Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Sunday, 3 November 2013

Sunday Selections #144

Sunday Selections was originally brought to us by Kim, of Frogpondsrock, as an ongoing meme where participants could post previously unused photos languishing in their files. 

The meme is now continued by River at Drifting through life.  The rules are so simple as to be almost non-existent.  Post some photos under the title Sunday Selections and link back to River.

Like River, I generally run with a theme.   And, just for a change, my theme is a return to some of my obsessions.  As always, clicking will embiggen.

I adore foxgloves, and iris and they are very happy in the garden at the moment.







As is this patch of pigface (dreadful name).


The birds continue to give me joy.  These cockatoos were watching me nearly as intently as I was watching them.




And on Friday evening the sunset coloured a jet trail beautifully...



116 comments:

  1. Beautiful blooms. I have never seen an iris that colour, it's gorgeous! Excellent cockatoos and a blissful sunset!

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    1. Karen: Thank you. Colourful obsessions to brighten my world.

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  2. Pretty pretty flowers, I'm fond of foxgloves too, but never grown them.
    Merle...........

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    1. Merlesworld: I am fond of anything which will come back year after year. And multiply...

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  3. Beautiful and delightful series of photos. The flowers are gorgeous and those birds are always a treat.

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  4. Foxgloves and irises are two of my very favorites! How I would love to spend time in your garden!

    There is a sweet little pig that lives in a backyard with his Rottweiler friend in a nearby neighborhood, and today when we walked by with the dogs I went over and petted the little guy for the first time (had to do it through a chain link fence, so I couldn't give him a belly rub or scratch behind his ears - the PROPER way to introduce yourself to a pig!) :-) He stood on his hind legs and grunted little joyful grunts at me and waggled his little corkscrew tail - he was adorable, but he looked nothing like those flowers you say are called "Pigface!" I can't figure out why they would have that name! But they're very pretty.

    Your "Cockatoos and Contrails" photos would be great SkyWatch Friday candidates!

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    1. Laloofah: I would be very happy to welcome you to the jungle.
      I have a fondness for pigs - intelligent and much maligned animals. And I have no idea why we call those plants 'pigface'. I have white, yellow, pink and this red one too.
      Thank you for the accolade for my cockies and contrails. I do admire the skywatch photos each week on so many of my favourite blogs.

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  5. I'm so glad to see that it's summer somewhere on our beautiful planet. Right now I'm experiencing driving rain and temperatures dropping to freezing. Brrr! And those beautiful cockatoos! :-)

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    1. DJan: It is warming up fast here. Too fast. And too high - and, as usual, I would welcome some of your rain. The countryside is going brown before our eyes.

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  6. The color of the iris in the top photo is incredible! Foxgloves have been favorites of mine for so long - they remind me of my childhood and Sunday afternoon walks. I wish we had cockatoos here!

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    1. Carola Bartz: My mother always grew foxgloves too. And that iris was a real find.
      Cockatoos are a very mixed blessing. I love them, but they can be very destructive. And sometimes flock in their hundreds. Farmers are NOT fond of them.

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  7. Oh dear, my foxgloves are still in a pun net where they have sat for a good two months while I have been meaning to get them into the ground. Other things took precedence and I don't have any soil prepared for them even yet.
    Sorry I cannot send you what I haven't got, it hasn't rained here for quite some time and I am racing to madly mulch and save what I can from the North wind. I have an almost black, deep purple, frilled Iris that has been giving me great joy although I mainly grow the old-fashioned scented varieties.
    The shots of the cockies against the stormy sky are real gems.

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    1. Arija: You have had a lot on your plate. Hopefully you will get foxgloves in next year.
      Your deep purple iris sounds wonderful. Most of ours are a mauve, though between bearded iris, dutch iris and japanes iris we have them around for weeks.

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  8. Absolutely beautiful. As always. I love the foxgloves, and the color of that first iris. Stunning.

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  9. How absolutely, divinely beautiful. I've just come back from the supermarket and admiring the jacaranda trees in full bloom dotted along the way. I should have taken my camera with me...I never think to do so!

