Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Sunday, 17 January 2016

Sunday Selections #259

Sunday Selections was originally brought to us by Kim, of Frogpondsrock, as an ongoing meme where participants could post previously unused photos languishing in their files.
 
The meme is now continued by River at Drifting through life.  The rules are so simple as to be almost non-existent.  Post some photos under the title Sunday Selections and link back to River.  Clicking on any of the photos will make them embiggen.
 
Like River I usually run with a theme.  This week for something completely different I am returning to some of my obsessions.


We have had a fledgling galah visiting this week.  A whinging, complaining, fledgling galah.  He/she is perfectly well able to eat but complains at length to the adults.

The young ones have very much more muted colours than the adult (presumably as camouflage).

First the young 'un.





And now the much more vivid adult.



On Friday we were visited by a pair of Rainbow Lorikeets.  They are well away from their natural territory - but very welcome.





We have had some hot weather lately.  Too hot.  Much of the garden has baked, but the tiger lilies (and the weeds) are loving it.



The hoya which we picked up cheaply from the markets a few years ago because the owner was tired of waiting for it to flower is also doing well.

The blooms always remind me of cake decorations...






And the obligatory sunset.  And yes, mad woman with camera dances were involved.  




Next week an elderly uncle of the smaller portion is coming to stay with us.  I expect to be kept too busy to spend much time in the blogosphere so will be largely absent from Tuesday on for about ten days.  Have fun, and I will see you when I return.  Or if I can sneak a few moments to myself.

162 comments:

  1. Oh beautiful, the Parrots and flowers, excellent images.

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    1. Bob Bushell: Some day I will take a bird photo as well as you do. Perhaps.

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  2. Good God what I would do to have birds like that at my feeder. Weeds - can't kill them.

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    1. donna baker: We spend a LOT of time watching the birds. Each and every day.
      You are so right about the weeds. My father said 'if it grows well it is a weed'. He had a point.

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  3. Your wild birds are so much prettier than ours!!

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    1. fishducky: Many of our birds are pretty. Very few of them have pleasant voices.

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  4. Dear EC
    I really enjoy your flora and fauna photos. As fishducky says, you do have much prettier birds than ours. In our garden, you mostly see LBJs (Little Brown Jobs), which are usually sparrows, although we also get starlings, sometimes a blackbird and sometimes a robin.
    I hope your week won't be too busy - you need a rest too!
    Best wishes
    Ellie

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    1. Ellie Foster: Thank you. We have LBJs too. Though some of the LBJs are little black jobs. I expect the week to be very, very busy. Sigh. And will steal time where I can for recuperation.

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  5. These are incredible shots. So pretty. Thank you. Hug B

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    1. Button Thoughts: Thank you. Hug gratefully received - and returned.

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  6. Again, a lovely array of photos.

    Enjoy you time spent with your visitor...I'm sure a lot of interesting stories will be shared. Have a good week/10 days...I hope Jewel and Jazz's noses aren't put out of place...cuddles to them. :)

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    1. Lee: The visitor talks at, not with. Jazz n Jewel will retreat to the wardrobe for the duration. Coming out when the coast is clear.

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  7. still the fledgling galah is pretty cute. Cardinals (up to 5 males now) are so beautiful but their fledglings, not so much.

    I had a hoya carnosa years ago. Strictly indoor plant. I loved the little velvet flowers. Have fun with your visitor.

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    1. Sue in Italia/In the Land of Cancer: Fledgling birds are frequently gawky and less pretty than the adult. I love to see them though.

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  8. This has reminded me to poke around in the tangle of Petrea vine and see if the "hidden Hoya" is flowering.I may gone some time!

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    1. dinahmow: I hope you find a secret flower. Love the 'hidden Hoya' monnicker.

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  9. It is so hard for me to comprehend the great variety of birds you have around that are as colorful as rainbows! We have pretty birds here too but not like yours! Understand about missing our REAL life, ha-ha. Glad to know you will be back though.

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    1. Bookie: We are very lucky in the birds who visit, but other parts of Oz, and the world also get amazing birds.

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  10. You have tiger lilies my favourite flower, never work in my garden.
    Merle..........

