Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Thursday, 21 November 2013

Our baby Arboretum

Today we went on a small outing.  Something we have been meaning to do for ages.  It was a very grey day but the promised rain didn't happen while we were out (or at least not more than a little incontinent pigeon rain - splat, splat and it was gone).

We went to our National Arboretum, which was officially opened in February this year.  Trees being slow growing, I will be long gone before it comes into its full glory, but I was excited to see the work already done and the promise it offers.

It is on a 250 hectare (620 acre) site, and was created after the area was burnt out in the Christmas 2001 and 2003 Canberra bushfires.  Planting began in 2005 and it is now home to over 90 forests of rare, endangered and symbolic trees from Australia and around the world.  Over 35 000 trees have been planted.

Many, many photos follow - which as always will embiggen if clicked upon.  The forests are small, but they will grow and the location is beautiful.  There is an amphitheatre - for concerts in the forest, walking trails, a cafe, restaurant and children's play area.  Joy.




This is a California Fan Palm - and I loved the tendrils on each leaf.

















The dragon trees are obviously dangerous - they were all caged.





The entrance to the Visitors Centre.  I really liked the use of natural materials.












Detail from the railing at a look-out.












104 comments:

  1. How thrilling to see this modern arboretum! You did a Marvelous job! They should link to your post.♥


    Aloha

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    1. Cloudia: It is a beautiful spot. Thank you so much.

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  2. Oh what wonderful photos EC! Very atmospheric.

    I love trees and also arboretums.
    You are very fortunate to have such an amazing, and huge, example.
    Won't it look fantastic in many years to come?
    Will have to put it on our list when we visit Canberra again one day.

    At first glance, the top photo almost looks like the "old" painted images and early photos of Australia, before the urban sprawl and city skyscrapers.
    So wonderfully clothed with green.
    I love it!

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    1. Vicki: It will look incredible as the years go by - and at the change of seasons. It is less than twenty minutes drive away so we will be back - often. In summer that green will become gold...

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    1. dinahmow: My pleasure - isn't it an incredible place?

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  4. This is beautiful and so interesting. Your country seems to be pretty forward-thinking. It is more common in our country to clear-cut old evergreen growth and log ancient tree giants. For the almighty dollar, of course.

    The sculptures and rock wall are wonderful additions to the landscape too.

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    1. jenny_o: Our country is also driven by profit far too often. We had a chief Minister who was forward thinking - the arboretum was one of his babies and he was also passionately committed to public art. These factors made me warm to him - but he attracted a LOT of criticism.

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  5. You're preaching to a gardener here. Wonderful project promising stunning horticultural effects. My compliments and thanks for excellent photos!

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    1. Geo.: Isn't it a delight? I love my garden too and am so impressed by the vision which has given us the arboretum.

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  6. It's going to be gorgeous--I LOVE Nest III!!

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    1. fishducky: Nest is very special isn't it? And I could see some raptors in the thermals above the site too.

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  7. 35,000 trees! Heaven on earth. I laughed at the dragon trees being caged and I love the steel nest!
    I wish I had room for, well not 35,000 trees, but maybe 35.

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    1. River: I think it is an absolutely brilliant idea - and I hope that as the years go by more land is allocated and more trees planted. I saw a joking suggestion that it could be used as a cemetery and said immediately that I would be very happy to feed a tree there.

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  8. I am glad you showcased the national arboretum ~ it is a concept which captured my imagination when it was opened as part of the Centenary. I like the sculptures and in time I am sure they will blend in with the trees. Pigeon rain huh? :)

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    1. Carol in Cairns: Splat, splat. No more. Isn't the arboretum beautiful? With the promise of more beauty for generations to come.

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  9. I haven't been to Canberra for 15 years I just worked it out we had friends down there and went a fair bit but they split up and don't go now. I saw the fires on the news, they were very close to homes but didn't realise that was 10 years ago, they say the older you get the faster time go they could be right.
    This is a great project and will look wonderful in a few more years when they let the Dragon trees out of their cages.
    Merle......................

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    1. Merlesworld: Too close to homes. More than 500 homes were destroyed, and lives were lost. We had fires at the end of our street - and it was my birthday.
      I think the Arboretum will get better, and better and better - and am looking forward to them releasing the dragons.

