Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Sunday, 8 February 2015

Sunday Selections #210

Sunday Selections was originally brought to us by Kim, of Frogpondsrock, as an ongoing meme where participants could post previously unused photos languishing in their files. 

The meme is now continued by River at Drifting through life.  The rules are so simple as to be almost non-existent.  Post some photos under the title Sunday Selections and link back to River.  Clicking on any of the photos will make them embiggen.

Like River I usually run with a theme.  I love my garden, and am obsessed with it.  However, this summer my get up and go has disappeared without me, and the garden has been neglected.  When I can track the missing vim and vigour down serious work is needed.

Luckily, some things are still blooming.  The tuberous begonias along the front verandah are just starting to flower and are a joy.







The next plant's name completely escapes me at the moment.  And has done for over a week.


Some of the many liliums we planted are flowering...


As is the hibiscus.


And the bromeliads...




Given how slack I have been, I have been very, very lucky.  Past work rewarded, and current neglect not punished as much as I expected (or possibly deserved).

138 comments:

  1. Plants can be very forgiving. The unidentified plant is interesting and not one I remember ever seeing.

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    1. Andrew: As soon as commentators nudged my failing memory it came to me. A pineapple lily - and they are popping up in a number of places. Sometimes plants can be forgiving - and other times the complete opposite.

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    2. Yes, mine are being rather sulky right now. Not a flower in sight! I should threaten them.

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    3. Guyana-Gyal: They sulk well don't they? Sometimes threats work, sometimes food (and drink) works, and sometimes ignoring them works. And none of those things work all the time.

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  2. What a lovely burst of colour.

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    1. Delores: The begonias are on the front veranda, and are a colourful entry to the house.

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  3. How cool to come here and not see photos of ice and snow! Your plants and flowers look amazing. Beautiful colours. Happy Sunday to you!

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    1. LL Cool Joe: I have been revelling in other people's snow and ice. It seems only fair to play 'swapsie'.

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  4. Gorgeous EC! I love these Sunday Selections of yours.

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    1. DeniseinVA: Sunday Selections is a fun meme.

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  5. Since we are in the middle of winter here, it's nice to see some color and beauty. Even if it's a little neglected.

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    1. Alex J. Cavanaugh: Sadly, a lot neglected. I will do better. Soon. Ish.

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  6. It looks like your plants are taking good care of themselves, EC.

    Fortunately the weather has cooled down considerably to what it was...well, it has up here, anyway. We've had light showers on and off over the past few days, and similar is to occur over this coming week, so it has been said.

    I hate the heat; it saps all energy; and I hate all the sweating, too...so I make no excuses whatsoever for being a sloth during the heat of summer...and nor should you! A tempting book is far more tempting in my book! :)

    I hope you and the Skinny One have a good week...cuddles to your furry mates from me.

    ReplyDelete
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    1. Lee: It is just as well that some at least of the garden IS taking care of itself. We had a few (very welcome) cooler days but are going to get hot again for the next week or so. Come on Autumn.
      And yes, books are calling me much louder than almost anything else.
      Thank you, and a good week to you are your furry overlords too.

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  7. The number 8 is splendid, it is out of this world EC.

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    1. Bob Bushell: It is heavily scented too. Too heavily scented to bring in - but a treat in the garden.

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  8. It's lovely seeing that some blog friend's garden have colour - anything that flowers in my garden (which isn't much I might add) has curled it's toes up in the heat and died! As yur garden shows EC, the hard yakka is worth it - and can even stand a little neglect. Well done. :)

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    1. Rose ~ from Oz: The garden is calling out for a LOT more hard work. And will get it. Eventually.

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  9. Your garden is stunning even without vigor. I wonder if we could grow vim and vigor? We would so be rich.

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    1. Sonya Ann: If I could grow vim and vigour I would hog them to myself at the moment. A vim and vigour hoarder...

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  10. Replies
    1. kylie: Some of it. Some of it is a disgrace.

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  11. I know how you feel. Although I love my gardens and eagerly look forward to spring and summer, last year my enthusiasm waned about the beginning of July. However, begonias like yours, do give me the lift to carry on.

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    1. Starting Over, Accepting Changes - Maybe: Summer is always a difficult time for me, but I usually manage to do a bit of work early. This year? Not a happening thing. The begonias are an annual treat though. And forgiving.

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  12. Replies
    1. Things Are Looking U.P.: I have been relishing your elegant monochromatic scenes...