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    1. Merlesworld: They are very happy here. I think they are blooming at the moment in three or four of our gardens. You grow some things I cannot manage too. Swings and roundabouts...

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  11. Hi EC,

    Those sunsets are lovely. I love a good sunset!

    :o)

    Cheers

    PM

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    1. Plastic Mancunian: So do I. Or a good dawn - which are mostly more subtle. Galah coloured rather than flames.

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  12. The soft colours of the juvenile galah are nice. "On Friday we were visited by a pair of Rainbow Lorikeets. They are well away from their natural territory - but very welcome." Be careful what you wish for. The have a very strong 'presence'. Btw, my sister is a hooded plover volunteer at her local beach and she linked on FB to a piece about protecting the birds, and there was a comment from you. Small world, I thought. Enjoy your time with your visitor.

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    1. Andrew: It is indeed a small world. I have been following the woman your sister linked to for quite a while. And yay for your sister's volunteer work. Such fragile creatures.
      The visitor is to be endured rather than enjoyed. Familial duty.

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  13. Gorgeous Lorikeets - they stand out amongst all your other lovely shots. The Hoya reminds me of my childhood - my mother had an enormous one which she trained at ceiling level all around our sunroom. It was beautiful when it flowered, but you had to be careful where you sat, because it would drip on you!

    Good luck - I like the comment about talks at, not with. We all know people like that, I guess.

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    1. Alexia: Sadly we do. Love your new resident.

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  14. The rainbow lorikeets are certainly a long way from home. And how lucky are you that they picked your garden to visit!

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    1. CountryMum: I think word gets about. We see them once or twice a year - and also the Superb Parrots. Do you get them?

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    2. I haven't spotted any of the Superb Parrots out here. They are generally found a little further east than us.

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  15. How pretty! If I lived with all those beautiful birds I am afraid that I would spend nearly all of my time watching them rather than doing anything productive. We have a lot of song birds that have beautiful voices but aren't particularly pretty birds. I can open a window and listen to them and still get something accomplished. If I want to.

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    1. Anne in the kitchen: We do spend a LOT of time watching the birds. For which I feel no guilt. Mostly they are not musical though. The whinging galah is a truly vile sound. And it goes on and on and on. A few years ago we saw an adult rap the whinger on the head. Blessed silence. We took extra food out for the adult.

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    2. hah! chuckling over this, EC :)

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  16. Our tiger lilies have the opposite problem. It is too wet and cold here. They are lovely when they bloom though.

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    1. Birdie: We grow rather a lot of lilies. The climate seems to suit them. Tiger lilies have the advantage that they don't assault delicate noses as the orientals (which I love) do.

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  17. Love the young galah, probably complaining because his parents are no longer feeding him. he'll just have to get used to doing for himself, much like human young ones do.
    The tiger lilies are beautiful and the hoya too. I'm hopeful the hoya I rescued from P's flat will do well, the broken piece in another pot may not survive, but the parent plant should. I wasn't going to repot it, but it is in a non-draining pot, so I'm going to have to. I've never thought of the flowers as cake decorations before but you're right, they do look like little sugar flowers.
    Love the sunsets.

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    1. River: I hope the rescued hoya does thrive. You are good with potted plants so I expect it will.

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  18. You know I love all your feathered friends. The lorikeets are really pretty, no matter what they act like. And I love your beautiful tiger lilies. Have a good little spot of vacation, dear EC. Just know I'll be smiling when I see you pop up again in my news feed. :-)

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  19. The babes can be so insecure as they make the transition to adulthood. Like us. Beautiful sunsets you have, and a lot of them. Have with the uncle, don't wear yourself down. Hope your weather cools some. I wish I could give you half the Oregon rainy days. I'm sick of them.

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    1. Strayer: We did have a few blissfully cooler days. Starting to heat up again from tomorrow, but it is summer after all. I suspect you are right about the insecure galah. Goodness they are noisy with it though.

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  20. And I get excited when I see our common cardinals. The Southern Hemisphere is a much more colorful place to live than where I am.

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    1. Starting Over, Accepting Changes - Maybe: Common cardinals? Not common at all. They are beautiful and I would be excited to see them. And rather a lot of other birds in your part of the world.