    Have a wonderful Sunday, EC....and good luck on Cup Day! :)

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    1. Lee: Jacaranda trees are a treat we don't get here. Gorgeous things.
      I will probably not bet on the Cup - which I know is unAustralian of me...

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    2. I love the Cup Carnival...I watch all the races from the Cox Plate last weekend through to the final day, Emirates' Day next Saturday. I love Melbourne Cup Day and I watch every race on the day...and all the lead-up rigamarole. I only have a bet on the Cup...hardest race to bet on...but that's the only time I have a bet. And I have my own little party, just with me and me. I'm not into going out to organised Cup luncheons...no one listens to the races; and of them wouldn't know one end of a horse to the other! ;) I'd rather do my own thing here at home; it's my own little tradition...I've got lots of tasty goodies to munch on throughout the day and some wine chilling in the fridge if I feel like it. And if anyone interrupts my party...I won't answer the door or the phone! lol

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    3. Lee: I am sorry I missed this. I LOVE the idea of you having a Cup Party on your own, and hope you had a ball.

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  10. That is a gorgeous sunset. Pigface? Who came up with that, for such a pretty flower?

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    1. Riot Kitty: It is a succulent groundcover and I had to google it to find out its real name. Pigface is what it is sold as too - weird isn't it?

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  11. Beautiful! I love iris's and foxglove also. Aren't some plant names funny!

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    1. Teresa: Some plant names are gorgeous, and you can at least see where some of the common names come from. Pigface is a mystery though.

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  12. I'm not a huge fan of iris, but I do like the red one you have there. I LOVE foxgloves (and delphiniums too, do you have any?), I tried to grow foxgloves once and only one plant came up with very sparsely placed flowers. I just checked my seeds box and there is another packet of seeds in there, the date stamp says sow by august 2011, ha ha. It may even be the original packet since the top is sticky taped shut. I'll find a large pot and try them in that.
    I love the birds watching you, were they waiting for you to go inside so they could come down to the feeders?
    My mum loved pigface, she lived in Port Pirie where the soil is red dusty dirt that packs hard each summer, but pigface did well there for her.

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    1. River: I do indeed have delphiniums - though they have been and gone for the year.
      I suspect the the cockatoos were waiting for me to go inside - though there were a couple on the feeder the whole time I was outside.
      We have a number of pigface, in a range of colours. A nice hardy plant. And forgiving.

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  13. As always, your photos astound me! In Illinois, we called irises "flags", don't know why. I love them, and your red is striking.
    Have not seen foxglove out here in San Diego in a long time.

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    1. Susan Kane: My mother always talked about 'flag iris', and used the term interchangeably with 'bearded iris'. I tend to use the latter.
      I wonder whether foxglove have fallen out of fashion in San Diego?

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  14. Pig face? pigface? Over here we call them ice plants, which I'm sure you'll agree is a MUCH nicer name!

    Beautiful colours, EC - I've never seen a red iris that colour. My mother grew foxgloves, but I never have.

    Thank you for the cockies, too, and the gorgeous skies. My friend and I are doing a tour of open gardens next weekend. I can't wait! Have a great week.

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    1. Alexia: Ice plants is indeed a much nicer name. I will have to google and see whether they are the same plant - or just similar.
      Have a wonderful time touring open gardens. Such a treat - and brave gardeners. I wouldn't have the courage to open ours up...

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  15. I always seem to be envying something in your garden, EC, and now it's your foxgloves! Gorgeous, and the iris are stunning. So dry here, all going brown and crusty, and so much fallen gum bark, we can't keep up with it. A drop of rain would be sooo nice.

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    1. Carol: Summer is rushing in here too. Some rain would be more than welcome. I have been watching the hills go brown before my eyes.