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    2. Oh, my, EC - that would be terrifying. I remember hearing about the fires for quite awhile on Canadian news.

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    3. jenny_o: It was frightening. At three oclock when the worst of the firestorm hit you couldn't see across the road - except when flames leapt into the air.

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  10. This was such a great post. I am glad you were safe from the dragon tree. Will you email me? Thanks. I cannot find yours.

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    1. Practical Parsimony: Thank you - it is a really lovely place. Email sent.

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  11. HI EC Wow! what forsight and vision to create this wonderful place adn as each year passes it will be even better adn more matures. Lovely that they have not only planted many trees but added the wonderful sculptues into the landscape. The visits are fantastic. Thanks for sharing a great post.

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    1. Margaret Adamson: It is going to keep improving long after the man whose vision it was has gone, long after I am gone - and that thought makes me smile.

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  12. Very pretty place! This is a great idea that will get even better in time. I love how they caged the drageon trees. lol

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    1. Teresa: The caged dragons tickled my fancy.

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  13. amazing..I have a huge love for nature and the idea of so many trees being planted is a blessing....

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    1. petronela: It is such a beautiful and serene place and will keep on getting better for many, many years to come.

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  14. This is so wonderful - I felt as if I was with you. You did a great job of capturing so many little details. I love that welded bird and nest piece. And the caged trees - funny. :)

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    1. Lynn: I was very restrained - and only took 116 photos. It is the little things which capture me every time. I am glad that you also enjoy them.

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  15. Thank you for sharing this post. The photographs are a marvelous gift. It is wonderful to know such a place exists. The welded metal sculpture is an exotic piece that certainly captured my eye.

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    1. Grannie Annie: I am so happy that the Arboretum was established. And would be happy to see rather more of them. We plan on going back to this one often. Nest is stunning isn't it? And somehow belongs there...

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  16. Hey Elephant's Child,

    I've seen you around forever (like at Laura's and other places) and think I may have even stopped by before. If not, I am now.

    Lovely photos, and what a great use of land after the fires. The sculptures were also great. I really liked the "wild brown land." That looked like the word "land" from behind. Cool. And the metal bird nest made from scrap.

    These photos were great...go yearly and take pics of the same...see how much they grow over the years. And the "caged" dragon trees were hilarious.

    M.L. Swift, Writer

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    1. M.L. Swift: Welcome - we do frequent some of the same places, and it is lovely to have you drop in.
      The fires were heartbreaking and the land was black for a loooong time. This is such an improvement.

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  17. What the beautiful shot looking in your photos! all photos are fantastic..
    Great post

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    1. Swati Singh: Thank you - it is a beautiful spot.

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  18. I loved seeing the baby arboretum and the art work is fantastic. Thanks for the tour.

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    1. Delores: Now that we have got to it - we will be back. Often.

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  19. That eagle will be in the nest for awhile. Love the art work and the information about the trees. I'm so glad you were able to get out and about and give me some pictures as well!.There's a smile between the lines in your post! :-)

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    1. DJan: It is an incredible space, so close to home and so beautiful. And yes there were and are several smiles.

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  20. It will be even more glorious years down the road. Well done! I went back and forth in the "embiggens" studying the detail. Love the palms, too. Those tendrils are like flax and can be spun into thread. I believe natives used them to make rope.

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    1. Joanne Noragon: The chief Minister in question has given us a HUGE gift. I am really looking forward to a concert in the forest there too.

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  21. Marvelous place! Beautiful trees, that Dragon Tree is so interesting. Thanks for stopping by and letting me know you are also getting these list of links from my blog. Now that you are the third person who has mentioned it I think I may have a clue as to what is going on, but before I do anything I am going to make a post and ask for some advice.

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    1. DeniseinVA: The Dragon Tree fascinated me - as did learning that the resin is used to make dragon's blood. Dragons are one of my most favourite beasts.

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  22. How beautiful! And so huge, and open, and interesting, and unusual....I love it all. The artwork is amazing and is perfect there, too. Thanks so much for sharing your outing and the photos!

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    1. Becky: As the trees grow it will become a little less open - but the beauty will grow with the trees.