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  21. Rainbow Lorikeets! Tiger Lilies! So much fun - and then a dance in the golden sunset with you. Perfect to me

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    1. Cloudia: Thank you. I am so glad. You often give me rainbows, which are a slice of perfection.

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  22. We don't have such colourful birds as the Lorikeets and Galahs here, although we do have very pretty birds like cardinals, orioles, blue jays, red-winged blackbirds and Eastern blue birds. As a bonus, most... but by no means all... are songbirds or at the very least have a pleasant call. Tiger lilies are rampant here and are considered a weed by most; they love the damper soil and light shade to full sun of ditches and roadsides.

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    1. Jacquelineand...: You are making me feel quite envious. You have some glorious birds, and songsters with it... While some plants have happily moved to the ditches and roadsides here, the lilies aren't among them.

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  23. I envy your constant rotation of gorgeous bird visitors! The tiger lilies have always been a favorite of mine.
    Keep the strait jacket handy for whomever needs it during your enforced captivity. :)

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    1. River Fairchild: Having spent a lot of today cleaning/preparing, I think the strait jacket will fit me nicely. A padded jacket and a room to match has a lot of charm at the moment.

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  24. Just like teenagers everywhere (the young galah)... The hoya flowers are so different from anything I've seen - beautiful. And always good to see those twin trees.

    Try to take some time for yourself every day during the uncle's visit. Perhaps an afternoon nap would be a good habit to acquire. Nothing says you have to sleep, just disappear for a couple of hours behind a closed door. Easier said than done, I know, but I would be sorely tempted! Take care, dear friend.

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    1. jenny_o: I will try and squeeze some me time in. I suspect early mornings (very early) will be mine. And an afternoon nap has charm. I have said that I won't be doing the treks to the War Memorial. Hopefully I will stick to that.
      Hugs.

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  25. Lovely flowers and birds and skies. You're making me rethink my feelings about (some) birds.

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    1. Riot Kitty: I love them, but many of them come into the incontinent vandal category. You may be better off admiring them from the distance.

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  26. You can see parrots, wonderful.
    The first parrot is so cute.
    And you have outdoor big flowers which we have small and just inside in the pot.
    Wonderfully beautiful sunset. We can see sometimes the sun, but it is still low (or is behind the clouds), but the days will be longer every moment.
    Have a nice weekend.

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    1. orvokki: We are so lucky with our birds. I am not good with potted plants, so it is just as well that these grow happily outside.
      Have a wonderful weekend.

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  27. Hi EC,

    Those sunsets are magnificent! Enjoyed all the photos, but esp the skies. Have a great blog break.

    Best always,
    Nilanjana.

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    1. Nilanjana Bose: Thank you. I am a beauty addict - and often find it in the sky.

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  28. I have never seen a young Galah so that was nice. Love all your flowers adn your lovely sunset. Havea a good time with your elderly uncle.

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    1. Margaret Adamson: We are lucky. Lots of the birds that visit bring their young. The galahs have the most insistent whinge though.

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  29. More lovely birds! And flowers and sunsets too! But I love the birds most of all. Thank you for that mental health break.

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    1. Paper Chipmunk (aka Ellen): I use them for mental health too. And am very lucky that a lot of them visit...

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  30. Thank you for such warm and sunny images in a day of thick white fog in Middle England. It's so good to have a reminder that warmth and light may return one day.

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    1. Relatively Retiring: I have been looking at images from your side of the world for similar reasons. While I bake my brains out I am so glad to think that softer weather will come again.

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  31. Gorgeous sunset. A marked difference in the younger parrot to the older one.
    It's a wonder anything is surviving in the heat this summer..

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    1. Margaret-whiteangel: The young are very different aren't they? Recognisably the same species, but very different.

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  32. So many great pictures as usual. I love the hoya!! It's gorgeous. And apologies that I've not been around so often, I'm getting life together over here and it's keeping me very busy. :)

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    1. mail4rosey: Thank you. Apologies not necessary. Sometimes life gets in the way. As it should.