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  16. As ever your garden delights me and thanks once again for sharing its beauty. I must remember to show Phil the foxgloves. We seldom see them in gardens here and they remind him of England.
    You could always give the little flowers their proper name of mesembryanthemum and not call them pig face! Actually I am not sure they truly are pig face as they (pig face) do go under the name of Carpabrotus which are those large fleshy plants we sometimes see near the coast (or I think that is the place for them over here). Perhaps the mesys are a smaller version. You are the gardener so would probably know if I'm going off at a tangent and getting it all wrong.
    That iris is spectacular and I love the parrots as we don't have them over here in the West. What wonderful visitors you have in your garden.

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    1. Mimsie: Our succulents are certainly related to pig face, and are sold in all the nurseries under that name. And mesembryanthemum is such a mouthful.

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    2. OK. It's just I don't think they call them pig face here and I just love saying mesembryanthemum. It sort of rolls of the tongue so smoothly. : )
      Phil loved the fox gloves and said he remembers them growing wild in the woods in England.

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    3. Mimsie: I am glad that Phil loved the fox gloves - and suspect they reminded my mother of home too.

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  17. Lovely red iris. And the cockatoos seem very exotic to me here in NZ - our garden birds are very ordinary by comparison.

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    1. lynners: I had never seen that iris before and am now nurturing it, with every hope it will breed. And I envy you keas - which are probably more intelligent and more destructive than cockatoos.

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  18. Birds and blossoms do bring us joy! You bring me joy when you fly by to visit me,


    ALOHA from Honolulu
    Comfort Spiral
    =^..^=

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    1. Cloudia: Birds and blossom are joy epitomised. And I love visiting you.

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  19. I love those speckled foxgloves EC ~ very olde world.

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    1. Carol in Cairns: Lots of this garden is filled with 'olde fashioned plants'.

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  20. Ahhh, a sight for sore eyes are these photos.

    I too adore "foxies", as I called them in my old country garden. There's something very traditionally cottage - and Shakespearean - about them. And still of medicinal value, though, with caution.

    That burgundy-rust iris at the top is breathtaking.

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    1. Vicki: While I know that fox gloves are used medicinally, I don't know enough - so leave them alone and just enjoy the beauty.

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  21. There are no words to describe the beauty of that flower in your first picture, top to bottom. And I love the way you closed your post with that magnificent sunset.

    Greetings from London.

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    1. A Cuban in London: Thank you - and that sunset was a delightful finish to the day in which it appeared. I am glad that you enjoyed it too - and the symbolism.

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  22. I love iris, too, and we planted three bearded iris in our new garden for next year. They were six dollars a bulb. Didn't they grow in ditches,too, when I was a child?

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    1. Joanne Noragon: Iris bulbs are very expensive here too. We often sidestep the professionals and buy them from markets instead.

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  23. OMGosh,
    you actually have cockatiels in your trees!??!!! GORGEOUS! We need to buy them here in MN.

    Xxx hope you are well, dear S. Xxx

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    1. My Inner Chick: Cockatoos rather than cockatiels - and lots of them. And I would much rather see them in the trees, on the lawn, on the roof than in cages.
      Hugs.

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  24. Oh for the skies you see. Stunning colours, and the pig faces in the flower bed has got me laughing. They're so beautiful! The Iris is such a delicate pretty bloom, I used to have some in the garden of the house I lived in 14 years ago, and also when I was growing up Pa had them and Tiger Lilys together I recall. They were splendid side by side. x

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    1. All Consuming: Another old fashioned plant. And yes, the pig faces are a delight. You have me thinking whether I have tiger lilies in the same bed as the iris - probably.

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  25. Gorgeous pictures as always! The iris are spectacular and I still can't get over the birds you have all around you! Cockatoos are something one finds in a pet store here, not in the backyard.
    Pigface? Really? Who thought that one up? :)
    Hugs to you and pockets full of wishes come true.

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    1. River Fairchild: We are so lucky with our avian visitors. Much, much better here than in a cage. Jewel has lusted after a cockatoo since she first saw one... A cat of ambition, they are bigger than she is, and have impressive weaponry.
      I love the pockets full of wishes come through. Thank you - and right back at you. Now get writing..

