Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Wednesday, 24 August 2016

A rare visitor

Very occasionally we get visited by Yellow-Tailed Black Cockatoos.  They are welcome visitors, despite being vandals.

Last week two of them dropped in.  We fired off plenty of less than stellar photos and himself got some much better video.  If you click on the photos and embiggen you will see just how big those beaks are.  They are big birds too.  This link will tell you a little more about them.





And some photos of the damage they did.  In a very short period of time.  Those beaks are powerful.



After an interminable time, the video has finally loaded.

 





148 comments:

  1. Upload the video to you tube, then download it from there to your site.
    The black/yellow cockies are wonderful. I've seen one fly over here shortly after moving in, but none since. I've seen red tailed blacks at the zoo, but mostly here I see flocks of corellas and sulphur crested cockatoos.

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    1. River: Thank you. It is downloading now, but will take a long time (nearly an hour).

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  2. That's okay, your photos are perfect! I especially like his little shy pose behind the tree limb! What playful sweet feathered friend you had for a visit!

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    1. Karen S.: It was lovely to see them, despite the damage they did.

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  3. I wondered if the YT Black Cockatoos were looking for bugs in the wood?That's what the Pilliated Woodpecker does. We had a dead plum tree in the backyard of our last house that they used to come and attack with their beaks.. .they are the larger of the redheads. Very nice.

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    1. D.G. Hudson: They were ripping the tree apart looking for bugs. I hope the tree is still alive and will come back in spring, but they did it no favours.

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  4. I didn't know there was such a thing as a black cockatiel. It's an elegant bird, and I enjoyed watching the video. Thank you, EC.

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    1. Rawknrobyn: A cockatoo rather than a cockatiel, and there are several different types. Beautiful things aren't they?

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  5. Little brat! The Sulphbur Cresteds wrecked our letter box and several rain gauges.Oh, and "pruned" just about everything in the garden. So far, the Red Tails up here have confined themselves to terminalia fruits...

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    1. dinahmow: Something is pruning my spring bulbs. The tulips and the anenomes. Not certain who the culprit is. Red-tails? A bird we never see.

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    2. WE don't see the yellows.Different climates, you see.And, no, I don't think I want to trade! Lately, we've had more Sulphurs around the street than usual.Not big flocks, but it's not usual to see 3 in a tree here.

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    3. dinahmow: We often have more than a dozen Sulphurs at a time. And on one morning there were over fifty festooned across the yard.

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    4. Yellow tails here in our Central Coast (NSW) garden, sometimes a couple of dozen of them. Luckily (so far) they have only torn up the big pine trees but I do love seeing and hearing them. The Sulphur Cresteds have only been appearing in our garden for a couple of years but they denude the orchard in minutes and I think they are a fixture now. I love them too, even though they are real brats, as Di says.

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    5. Carol: I would love to see a couple of dozen yellow-tails. Brat is kinder than I am feeling towards the sulphurs today. I have discovered that one of them is responsible for snapping the heads off my double daffodils (before they flower) and the anenomies. Sigh.

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  6. Wow . . . those are beautiful birds even though they can do some damage.

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    1. Lon Anderson: They are beautiful. And forgiven the damage.

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  7. Pretty birds and that beak is amazing. I hope your tree survives that onslaught.

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    1. DeniseinVA: I hope it does too. Time will tell.

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  8. We occasionally see black cockatoos, but I am not sure which type they are. They have very different call to the sulphur crested. I am pleased you persevered with the video.

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    1. Andrew: Their voices are different aren't they? Not musical precisely, but quite different to the sulphur-crested shriek.

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  9. Incredible birds with such strong beaks. Great video. Nice to hear your voice!

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  10. The good thing is that you don't have to hire and pay a tree trimmer.

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    1. Starting Over, Accepting Changes - Maybe: How right you are. Love your positive attitude.

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  11. Hi EC - such strong beaks as seen in the video - they certainly rip the tree quite easily ... fascinating to see your photos and the videos ... thanks - cheers Hilary

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    1. Hilary Melton-Butcher: They shredded parts of the tree with no effort at all. Fortunately they are truly beautiful birds and I hope that the tree will (mostly) recover.

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  12. OMGosh, aren't they something. Thanks for sharing.

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    1. Sandra Cox: Big, beautiful, destructive - and a marvel to see.

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  13. You shot a Yellow-Tailed Black Cockatoos, right on sister, and you made a video, so beautiful.

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  14. wow, lucky you to have them visit. I only ever see them flying by in pairs or small groups. I love their call and loopy flight. They might have saved your tree from borer. I have to wonder how they know the grubs are there.