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  33. Hi EC .. the Galahs, the Lorikeets and then the flowers ... as Rosey says I love the hoya - how very pretty, and I see it has a wonderful rich scent ... well the sunset - we had snow this morning, now the sun's just popped out ...

    Cheers Hilary

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    1. Hilary Melton-Butcher: Snow? That sounds wonderful. And a bit of sunshine to shine on it even better.

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  34. Nice!
    I want pictures of the mad woman dancing now.

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    1. Alex J. Cavanaugh: You really, really don't want to see the mad woman dances. Burnt synapses would be the least of it.

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  35. Dancing woman with camera: I can see why with those sunset photos. Alas, my ATT LG Android tablet takes less than gorgeous photos, but . . . Sometime, I'd like to join this blog of "languishing photos." Have a good time with Uncle.

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    1. Patricia A. Laster: We would love you to join Sunday Selections - the more the merrier. My phone does have a camera, but it is smarter than I am. Though so is the dedicated one...

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  36. I always feel better after I visit you. Your pictures have a calming effect on me. My family has the opposite effect.
    Enjoy your visit!!!

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    1. Sonya Ann: My family too are just about guaranteed to send my blood pressure soaring. I NEED the peace of the outside world. My story and I am sticking to it.

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  37. Oh my, those blooms do remind me of cake decorations too. What lovely specimens they are. I wish that I could wait for a lovely incredible crew to fly in my yard too, but then I'd have to move away from the frozen tundra of Minnesota. Enjoy your special feathered friends and your warmth.

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    1. Karen S.: A frozen tundra sounds pretty good to me. Have fun playing in it.

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  38. These young people, galahs and all, I tell you! Always complaining!

    Those flowers, as children we called them 'icing flowers'.

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    1. neena maiya (guyana gyal): They do look like very skilled cake decorations don't they? Love them. Not only the young who are always complaining. Sometimes I am guilty too.

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  39. I love the white flowers with the little droplets coming off them! Those little details always get my attention.

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    1. Kathleen Cassen Mickelson: I was very pleased to capture the droplets too. I am definitely a detail person too.

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  40. They DO look like cake decorations! And lovely birds.

    You are my most faithful blog reader, I think, so I'll miss you! Enjoy your visit.

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    1. Lynn: Thank you. I will be back (as they say in the classics).

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  41. I would be hard to keep from biting into those delicious looking flowers!

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    1. Grannie Annie: Having seen them as confectionary it is hard to see them as anything else...

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  42. Always love to see the galahs, especially as I don't get to see young 'uns at all here on the mountain.

    The Hoya flowers do resemble pretty iced ones.
    Patience rewarded.
    I'll pretend they're dew drops from a cold, dewy night...

    And that sky. Always, your skies ♥

    Please take care in the heat in your coming busy days. Lots of cool showers, perhaps.
    xx



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    1. Vicki: The uncle in question is convinced that he is going to get pneumonia and that my city is ALWAYS freezing. I wonder whether he will realise he was wrong, or put it down to a temporary abberration. I am hoping to take it easy - and cool showers are always on the agenda. Thank you.

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  43. I have never seen either of these birds so it was a joy to meet them....and what a sunset to dance over. Enjoy your break....

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  44. you KNEW you'd get me with those twilight shots.

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    1. Author R. Mac Wheeler: It seems only fair. Your photos and books get me often enough.

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  45. Oh.. the birds to flowers to sunset. The images are simply beautiful.

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    1. dumcho wangdi: Thank you. It is a beautiful world.

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  46. Beautiful photos, like images explored in dreams.

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    1. Geo.: Thank you. Some days, life is but a dream...

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  47. I will have to find out more about Hoya. We have so many Rainbow Lorikeets here! ;)

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    1. Snoskred: You are relatively close to us, and the Rainbow Lorikeets are a rarity here. Love seeing them though.
      Hoyas are fascinating plants. Some of them have intriguing foliage too.

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  48. The galahs and lorikeets are so pretty! So much more vivid than the muted colours of our (still lovely!) British birds.

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    1. Claire: The skinny one's nephews were born in the UK. When they first came to Oz they loved the 'look' of our birds and hated their voices. Swings and roundabouts.

