering over and under, just generally playing.

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    1. River: I don't know nearly enough about trees, and was pleased to have a name for trees I have loved for years.

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  16. Add me to the climbing group. I'll bring bandaids.....

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    1. River: Yay, another one for the party. Hopefully the bandaids won't be needed.

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  17. I love them, too - and seem to be in good company here! They remind me of something you might find in a Dr. Seuss book! Thanks for sharing them.

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    1. jenny_o: Lots and lots and lots of us. Which is wonderful. I hadn't thought of the Dr Seuss connection - but you are right.

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  18. Love the trees. i breathed these in. Thank you. I wonder how you find so many beautiful places to visit. it's as if beauty singles you out and sings to you.

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    1. Myrna R.: I am lucky and live in a beautiful city. And the beauty does sing to me, and I answer its siren call.

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  19. HI ECSo many beautiful trees along your bus route. Lovley for children to use them as climbing frames.

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  20. What fabulous trees which all seem to have minds of their own. My 3 granddaughters would have loved to climb them when they were young. Thank you for sharing them with us. I did embiggen them which showed them in their true splendour. The final tree looks almost like some kind of pine but don't quote me.

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    1. Mimsie: I have loved these trees for as long as I can remember - and cannot think why it took me so long to take their photograph.

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  21. Magnificent. I actually sucked in my breath looking at those. Beautiful.

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  22. Where do you get all these marvellous views from? Your photos are absolutely beautiful. Many thanks.

    Greetings from London.

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    1. A Cuban in London: I am lucky enough to live in a beautiful (and underappreciated) city. I am glad that you also enjoy the things I love.

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  23. I LOVE the structure of that tree. So free and flowing. I love the way the branches look like they are saying...I am my own free spirit. Each tree that we see has it's distinctive look. Just like people there is something special about each one.

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    1. Teresa: This pair is very close to my heart too.

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  24. Tree hugger than I am, the limbs of that tree, low, curling....and reaching out for ME, scared the bejesus out of me. Honest. Hard to even look at the photo. *slinking away, hoping it doesn't see me*

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    1. lotta joy: I am sorry that they freaked you out. They just want to be friends - really they do.

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  25. I love messing around on low branches like those. They are as tusks or elephant trunks, except much less stabby.

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    1. John Wiswell: And unlike elephant's don't fart. I once rode on an elephant and travelled in a cloud of elephant fart. Which I remember better than the ride...

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  26. So glad you were able to get out and enjoy the beauty of these lovely old trees that you love so much.. and share them with SO and B.

    I pray you are all well and happy :)

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  27. Oh, what a magnificent old specimen. I would be so very, very tempted to sit among the beautiful branches!
    I'd love to have a go at laying lengthways along on one, get my balance just right and while away some time, staring up into the network of filigree.

    I grew a Blue (Glauca) Atlas Cedar years ago, but it was still very young when we sold the property.

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    1. Vicki: I do hope that your Blue Atlas Cedar survived and thrived. And how nice to have another fan of these beautiful trees.

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  28. It is a lovely old tree and you have portrayed it beautifully. I would love to sit in its shade on a warm day, with the sunlight trickling through its branches.

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    1. DeniseinVA: Just driving past these trees always makes me smile.

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  29. What amazing trees Soosie. How majestic :-)

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    1. farawayinthesunshine: Majestic is a wonderful description of them - thank you.

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    1. Weekend-Windup: They are very big trees, and I love them.

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  31. --There is something so beautiful and magical and poetic about roots.
    I love these!
    Xxxxx LOVE!

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    1. My Inner Chick: I love them too. So much. Beautiful and majestic and poetic says it for me - thank you.

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  32. What the unique tree! great find, friend.. thanks for sharing.

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  33. Amazing looking the tree! really I like your captures.
    Such great post, EC!

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    1. Ercotravels: More trees coming up in the next week or so.

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  34. Oh, those trees are very cool! I'm inviting myself to your tree-climbing party. I'll bring jaunty sunhats for everyone!

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    1. Ms. CrankyPants: Ooh. A hat party. With trees. WooHoo.

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  35. Cedar trees? Yes I do and thank you very much! :)

    Gary :)

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    1. klahanie: Dear Gary, I am always happy when the punster strikes. Thank you.

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  36. I always like to imagine what those old trees have seen. Lovely post.

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    1. Lynn: Another romantic. So do I. And I love to think of them being here long after I am gone too.

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  37. I love how the lower branches of the atlas cedar touch the ground. I wonder if they grow roots when they do? If so, I guess they would grow a new tree, and the old tree would have its children near.

    The bark on the other tree looks like pine bark.

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    1. Carol Kilgore: I think the wood is too hard for it to put out roots when it touches the ground - so the branches just run along it until they can reach for the sky again.
      And yes, I think it is a pine (of some sort).

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  38. I've never seen anything like this before. Some of those lowest branches look like arms reaching out for whoever they can get. Or maybe I just have Halloween on the brain!

    Thanks for your good wishes on Father Dragon's blog about my cover reveal. I appreciate them! :-)

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    1. Lexa Cain: It was my pleasure to wish you well - both at Father Dragon's site and at klahanie.
      And I think, hope, that Halloween has got to you. These are friendly trees. Really they are...

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  39. Replies
    1. ladyfi: Aren't they? A joy and a delight every time I see them, no matter what the time of the day or the season.

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  40. There are few things more beautiful than trees and branches, in my opinion. These are lovely!

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    1. Paper Chipmunk (aka Ellen): Aren't they?

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  41. What majesty ... and wouldn't you like to know what they have seen over the years. If only they could talk. In many ways they do, but not in a language most understand. I love trees, especially old ones ... they are such kind survivors ...

    Andrea @ From the Sol

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    1. Andrea: Majesty, beauty and endurance. In the one package. Ents were probably my favourite character from Lord of the Rings.

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    2. Mine too ... and I wish in real life they could strike out at those who so offend them in nature. They have earned thier place and man would take it away ... but it will be our loss in the end.

      Andrea

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  42. Wow, Cedars of Lebanon got nothing on YOU!!!


    Very cool


    ALOHA from Honolulu
    Comfort Spiral
    =^..^=

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  43. Gorgeous trees, beautiful photography. I can't believe how wide and massive those lower branches grow out! It looks so supportive, good for climbing, I imagine.

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    1. Raquel Somatra: I have never climbed them - or seen anyone else do so. I would love to - and will give it serious thought.

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  44. I would love to go stand under that tree.

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    1. Riot Kitty: It is getting crowded under those trees now - which is lovely.

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  45. Naturally you always admire trees, Sue, & me too. So solid, grounded, rooted, tall, firm, breathing, beautiful.

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    1. wordsfallfrommyeyes: I love them - and am glad to find another fan.

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  46. Dear EC, I've never before seen trees whose branches rested on the ground. I'd read about the "cedars of Lebanon" and I'm wondering if Atlas Cedars are the same as those cedars. Thanks for sharing these. A new sight for me. Peace.

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