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  26. What a refreshing promise of color your photos furnish a Californian in autumn.

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    1. Geo.: I am glad to offer a little refreshment. I have family in California, and love to see the differences in their (your) seasons.

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  27. those flowers are so vibrant and gorgeous and healthy, they seem as though they are live creatures, ones that can dance and talk!!! i've especially always seen irises as having faces, and yours are especially beautiful!!!

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    1. Raquel Somatra: Vibrant and gorgeous and healthy. Thank you. As a gardener I am thrilled to hear that - and see that. And I too see plants as having faces, and personalities...

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  28. Each one is a beauty to behold, gathered together they are a spectacular sight.
    My heart is smiling :).. thanks to your green thumb EC.

    Tha

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    1. Pam:): Thank you - I am glad to have created smiles.

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  29. So beautiful. As ever. You really do highlight the beauty on this Earth.

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    1. wordsfallfrommyeyes: Thank you - and there is a lot of beauty about.

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  30. That sky is amazing! Flowers are gorgeous - I'm so impressed you can do that. And it must be amazing to see birds like that flying around - they are always in cages around here. Sad.

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    1. Lynn: I am so happy that you enjoyed my obsessions. All of them. We have caged cockatoos here too, but many, many more flying around. Which is where they should be.

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  31. Gidday, human, Sue,

    My human and I always adore your photos. My human knew a pupil named Iris. And it's getting so cold here that the fox was wearing gloves.

    A happy garden, happy photos and a beautiful sunset. What a combination.

    Pawsitive wishes,

    Penny the Jack Russell dog and modest internet superstar! :)

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    1. klahanie: Penny, oh you of more than modest fame, I am always guarenteed a pun time when you or your human drop in. Thank you.

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  32. Pigface...looks a lot like aster. Is it the same thing? (I think the name pigface should be abolished immediately!)

    As with the kangaroos, I'm marveling at the birds you see just, you know, STROLLING around. Lovely!!

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    1. Ms. CrankyPants: No, not an aster - and thank you for the reminder. Something I don't have (at the moment).
      We are most appreciative of our wildlife. Every day. Even when the cockatoos pull up my tulips...

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  33. Beautiful everything! How wonderful it must be to see cockatoos and parrots in the wild as an everyday occurrence. And the pigface are so pretty. Maybe you could start a campaign to rename them. But that first iris - omigosh - it looks like sunset. Absolutely gorgeous. Thanks for sharing.

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    1. Carol Kilgore: Thank you. We do love our birds. And our garden.

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  34. Beautiful pictures, beautiful flowers. Thanks for sharing.

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  35. Alas, I suppose pigface is better than pigrectum. Whatever they call them, they're lovely.

    I always love looking at your beautiful flowers, delightful birds and glorious sunsets. Thanks for this most welcome, and inspirational, splash of colors today!

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    1. Paper Chipmunk (aka Ellen): Do I detect that your world has lurched to the dark side again? I hope not. I really, really hope not.

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  36. What a treat to see those lovely skies, birds and fabulous flowers! Greetings from a dark and rainy Stockholm.

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    1. ladyfi: Send some of that rain over here - please.

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  37. You weren't kidding about them having a good time in your garden! They all look gorgeous, my favorite being the second photo, where they look like they're dribbling down the post.

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    1. John Wiswell: They do look happy don't they?

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  38. One of my clients has pet cockatoos and I feel so bad for them stuck in a small cage. She yells at them when they make noise. It makes me sad. It is nice to see them outside and free where they belong.

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    1. Birdie: I suspect your client yells a lot. They are very noisy birds - who should be free.
      When I was growing up my mother had a cockatoo. He ate his way our of a large aviary - and never went back. He was perfectly happy stumping around the garden. And so were we.

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  39. (sigh) Looking at your pictures is almost as good as taking a brief vacation. Such beautiful flowers... and cockatoos... and sky. Thanks for sharing. (Even better than an actual vacation... it was FREE.)

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    1. Susan: Free has a lot of charm doesn't it? And I am very glad that you got some respite here today.