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  49. Glorious photos. Makes me feel like I'm on holiday in the sunshine :O)

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    1. Madelaine Sara: Welcome and thank you. There is no shortage of sun here at the moment. None.

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  50. I don't always comment (shame on me), but I so look forward to your photos on Sunday. They always make me smile. They're just so amazing.

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    1. Mason Canyon: What a lovely thing to say. Thank you.

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  51. Happy Birthday, EC. LOVE the pics. Enjoy your company.

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    1. Sandra Cox: Thank you. It was a quiet, but lovely birthday. Lots of domestic duty today before the uncle arrives tomorrow.

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  52. Oh My Goodness, What beautiful photos!I wish you a very Happy Birthday also!

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    1. Ginger Dawn Harman: Thank you - on both counts.

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  53. Oh, beautiful birds and blooms. I love galahs! Mighty fine sunset photos too!

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    1. Karen: I have just visited your post and drooled over your feathered visitors.

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  54. AMAZING.
    you live in a kind of paradise, don't you?!!
    I'm envious that we don't have birds like that!

    xxx

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    1. My Inner Chick: We are lucky - but there is beauty the world over. Hugs.

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  55. Love your darling birds, beautiful flowers and incredible sky.

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    1. DeniseinVA: Thank you. I am really enjoying your anniversary holiday posts.

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  56. hoya has a unique smell. i still remember ive had that plant in the room before i moved to biggest city; there were nights i havent fallen asleep cause of that smell.

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    1. Virginia: Welcome. Our hoya lives outside, so the smell isn't an issue. Any plant which stops you sleeping is less than desirable.

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  57. Replies
    1. Susan Kane: I thought it was the corellas you liked? Mind you, I like them all and my favourite changes. Often.

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  58. The birds are exquisite. We have a few pretty birds, but nothing like yours. It is 23 degrees here in Western NC and I imagine your warm weather is in full swing now. My landscape is dark, brown and gray, but the mountains around me are blue and topped with white. Love your blog.

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    1. Glenda Beall: Thank you, that is a lovely thing to say. We are in the nineties at the moment, and I am over it. If the truth be told, I was never into it. I love the thought of looking at mountains topped with snow.

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  59. G'day Sue,

    Such a colourful collection. I would be stunned to see such birds around here in the UK.

    Have a marvellous time with the elderly uncle of the smaller portion. I shall try to maintain the blogging world in your absence!

    Gary :)

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    1. klahanie: If the blogosphere is in your hands it is safe.

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  60. Loved the pictures of the birds and how much their colors brighten as they age.

    Those sunset pictures should be framed and hung on your wall. Stunning!

    Have fun with your visitor. :)
    ~Jess

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    1. DMS ~Jess: I love the birds too. All of them. And have folder after folder of pictures of the sky. Obsessional? Me? Yes.

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  61. What lovely colours in your world! Great shots.

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    1. ladyfi: I am loving your wintry beauty.

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  62. Marvelous I have a parrot and 70 fishes in the well . Planning to buy some love birds
    http://shilpachandrasekheran.blogspot.in/?m=1

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    1. Shilpa Chandrasekheran: Welcome. You have a well? That sounds wonderful to me.

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  63. hehehe i like the description of the young galah, bugging his (or her) parents for food. Baby birds are so demanding. I see the same thing going on here in the spring, but with our native birds who are nowhere near as colourful as the galahs, but just as entertaining!
    Thanks for the kind words about my paintings. They look 100% better when in a frame, and also they look better from a distance, don`t get too close!!

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    1. Shammickite: I really liked your paintings, and my non-painting self was really impressed. I hope the show goes well. Baby birds ARE demanding aren't they? Baby most things I suppose...

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  64. Your note about the blooms and the cake decorations is really curious :) They look pretty much similar. Old Galah has the wonderful colors.

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    1. Sophie: That adult galah is beautiful isn't it? We have a lot of dawns in those colours.

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  65. I agree they do look like cake decorations. Your photos are always so colourful whether they are birds, flowers or sunsets! Enjoy your break!

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    1. LL Cool Joe: There is a lot of colour in my world - for which I am grateful.

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  66. Thank you for your comment on my blog. Your photos are lovely, as are the surroundings. You are fortunate to live in such a beautiful place. I've left another comment for you at mine.