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  13. Your garden is always a visual delight filled with such beautiful color. You have quite a variety of plants to enjoy all year round I'm imagining. My garden is buried beneath piles of old snow. Spring is approaching though. Have a good week EC !

    ReplyDelete
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    1. Whisper Mist: Our garden is at its best in spring, but we try and have some colour, some scent, some texture all year. I will get out and do some work in it again. I hope. It is healing - but hard work.

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  14. Dear EC
    Thank you very much for sharing and brightening up a cold day in the UK. Is the plant a Eucomis - Pineapple plant? Whatever it is, it's lovely!
    Best wishes
    Ellie

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    1. Ellie Foster: Thank you. As soon as you nudged me, I remembered. It is a pineapple lily. And there are more of them. Thriving.

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  15. Stunning - your begonias are just gorgeous!
    I agree with Ellie - I've always heard that plant called a pineapple flower.
    Happy Sunday, EC.

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    1. Alexia: The begonias are a joy. There are more of them too. Quite a lot more. Ellie was indeed right. And now I can't understand how the name escaped me... Happy Sunday to you too.

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  16. Those pictures are so pretty. If I had a yard I might plant more pretty flowers. Kinda hard to do living in an apartment.

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    1. Mary Kirkland: Welcome and thank you. The begonias are all in pots, so would be happy on a veranda. But yes, apartment planting is limited. Mind you, so is the weeding.

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  17. I chuckled when you struggled with the name of one flower. Had this been my post, I would probably have remembered the name of one flower and forgot the rest. In reality the name has little to do with how beautiful they are and you are a green thumb horticulturist, for sure. I have resorted to planting all perennials so I don't have to do much with them except cull them when they start overgrowing everything. I admire your gardening successes EC ... my father was a professor of Horticulture and I can barely keep an artificial plant alive ... hows that for failure, Ha!

    Andrea @ From The Sol

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    1. Andrea Priebe: There are some plants for which I have a decidedly brown (black) thumb. So I have stopped the massacre and no longer buy them and kill them. I was intensely frustrated to lose the name of the pineapple lily. I knew that I knew what it was - but it wouldn't come to me no matter how I racked what is left of my brains. Thankfully Ellie and River came to the rescue.
      And, I am a big fan of perennials myself. A big fan.

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  18. Look what I have to look forward to! Hibiscus for sure, and begonias in the blue pot. I need more begonias this year. You know I won't be the one to help you with the flower ID.

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    1. Joanne Noragon: Fortunately Ellie and River came to my rescue. It is another set and forget plant, and would probably do quite well with you too. And we always need more begonias. Lots more begonias.

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  19. Could I just plunk myself down in the middle of the garden and warm my bones? Please?

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    1. Jacquelineand... Of course. A bit of weeding while you are plunked in the garden is the only charge...

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  20. Everything there looks bright and cheery. Today our weather broke records for warm in February...but it won't last!

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    1. Bookie: It does look bright and cheery (in the parts I am willing to share). In other parts it looks overrun and weedy. Very, very weedy. I hope you get a little more warmth, Spring is on the way. Slowly.

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  21. Beautiful! I love it that some people have color now and are willing to share.

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    1. Teresa: I am more than happy to share (some of) my garden. And always like seeing yours. I do hope that blogger relents and allows you to post pictures again.

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  22. *sigh* tuberous begonias. One thing I will never be able to grow here, I just don't have enough shady areas where the air doesn't get hot. They're so beautiful. I love that plant you don't remember the name of, it looks familiar to me too.
    The only thing flowering in my patch right now are the marigolds. I'm tempted to let them take over the whole patch purely for the bright cheeriness.

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    1. River: Marigolds are indeed bright and cheerful. I do love a plant which thrives on minimal attention. I am grateful for the veranda to grow the begonias on too. When I first bought them himself was dubious. He is now as addicted as I am.

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  23. Just got back from google, definitely a pineapple lily aka Eucomis

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    1. River: Thanks to you and Ellie, I now have its name firmly in my head. Where I hope it stays.

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  24. Beautiful. I've had tuberous begonias for years. but the new place has no shade.

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    1. Sue in Italia/In the Land of Cancer: A new garden would be both exciting - and daunting. I am looking forward to seeing what you discover and create as the seasons evolve.

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  25. They are all gorgeous but I especially love the orangyness of the first begonia and the "escaped name" plant! :) You deserve all the beauty those flowers can put out and more. Hope your vim and vigor catch up with you soon.

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    1. River Fairchild: Vim and vigour have left the building. Gone out to lunch without me, leaving no forwarding address. Sigh.