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    1. Anna: Blessed blogger decided you were spam. We do have borers and like you I wonder how they knew? I don't think it is pot-luck. Hearing? Scent?

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    2. Yellow tails are known to have a more acute sense of hearing so it's possible they may "hear" grubs in the wood.Or, perhaps, feel the grubs'movement.
      More info here http://www.birdtricks.com/blog/a-birds-5-senses/ and here https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yellow-tailed_black_cockatoo

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    3. dinahmow: Thank you. Probably both - hearing and sensing the movement.

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  15. A great visitor to have and River is right about the video, download it on YouTube although it still takes a while as I wwell know with the many videos i take but you can do that a head of time, but keeo it private then and when you are making your post DON'T FORGET to make it PUBLIC then. If you need any help just give me a shout

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    1. Margaret Adamson: Thank you. I was surprised at how easy (though time consuming) it was.

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  16. They are such beautiful birds...and quite timid for birds so large. I love watching how they land. :)

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    1. Lee: They really are quite rare here. We see them two or three times a year. If that.

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  17. what a great bird I have seen it for thefirst time

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    1. Gosia k: We don't often see them either. Aren't they lovely?

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  18. Such beautiful birds, but after seeing the damage they can do in such a short time I'd have to say I'm glad they do just flying around here. Great video and lovely photos.

    Thoughts in Progress
    and MC Book Tours

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    1. Mason Canyon: They do wreak havoc but unlike their relatives the sulphur-crested cockatoos don't seem to do so for fun, or out of boredom. I think these were looking for wood grubs.

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  19. There are none of them in the wild here. They are interesting birds. We have crows, Hawks, and eagles here.
    I love watching birds.

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    1. Rick Watson: I am bird obsessed and spend a lot of time each day watching them. And marvelling.

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  20. My goodness - they are quite powerful, seems like.

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    1. Lynn: Very powerful. And beautiful with it.

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  21. Never heard of them before but now I am educated. Thanks for sharing

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    1. Sue in Italia/In the Land of Cancer: They are glorious things, but not I think widely known about.

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  22. They are destructive. And big at over two feet long.

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    1. Alex J. Cavanaugh: Yes on both counts.

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  23. I didnt even know they existed. You have edumacated me :) You are a treasure. I love finding new things.

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    1. Mad Cat Lady: I love finding new things too. What birds visit your area?

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  24. I have never thought about these birds being vandals, to me they're just beautiful and exotic =) But being clever, and curious, I'm sure they can use quite a lot of damage.

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    1. CrimsonAnna: They were hungry. And destructive. The white cockatoos are sometimes just destructive and fit the 'vandal' tag better.

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  25. Dear EC
    Sometimes I'm pleased that the biggest birds we have visiting our garden are pigeons! The cockatoos are lovely, but, as you say, what vandals!
    Best wishes
    Ellie

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    1. Ellie Foster: Despite my love of the garden I was happy to see them. Very happy.

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  26. Dina think I'm a little weird when I get excited over an unexpected guest at the feeders.

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    1. Author R. Mac Wheeler: She would think the same of us. We get very excited over the regular visitors and almost beside ourselves for the rarer joys.

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  27. We certainly don't get anyone like him up here and oh boy, I sure wouldn't want him to take a bite out of me! But he sure is cool :)

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    1. mshatch: Very, very cool. And no, I don't think a finger would survive any better than the tree. And probably not as well. Luckily a most unlikely scenario.

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  28. I would not want to get in the way of one of those beaks! Very powerful indeed. :-)

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    1. DJan: From the safety of the lounge we watched in awe.

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  29. Vandals indeed! It seems they have left the beginnings of their next meal, when the bugs do move in.

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    1. Joanne Noragon: I suspect you are right.

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  30. Gorgeous.
    Gorgeous.
    Gorgeous.
    Thank you for the video.
    What is he going to do w/ the bark?
    xxx WOW.

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    1. My Inner Chick: I am pretty certain they were ripping the bark away to get at grubs within. And wonder how they knew...
      Hugs.

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  31. We get black cockatoos up here at certain times of the year when they migrate too, but they have red tail feathers. That is so interesting to know that they are related but have those different markings. Our black cockatoos are so destructive. They literally strip some of their favourite trees of seed pods and leave a mess everywhere. Such is nature huh? CarolInCairns

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    1. Anonymous: Lovely to see you here. We never, ever see the red-tails. And I have no doubt that they can be destructive. Nature indeed.

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  32. Wow. Those beaks are powerful. I hope they never attack animals or humans. They are beautiful though. I enjoyed the video. Thanks.