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    1. e: I saw your comment. Thank you. I hope you are in a gentler space now.

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    2. A work in progress, as always. Enjoy your weekend!

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    3. e: Life in progress is often hard, and frequently painful. Necessary if we are to have a life rather than an existence, but still...

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  67. I hope you're enjoying scenes like the above. That would lift anyone's spirits.
    Warm thoughts!

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    1. Rawknrobyn: Cool thoughts please. We have enough (more than) warmth at the moment. We are heading for a top of nearly 97F today.

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  68. You take such wonderful photographs! It's weird that the galah youngster is all faded. Doesn't look very camouflaged to me, but interesting! Man, that hoya flower is neat looking! I need to get me some flowers for my patio, but I don't know how they'll take the cross country move in a few months. Maybe I'll just wait til I get where I'm going. Anyway, have a nice day!

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    1. Madilyn Quinn: Our native trees are mostly grey/green and the young galah disappears against them. Where are you moving? Similar climate to where you are now?

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  69. Ah, that sunset! I totally go for sunsets, which is probably part of the reason we're content in Florida. The silhouettes in your shot are fabulous.

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    1. Crystal Collier: Thank you. Sunsets - or sunrises. I love them both. Those twin trees in silhouette feature in a LOT of my photos.

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  70. I hope you have a good time with your uncle. Enjoy your mini-break! :-)

    Greetings from London.

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    1. A Cuban in London: Thank you. Busy, busy, busy. And too hot.

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  71. Birds, flowers and sunsets - what could be better. I was a bit disconcerted to start with when I looked at your first image and thought the galah was on a chain, silly me. It's a gorgeous little one, thank you for dancing with your camera.

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    1. Kim: No, no chained birds here. Thankfully.

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  72. Love the galahs and baby magpies are just the same. They will be as big as their parents and able to feed themselves but will make such a racket to be fed.
    Love the hoya...ours has several flowers on it at present. It has been pot bound in the same pot for about 30 or more years now and thrives on it.
    The lorikeets are not so welcome here as they are not native to WA and take over from our native birds which have enough trouble with their habitat constantly being taken over for housing estates. I must admit though I think the lorikeets are lovely and they often visit our garden for bits and pieces.

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    1. Mimsie: The magpies have a reason. I learned that even though they are as large as their parents their beaks haven't 'hardened up'. Sooo, in our hot summers when the ground is baked hard they still want (and need) to be fed. Not certain what the galah's reasons are.

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  73. My you are having a wonderful or should I say beautiful summer ... hot though it may be, I would die to have such birds visit my garden or to be able to get a Hoya to bloom. I have a book for you ... "The Light We Cannot See" by Anthony Doerr. It wouldn't surprise me if you have read it already, but I just finished and it was an amazing WWII story. That said, I hope you have an enjoyable time with SP's Uncle. If he is mobile it is a good excuse to go on some excursions, right? Be well, EC ...

    Andrea @ From The Sol

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    1. Andrea Preibe: I haven't (yet) got to The Light We Cannot See. I have heard nothing but good about it - and will get to it.

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  74. this is just what I needed after braving the 20-degree weather outside. We're bracing for a blizzard, but I'll be thinking about your birds and flowers. Sigh.

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    1. Ms. CrankyPants: I will swap our weather in a heartbeat. It is just after six in the morning and I am already too hot. For a change (for us) the humidity is already high. Like 99% high. Bleah.

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  75. That tiger lily is gorgeous, and I totally see your cake decoration vision for the flowers that follow. They look sugar-crusted delicious.

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    1. John Wiswell: I wonder whether cake decorators have got inspiration from hoyas in the past...?

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  76. So amazing to be visited by these wild things with wings....flying flowers they seem:)
    It's cold and snowy and my toes feel like ice;
    it's joy to enter your warm world for a while:)
    Thanks for sharing the beauty,
    Jennifer

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    1. Jennifer Richardson: I do love the feathered enchantment. All of it. I would like some of your cold and snowy though. Swap?

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  77. Beautiful pictures and birds. I'm glad to be back in the blog world after a year's absence. Thanks for the comment.

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