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  26. I like the second and fourth flowers best. The 2nd is my favorite of all. I like plants that grow themselves, nothing else needed. That's the kind of garden I grow.

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    1. Strayer: I am a big fan of set and forget plants myself. Those begonias are among my favourites too. Himself really likes the orange ones and a red one which looks like a flame (which doesn't photograph well).

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  27. The colours! I do have a soft spot for begonias, the blooms are just so full and heavy. I'm glad your past work is tiding you over through this time. When I had eye surgery last July, I had JUST bought five dozen transplants. My husband (not a gardener) ended up planting them with me sitting giving instructions. He did quite a nice job - he used his tape measure and string and made those plants march in nice straight lines (which the placement called for) - I was so happy he tackled it! With your SP poorly, that option is out, so it's good that your plants are cooperating. The blooms are gorgeous.

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    1. jenny_o: When he is planting, the smaller portion is a big fan of straight lines too. A big, big fan. I go in afterwards and plant things behind, in front and between his lines. They are still there - but harder to see. A win for both of us. Five dozen transplants sounds like the sort of gardening insanity we are prone to - I am so glad yours had a happy ending.

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  28. Of course you deserve to be rewarded with such gloriously colourful floral gems - and growing so well in high summer too. They are beautiful.

    I used to have a few broms under a pine on our old country property - I would often find teeny tiny green frogs sitting in their watery centres. So cute.

    I hope your v&v returns to you soon, EC :)

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    Replies
    1. Vicki: Frogs in your bromeliads? Bliss. That would have been magic. A relationship made in heaven.

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  29. You have been lucky. What a gorgeous group of flowers! Hibiscus flowers remind me of someone very near and dear to my heart. I can see her dancing around, putting one behind her ear, lol. Your post made me smile. :)

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    1. mail4rosey: Luckier than I deserve. I love the thought of your hibiscus dancer - and can picture it. Thank you.

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  30. I love your blooms, and enjoy seeing these. Thanks



    ALOHA from Honolulu
    ComfortSpiral
    <3

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    Replies
    1. Cloudia: Thank you. If I get off my behind, there will be more blooms later. If not the couch grass will take over the garden - and possibly the suburb.

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    2. Damn blogger to the ninth circle of hell! (It keeps knocking me off the comment page)
      Trying, one last time, then I'll email...the pineapple lily is Eucomis.And the yellow begonia flashed some London memories for me as I had a stunning one in a pot on a strett-side window sill.Always somewhat surprised it never went walkabout!

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    3. dinahmow: Thank you. Ellie and River had already reminded me - and I don't know how I could have forgotten. And yes, I am surprised that your yellow begonia didn't grow legs.

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  31. Yikes! So many comments before mine. I'm sitting in the Amsterdam airport waiting for my gate to open so I can start the next leg of this arduous journey. Live all the beautiful begonias. More when I've got decent internet. :-)

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    1. DJan: I hope your trip is WONDERFUL. The smaller portion has been back to Turkey a couple of times - and loved it. I hope you get the opportunity for a big of sight-seeing as well as work.

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  32. Gosh, I can't stop drooling. Please please share some gardening tips? I need to get these sulky-susies to bloom!

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    1. Guyana-Gyal: Blood, sweat and tears fertilise my garden. Rather a lot of all three of them.

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  33. I love yoru closeups. It's as if the flowers put on their best expressions to be photographed by you! :-)

    Greetings from London.

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    1. A Cuban in London: Thank you. Their best faces are often very, very beautiful.

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  34. Your flowers are lovely. I am missing flowers quite a bit right now with all the snow we have and Spring still 7 weeks away. *sigh*

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    1. mshatch: We are never satisfied are we? I have been looking at photos of ice and snow on your side of the world in envy. Rather a lot of envy.

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  35. Coming from the winter-land of Minnesota I take so much pleasure in your lovely world. Speaking of pineapples, I'm sharing this really fun idea and it does work! I gave three as gifts for Easter last year and brought mine in from my greenhouse to winter in the bathroom for best sun and moisture! Here is the link you might really enjoy trying this yourself.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b0mhwAJM12U

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    1. Karen S.: My partner's mother (who lived in a warmer part of Oz) always grew her pineapple tops. They fruited too. Amazing. It is too cold here for them to fruit, but we have grown the tops anyway from time to time.

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    2. Wonderful, than you know of this. The first I heard of it I had to give it a try. We've had success so far too!