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  23. What a gorgeous place and so scenic too!

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  24. SO beautiful, and your photos are glorious. I love that this place exists, I love any place the honors trees, really, but the combination of rare and endangered trees makes this place sacred.

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    1. Raquel Somatra: Honours, cherishes and preserves trees. A triple treat.

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  25. How exciting to be able to watch this beautiful place rejuvenate. Lovely shots! I really like that bird nest metal sculpture.

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    1. Karen: I loved it too - and perched at the top of a crest it looked so 'right'.

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  26. I just loved that first photo top to bottom. What a view! Many thanks for the tour.

    Greetings from London.

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    1. A Cuban in London: I live in a beautiful city - and this spot epitomises it. I am so glad that you enjoyed it too.

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  27. I think Skippy would approve :-)

    Seriously, what an inspired idea. I had to blink twice when I saw the idea came out of Canberra (never known for much in the way of brilliant ideas). What a great concept making use of this area that was so affected with the bushfires. I think it's going to be a stunning place in itself when mature and such an asset to the country and the environment. I hope they commit to it in the long term.

    I really loved the sculptures as well, even though I am generally not fond of public sculptures. This time I think they are spot on - they enhance the idea so well.

    I giggled at the dragon trees, although we've just built something similar (though a lot uglier) for our newly planted dwarf cherry tree. We get a lot of wild hares and red deer around here who love to gnaw on the bark of young trees, so we need protection. I'm guessing it's something similar here, though protecting the leaves instead. Kangaroo attack, maybe?

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    1. Marie: I like Canberra, and think it is a beautiful place, but this is a brainwave. Future generations can only benefit. And yes, I do hope that the commitment remains.
      I assumed that the Dragon cages were protection against kangaroos - but it surprised me. Many more tender looking plants weren't caged.

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  28. I'm not much of the sculptures, but the rest is awfully pretty.

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    1. Snowbrush: I loved the sculptures and the trees. And the location. I also like that it is attracting some wonderful singers...

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  29. The Wide Brown Land sculpture is really cool! These are great photos of a place I'd love to visit if I ever make it to Australia.

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    1. Kathleen Cassen Mickelson: I really liked the Wide Brown Land installation too. And next time we visit the Arboretum the land will certainly be brown. Golden if we go there soon, and brown and bare shortly afterwards. The trees are watered with recycled water, so will survive to soften the harshness of summer.

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  30. What an extraordinary place!

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    1. Wendy: It is - and will keep on getting better.

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  31. Aren't they beautiful, the scenery is superb.

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    1. Bob Bushell: My city is not highly regarded, considered boring (debateable) and full of polliticians (sadly true). But when it gets it right, it gets it very right.

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  32. What a wonderful way to renew an area that was burnt. These trees will inspire visitors for years to come. Your photos are very nice and show the arboretum in all its loveliness. I love trees and will remember things because of trees. For example last year I had my car inspected in a town north of here, and I could not remember the address, but I had noticed the beautiful huge tree across the street – well I found it again by looking at the trees along the highway and recognized it, the garage was right there.

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    1. Vagabonde: I think it was an inspired way to renew the land, hope and beauty. And I am a confirmed tree lover myself.

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  33. Okay - this has gone to the top of my List of Reasons to Visit Canberra. Planting an arboretum on the burnt land was an inspired idea, and an initiative which should give every tree-lover hope. Thank you so much for allowing us to visit with you, EC. The sculptures are great, too - especially the Nest, and the Wide Brown Land is cool. They complement the trees' sculptural beauty.

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    1. Alexia: It was an expensive initiative - and in my mind and heart, worth every last cent. A plan for the future...

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  34. It is a marvelous place now. Oh, what will it be in a decade? A score? Magnificent.

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    1. Susan Kane: Magnificent indeed. And what will it be in a hundred years? Or more. I love the idea of establishing long-term beauty.

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  35. What a gorgeous place! Although I am giggling like a junior high school girl over the "pinus" tree.

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    1. Riot Kitty: Every giggle is a good giggle in my book.

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  36. The welded steel bird and nest is awesome. I love it!

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    1. Birdie: So did I. I thought they were a beautiful addition to the space.

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  37. What the amazing landscapes! the lake views looking pleasant
    Such fabulous scenery...