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    1. Myrna R.: The only reason I can think that they would attack an animal or human is if they felt threatened. Which is understandable.

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  33. Replies
    1. Sonya Ann: Hugely impressive, and very skilled vandals.

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  34. I didn't even know there was such a thing as a black cockatoo! Despite feeling honored by the rare visit, I would have been hard pressed to stand back and watch my tree being chain sawed by that beak without waving a broom in his direction!

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    1. River Fairchild: Despite caring about that tree, it didn't occur to either of us to discourage them. Which says a lot about our avian obsession.

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  35. I didn't even know there were black cockatoos. I had an umbrella cockatoo for many years.

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    1. Jono: There are several different black cockatoos. And I had to google umbrella cockatoo. Learning all the time. Thank you.

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  36. What an incredible bird!! Why do they destroy the branches of the tree? Are they looking for insects?

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    1. Nicky HW: Looking for grubs within. And sadly, finding them on this tree. Borers.

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  37. Black kakadu..! I have always think the kakadus are colorful.

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    1. orvokki: Some of them much more colourful than others.

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  38. Wow! I wouldn't want to get bit by a beak like that!

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    1. Birdie: Unless you have woodworm, I am pretty sure you are safe.

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  39. Most fascinating and interesting looking birds. Great photos and video.

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  40. Thank you for bringing this rarity into my life

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    1. Martin Kloess: They are rare in our lives too. Aren't they incredible?

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  41. Good grief...they're like flying lumberjacks. Just look at them attack the branches.

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    1. only slightly confused: Welcome. I LOVE your description of them as flying lumberjacks.

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  42. You have such amazing & beautiful birds in OZ!!

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    1. fishducky: I like our birds, but there are beauties world wide.

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  43. Beautiful although really hard on your trees. Hug B

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    1. Buttons Thoughts: They need to live. And the borers they were hunting down are also hard on the trees.

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  44. Love that first shot and then that one where I see the eyeball. Great stuff.

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    1. The Happy Whisk: I hope they come back and I can take more (and better) photos.

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    2. I hope they come back for you as well.

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    3. The Happy Whisk: Not so far, but I live in hope.

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  45. Wow, that is so cool. (despite the damage). Great pics and video. We love seeing the flora and fauna in other parts of the world. Thanks for sharing!!

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    1. 1st Man: Thank you. Despite the damage we were very, very happy to see them. And awed. And I love seeing worldwide flora and fauna too.

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  46. It is nice to have the rare guest pop in every now and again. You sure get some beauties to come by!

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    1. mail4rosey: I prefer these visitors to any house-guest I have ever had. Call me unnatural but it is true.

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  47. I've never seen that type of cockatoo before. I can't decide if I like them or not but I think I might prefer my umbrellas.

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    1. Robert Bennett: I do like them, but love that they fly free. I only learned about the umbrella cockies today.

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  48. Those are beautiful cockatoos, Sue. It's always amazing to see them and to get such great photos. Thanks for sharing with us, and thanks for your WEP support!

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    1. Denise Covey: WEP was an education and a delight. Thank you and Yolanda for all the work you do in keeping it going.

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  49. They do look like vandals and I would not want a flock of them to land here. What are they after when they strip the trees? Are they eating the bark or do they want bugs? The video was great.

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    1. Granny Annie: In this case they were after borers, who are consuming that tree from the inside out. And vandals or not, I loved seeing them.

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  50. I adore YTBCs! We get them here too, once 77 flew over but it's usually much smaller family groups interested in pine cones and the water trough. Their call is one of my very favourite sounds, I hope they visit you more often (but do less damage than this time)

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    1. Kim: 77??? Wow, colour me jealous. We see flocks that big of the sulphur-crested and of short-beaked corellas but I have only ever seen these beauties in pairs.

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  51. That third picture is especially sweet. Looks like he is being coy:)

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    1. Sandra Cox: I suspect it was more a case of 'you can't see me ripping your tree apart'. I could though. And don't care.

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  52. Oh my gosh! I have never seen one of these before! And the video was extra special. What a wonderful place you have to live!

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    1. Ginger Dawn Harman: I am so grateful to live so close to nature.

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  53. EC, I just popped back to tell you that I saw the first signs of Spring this morning. Our gorgeous Torres pigeons that migrate to PNG in the Winter are back and filling their bellies on seeds from the palm trees. It was so exciting to see them return. I almost blogged about it, but had to go off to work and by the time I finished my third long day in a row talking to parents I was just too exhausted to blog. But seeing the pigeons return was probably one of the most exciting things I have felt. Gotta love that Nature!

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    1. carol in cairns: What a wonderful, wonderful sign of Spring. I can just imagine your smile. Talking to parents? You must be exhausted. Take care.