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  36. Such colourful gorgeousness. thank you, dearest. I'm waiting of photos of your kitties. xxxx

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    1. My Inner Chick: I hear you. I will feature the black demons again soon. Well one demon, and one sweetie. Both much loved.

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  37. Is the escaped-name plant perhaps an Allium (onion)?? Hope you find your energy soon.

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    1. Jesusan: We do have aliums, but the mystery plant (this time) was a pineapple lily (a econium).
      And yes, a return of energy would be very, very nice.

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  38. Love the colors of your flowers! Warm, beautiful, and, yes, a joy.

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    1. Kathleen Cassen Mickelson: We are lucky, and have colour for most of the year. Which is indeed a joy.

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  39. You have such beautiful flowers and the photos are awesome. Makes me wish for spring and the chance to plant flowers. But since I seem to have a black thumb, I usually don't have much luck keeping flowers alive much less blooming.

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    1. Mason Canyon: Spring will come. And my much longed for Autumn will come. And believe me, there are plants I cannot keep alive. Too many of them.

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  40. SO beautiful. This reminds me spring is just around the corner!

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    1. Stephanie Faris: Your Spring, our Autumn. Both will be very, very welcome.

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  41. A garden needs a lot of constant work - sometimes I also wish I could just let it go for a while. By then everything is overgrown and there's even more work.
    You hibiscus is lovely - a great color and a wonderful shape. All your flowers look beautiful. How rewarding a garden is. Just enjoy it!

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    Replies
    1. Carola Bartz: How right you are. The garden has got away from me, and there is a LOT of work ahead. When some at least of my energy returns. Or guilt gets me.
      And yes, gardens are rewarding. And heart balm.

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  42. If your flowers could speak they'd probably telll you to rest, relax, don't worry about them. They'll grow as best they can and they understand how busy and tired you've been. At least that's what I hear in the pictures.

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    1. Myrna R.: Some things are blooming and others in the garden are being suffocated by weeds. I really do need to get off my behind. Soon. I am very grateful for the hardy bloomers though. Very, very grateful.

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  43. You remind me that I need some Eucomis bulbs. My dad had lots in his garden and I loved them. I've never done the tuberous begonia thing, though think about it each year when I get a catalogue in the mail. Yours are gorgeous, EC. I think my garden is vying with yours for weeds...

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    1. Carol: Tuberous begonias are, like so many things in the garden, addictive. I bought two more than a decade ago. We now have more than twenty-two...
      Weeds? Oh yes. Murdering rather a lot of things I want to keep. Smothering them, suffocating them, strangling them and/or starving them. The garden can be a violent place.

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  44. I love your theme for today! I'm such a sucker for pretty flowers. I have terrible allergies, so being around lots of flowers in spring time usually leaves me watery-eyed. But photos, those are another story. I could look at flower photos all day long!

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    1. 2justByou: I am lucky. I have a number of allergies/sensitivities but they are for man-made things on the whole. Incense is always a risk, some candles and the like.
      I had a course of desensitising injections probably twenty years ago which allows me to enjoy the garden again.
      You may be sorry you said you can look at flower photos all day. I post a lot of them.

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  45. Fabulous begonias! Here they are considered a house-plant, not usually grown outdoors. Many years ago my mum visited a friend in Ballarat, and they have a wonderful begonia collection. Mum talked of it often.

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    1. lynners: There are begonia festivals in Ballarat and I would LOVE to see one. While we are in a colder part of Oz here, they do very nicely on our veranda. Just as well because I am not good with house plants.

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  46. They're so gorgeous, I can almost smell them. My favorites are the ones with petals that appear to have been outlined by a meticulous artist.

    Be well, EC. Thanks for the photos.

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    1. Rawknrobyn: My clutzy hands look at those petals in awe. They are incredible aren't they?

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  47. I love, love, love all these photos. Brilliantly dazzling!

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    1. Nas: Thank you - they are even more dazzling in reality.

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  48. Hopefully you can spur yourself into action in time for next Spring ;)

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    1. Michael D'Asotino: Well before Spring if I am to have a spring display. Soon in fact.

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  49. Those are gorgeous - that's your "slacking"? I've killed cacti before due to neglect.

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    1. Riot Kitty: Cacti can be quite temperamental. I have been slacking, but some at least of the garden survives.

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  50. Neglected? Nonsense! What your garden has left over is more than most start out with.

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    1. Geo.: Sadly neglected is true. Some left overs, very welcome left overs, and lots and lots and lots of work needed. As a gardener you will know how quickly a garden can get away...