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    1. Ercotravels: Thank you - it is a truly beautiful spot.

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  38. What a gorgeous idea and I love the lookouts!
    It's a shame trees take so long to grow but it will be beautiful in time. That's a great-looking visitor's center too.
    Yes, those Dragon trees look quite ferocious. ;)

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    1. River Fairchild: Fear of dragons is obviously very real...

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  39. What a wonderful place! It's like a massive investment of hope in the future... something we need a whole lot more of in this world.

    I LOVE your description comparing the rain to an incontinent pigeon... very clever, and it made me laugh out loud.

    I also love the sculptures. I've never seen a sculpture based on someone's handwriting before, but they're very effective and imaginative.

    Happy weekend!

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    1. Susan Flett Swiderski: You summed up the way I feel beautifully 'a massive investment of hope...' Thank you.

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  40. Thanks for sharing your photos. It looks like you had a fun time.

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    1. Lady Litith BloodCrave: It was a nice outing. Thanks.

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  41. Nice to get away for a bit. This looks absolutely beautiful. In the US, they don't do much about regenerating what's been left from a brush fire. It's a shame. What a beautiful thing to replenish.

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    1. Deb: We tend to not do much about bush fires either. We wait for rain and natural regeneration. Canberra's fires were big, and death and destruction were all that could be seen for a long time. This is a decided improvement.

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  42. Nice! It's great someone had the foresight to create such a place for the future. Dragon trees, what a tremendous name for a tree.

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    1. Strayer: I am really looking forward to the time that they release the dragons from their cages.

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  43. To see the transformation after such devastation is a marvel to behold. Regeneration is vitally important. Your photos are a nice, thoughtful visit.

    Thank you, Sue.

    Gary

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    1. klahanie: Thank you Gary. Penny would like it out there too. And yes, regeneration and in this case transformation are wonderful things.

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  44. Absolutely love this post. There's so much hope in the planting of trees, and the views are magnificent. I'm a big fan of trees, myself and Spatz will stop when walking/cycling purely to stand and talk about how great one or another is, move off the beaten track to see another better. The sculptures are right up my street too. It'd be great for you to return to the same spots and take more pictures in a couple of years time, to see the advancement of the lush and green. The world looks so fine when we look at it through your eyes.

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    1. All Consuming: I too am a tree fan. Big time. There are some magnificent ones around and - the more the merrier. I do plan on taking more photos at the Arboretum as the trees grow and, hopefully, as more forests are planted.

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  45. Loved all of it and thank you for sharing. What a wonderful job they have done there. That Californian Palm reminded me of the Cotton Palm, the ones that grow so very tall here.
    That bird and its next was something else. I recently had an email of various sculptures a man in a wheelchair had made entirely out of spanners. If you would like me to email it to you then send me your email address (I believe Karen gave you mine recently). They are really worth seeing.
    Too many wonderful things to comment on...just all so beautiful.

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    1. Mimsie: Thank you. I will email you later in the day because I suspect that I, and the skinny one, would love the spanner sculptures.

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  46. Yea-up! Beware of those fire-breathing dragon trees... sounds like a wonderful outing...and lovely photos as always. Thanks for sharing, E C.

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    1. Lee: It is a wonderful place. And, such a change, it was brought about by a politician...

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  47. Very beautiful - even though it isn't filled in yet! It will be fun to see it 'grow up' over the next few years!

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    1. daisyfae: It has a lot of promise for the years ahead doesn't it?

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  48. I enjoyed all these - wonderful :)

    What a great excursion. Those dragon trees caged though, bizarre.

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    1. wordfallfrommyeyes: It was a wonderful outing. I am still confused about the dragon cages. It was, as someone suggested earlier, probably to protect them - but they were the only trees in cages...

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  49. Love the sculptures. It's great what they accomplished with this area. Beware the dragons!

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    1. Carol Kilgore: I have a big, big weakness for dragons and would like to release these...

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  50. How is it possible that "Bent Iron" can look so beautiful & artful?
    It does.
    ..hoping your are well, S. Xxxx

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    1. My Inner Chick: I loved it too - both sculptures just looked so 'right'. I am struggling a bit, but fine. How are you and yours?

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