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  54. I agree with you about preferring these to human visitors! Even with the damage, they're much nicer to look at! And are less noisy than many people.....

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    1. Wally Jones: How nice to share my unnatural preference for birds over humans. Most of our birds are noisy. Some noisier than humans. And I don't care.

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  55. I continue to be amazed at the variety of wildlife you have nearby!

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    1. Riot Kitty: We are very grateful for it. Always.

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  56. They're brand new to me and l immediately thought of pirates! Hahahaha. Beautiful birds, well captured (so to speak) that woman! X

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    1. All Consuming: And like pirates, they take no prisoners...

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  57. What strong birds! And do I understand correctly that they are two feet long? That's pretty big when you add in that strong beak. The one in the video looked like he was using a crowbar on your tree.

    Thanks for persevering with the video - it really showed the strength of these guys.

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    1. jenny_o: You do indeed understand correctly. They are nearly two feet long, and that beak is at least as efficient as a crowbar. Powerful and beautiful birds.

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  58. I have yet to cast my eye on this bird although I have seen several others of the seven? varieties who have visited our garden mostly white variety. O A A Time I would take pics but seem to lack interest in most of my former pursuits. However, I do have, Michael Morcombe's book; 'FIELD GUIDE TO AUSTRALIAN BIRDS, for Guidance. About 850 species all told.
    Bet you didn't know I was a bird watcher, Too old for the other type.

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    1. Vest: I am not surprised that you enjoy watching birds. We have seen quite a number of the cockies too, and look forward to more. And we have several bird books which live in a convenient bookcase near the door.

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  59. WOW! looks beautiful. Good shot!

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    1. Weekend-Windup: Thank you. They are beautiful birds.

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  60. Do like cockatoos but they do do damage.....me in Bowen.

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    1. Margaret-whiteangel: They do, don't they. I hope Bowen is treating you well.

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  61. What a beautiful bird, but he sure did make short work out of that tree bark! I thought our woodpeckers were rough on trees, but they don't do nearly as much damage. The thing with our woodpeckers, though, is they don't just rat-a-tat on trees... they also like to tap on the rain gutters above our bedroom window, (pre-dawn, of course... who needs a rooster?) and one took a special liking to our fiberglass canoe. (Also in the wee hours of the morning.) Still, they're amazing birds, and it's always a joy to spot one of them. But YOU even took a video of that cockatoo! Bravo. :)

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    1. Susan: A number of our birds wake me well before sparrow fart already. The black cockatoos are relatively quiet in their destruction though.

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  62. The pictures are fabulous and I love the video. I can't get over those beaks and the damage they cause. Wow! Thanks for sharing. :)
    ~Jess

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    1. DMS ~ Jess: Those beaks are impressive aren't they? And despite the damage, I am very grateful to have seen them so close to home.

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  63. Hi Sue,

    And speaking of a rare visitor, hello from England! :)

    Thanks, I needed this distraction. Yellow-Tailed Black Cockatoos certainly cause some damage. Marvellous photos and thank you for this, Sue.

    Gary

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    1. klahanie: Dear Gary, it is lovely to see you. I hope life is treating you a little better.

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    2. Dear Sue, going through an unbelievable hassle. Just about to finally write a post about it. The situation keeps changing. Have a wonderful upcoming weekend and thanks, Sue.

      Gary

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    3. klahanie: Dear Gary, I am so sorry. Let me know if there is anything I can do.

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    4. Thanks, Sue, just knowing I'm getting support from decent folks like you is most comforting.

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  64. I went to the zoo this week and saw some red tailed cockatoos in the free flight bird show. I think it was the first time I have seen a black cockatoo in flight and close enough to get more than a glimpse of. They are indeed quite large and powerful and very beautiful

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    1. kylie: I have never seen the red-tails except in photos. We have some incredible birds don't we? Exotic and beautiful.

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  65. It is odd that the male bird in the main is far more attractive than the female. 99% of Rooster chooks or male Chickens wind up as roasters and the retired egg layers old boilers, hmm.

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    1. Vest: I suspect it has a perverse logic to it. The males are more attractive to attract mates, and the females travel under the radar so that they can raise their brood. Mind you, I could be wrong.

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  66. I was looking forward to seeing all the birds that I KNEW would be in Florida. So far, we've seen one mockingbird and I believe he must have died of heart failure.

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    1. lotta joy: You surprise me. I am sure they are there, perhaps just dazzled by your brilliance.

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  67. How lucky are you to have them visit!!!

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    1. CountryMum: That is what we think. Very, very lucky.

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