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  51. I would love some of those flowers here!!

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    1. Tammy Theriault: Spring is not far away now. Really it isn't.

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  52. Buried under two and a half feet of snow, I thank you for reminding me what flowers look like, EC.

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    1. John Wiswell: I hope your doctor's appointment was a HUGE success. Two and a half feet of snow is incomprehensible. And would be a perfect excuse to not weed.

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  53. Sorry for missing some of your wonderful posts. I was kind of busy with my academic drills here.
    Your flowers are still greeting you with lots of smiles. I can see them happy of what owner has done to them.

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    1. dumcho wangdi: You are more than welcome whenever you can find time to drop in. I hope your studies are going really, really well.

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  54. Beautiful capture of magnificent colors :)

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  55. a beautiful garden... the camellias are in full bloom here.

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    1. sage: Our camellias are many months away - and if the corellas and the king parrots don't leave the bush alone flowers will be sparse.

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  56. Dear girl, just catching up with your flowering adventures. You plant and nurture just as your words do. I got a chuckle out of "come on autumn!" There is nothing that pleases me more about blogging than meeting friends from places I've never been and learning from them. thank you fellow elephant!

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    1. Susie@life-change-compost: Blogging is wonderful when it brings the world into our back yard isn't it? And there are some signs that Autumn is at least thinking about coming to visit... Bliss.

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  57. So many bloomers singing in your corner of the world.....what beautiful music you are making:) I love the soft colors and warm lines you painted for me today; thank you.
    -Jennifer

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    1. Jennifer Richardson: I always love the colours that you make dance for us. And would really, really like some of your gardening expertise (and energy) at the moment.

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  58. Love the begonias and all your other blooms. So nice to see a splash of color when I am surrounded by white snow everywhere outside. Your post makes me long for the spring and summer. Thanks for sharing!
    ~Jess

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    1. DMS (Jess): Summer? Take ours. Please. The only season I don't welcome.

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  59. My favorite have to be the orange ones. I think they fit the gold in the dragon cave. :) I would like to have more flowers in the dragon garden but it is mostly fruit trees. Not bad either. Dwarves are collecting black berries now. We'll have jelly, yummy. :)

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    1. Al Diaz: Black berries? Oh yum. Decidedly yum. I hope the dwarves leave you some. And fruit trees are always a joy.

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  60. What wonder you have! Awesome photos. "The next flower's name escapes me...." is my favorite.

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    1. Susan Kane: I love them too though my fickle self changed favourites with the wind. The mystery plant has been identified as a pineapple lily. I now, with the benefit of hindsight, wonder how I could have forgotten. And if that is all I forget I am doing well.

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  61. I hope for vim and vigor to return to you, my friend. Your flowers bloom on anyway - just for you, and we lucky viewers!

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    1. Lynn: Failing vim and vigour (which are still out to lunch) guilt is starting to stir me. Slowly.

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  62. Gorgeous blooms. Your photos make me antsy for spring to arrive.

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    1. Cherie Colyer: Your spring will arrive - and our autumn. Which I am longing for, probably as much as you are for spring.

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  63. It would appear that you ended up with flowerbeds full of independent souls, who do their best work unsupervised. Freelance flowers, perhaps! :-) So gorgeous! I can't see how even your most diligent TLC could have improved their beauty, though I'm sure they would have enjoyed your company and you would have benefitted from your annual garden therapy. But, nice to know your labors are mostly optional and not mandatory!

    Love the hibiscus and lily, but begonias are among my very favorites - and oh my, that brilliant orange color of the first one! It looks like sherbet, or a perfectly ripe apricot! **sigh**

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    1. Laloofah: Many of my freelance flowers are murderous thugs who are strangling the blooms I planted (and should have cherished). You are right though, the garden would have benefited - and so would I if I had spent more time in it.
      Begonias are a delight. An addictive delight. Their foliage is special and the blooms an added bonus.

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  64. I often feel envious when I see your gorgeous flowers in the midst of our winter. But then I think that I have them all to look forward too!

    So there.

    We must all learn to enjoy what we have.

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    1. Friko: Enjoy what we have, and enjoy what others have too. I often look at your garden in awe and wonder. And yes, a little envy, but more awe and wonder.

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  65. All are so beautiful. And so awesome to see while it's winter here.

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  66. I would be delighted to have such leftovers!! I've never had success with begonias even though a friend who belonged to a begonia society here in Perth tried to encourage me. I would dearly love to know the name of that 'forgotten name' plant if the name should come back to you.

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