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  40. Those flowers! Gorgeous; the birds and the skyscapes too, of course.
    But most of all I relish the flowers; something to keep me going while my garden is dying.

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    1. Friko: Thank you. Sadly as we lurch into what promises to be a hot and dry summer, our garden is dying too. There is still some joy though.

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  41. Lovely set of photos with something for everyone.

    Everything seems more colourful and exotic in your country. I remember you saying that you would find deer exotic. I had the brilliant idea to take a picture of the deer that visit us regularly and send it to you. My wonderful idea lasted about 5 seconds, until I remembered that deer are mostly nocturnal, and I can't take nighttime photos with my little camera ... so, that is why I have no deer pictures for you :)

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    1. jenny_o: Sometime you will come across a deer with insomnia - and I will rejoice in its photo. (Mad deer and Englishmen come out in the midday sun?)

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    2. I am ever optimistic that this could happen, so stay tuned :)

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    3. jenny_o: I will do happy dances when the day comes.

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  42. Sunday Selections is such a good idea and yet I never seem to get a chance to join in.

    Pigface is such a funny name for something so beautiful! Ha. Lovely photos.

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    1. LL Cool Joe: We would love to see you, whenever you find/manufacture/steal the time.

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  43. Precious flowers and not the least the Cockatoos, they are superb.

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    1. Bob Bushell: Thank you. We love them both.

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  44. I always say this on your blog but, …. what a different WORLD you have there! More exotic animals and even the scenery is just super amazing. Thank you for sharing these beautiful images with us.

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    1. Deb: It is a wonderful world we live in - beauty everywhere. And your scenery always seems exotic to me, so we are even (not that it is a competition).

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  45. I just think it's awesome you have wild cockatoos looking into your yard - that's pretty cool.

    (And I had to chuckle at the pigface... who *did* come up with that name?

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    1. Mark Koopmans: We have lots and lots of cockies visting. Which is very cool - the food helps.
      The person who named the pigface was either a twisted individual or had a warped sense of humour. Both of which are fine by me.

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  46. Reminding me again of the long gone hot summer day when as a little lad I stuck my finger in a big foxglove flower in my granny's garden and got stung by a bee that was busy inside. Boo hoo... (and poor bee). Have been more careful about where I stick my fingers ever since.

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    1. Andrew Maclaren-Scott: Ouch. The most important lessons do seem to come with a touch of pain as re-inforcement don't they?

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  47. These pictures are absolutely breathtaking. Wow. And thank you for your kind words over at Delores' blog :)

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    1. Optimistic Existentialist: Welcome and thank you. And I am always in awe at the positive spin you find in the words Delores give us.

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  48. I did have a comment, yes I did, but it went away, mysteriously, permanently.

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    1. Snowbrush: I am sorry about that - your comments are always worth receiving. As is this one, because I know you have dropped in.

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  49. Wow, so pretty flowers, cute parrots and spectacular sky watching!! such well captures..
    Nice post!

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  50. What beautiful pictures to wake up to on this cold wet grey morning in England. But perfect cottage garden blooms. And the cockatoos are so exotic, especially against the fat greedy pigeons that seem to be the only birds visiting my garden. I have so enjoyed visiting. Thank you

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    1. Zig: We get fat greedy pigeons too - but the cockies see them off. Quickly.
      I am glad to have been able to brighten your morning - and would love some of your rain.

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  51. That sky is so surreal, it could inspire me to write so many stories. You do know how to capture magic, my lovely friend :).

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    1. petronela: Thank you. I do love the sky, night or day.

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  52. Natures rainbow brightening your world… Heavenly..

    Be well, be happy :)

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    1. Pam:): Be well, be happy is a wonderful way to end your comments. Thank you - and to you.

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  53. How beautifully white the cockatoos are. How sweet, watching you :).

    Lovely photos, Sue. I love your neck of the woods.

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    1. wordsfallfrommyeyes: They are gorgeous birds. Noisy - but beautiful.

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