Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Wednesday, 3 August 2016

Tidbinbilla Nature Reserve

Last week we had a couple of sunny days and used them to go on outings.  The first was down to the lake to admire the water, the kangaroos and whatever else we could see.  We loved it.

The next day was also bright (but chilly) so we headed off again.  A little further away this time, to Tidbinbilla Nature Reserve which is about 40 kilometres (nearly 25 miles) away from us.  It is a lovely area which we don't visit often enough.  I had a yearning to see some emus so off we went.

I didn't see any emus, but we still had a lovely time.

As is usual, lots and lots of photos follow.

We were barely past the visitors' centre when we spotted a young (I think) kookaburra watching us at least as intently as we were watching it.  




 I think it is a very pretty area, even without bonus of the birds and wildlife...






 We first stopped at The Sanctuary, an area which has been protected with gates and electric fencing to keep out feral foxes, cats and dogs. 


This bird sculpture (which I love) is in the roof of a bird watching area.  I did wonder whether it scared some birds away...



Delicate pink fungi


Platypuses live in this pool.  And WE SAW THEM, even though they were quicker than my camera finger.




A brolga.

 A pelican


 And some detail from the fence to The Sanctuary.


The obligatory kangaroos - which were everywhere.  Including bounding out in front of us on the road after we left Tidbinbilla - which caused my heart to pound against my chest.  Fortunately himself was able to avoid it.




Loved this sign - despite not being a fan of snakes.


We didn't see emus and, being a complete klutz I rammed a stick into my toes and bled copiously, and it was still a lovely interlude.  And, since the emus were in hiding we have to perfect excuse to go back again.  Soon. 

129 comments:

  1. Wow it looks like a beautiful place. I love the detail of the butterflies on the fence.

    And ouch to the stick in your toes! Sounds painful.

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    1. LL Cool Joe: It is a beautiful place. We need to go there more often. The stick to the toes was painful - but self-induced.

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  2. What a beautiful place. I'd love to visit your country.

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    1. Rick Watson: Thank you. We live in a beautiful world don't we?

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  3. So beautiful there. I love all the photos, too. I would love to have the bird sculpture and the butterfly wall in my yard. So cool.

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    1. T. Powell Coltrin: I would happily make room for the bird sculpture and the butterfly wall myself. And rather a lot of the other art work. I like the boulders too.

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  4. I love the names in your country, like kookaburra and Tidbinbilla. They conjure up the unexpected.

    The young kookaburra has that fuzzy look of youth. Beautiful! Such a gorgeous place and nearby. A place to revisit for sure.

    I smiled at the snake sign. I saw a wild snake here for the first time recently. Ours are not poisonous however. I don't know if I could get out of the car in that area where the sign is located. Great post.

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    1. Marie Smith: Our local government acknowledges the Ngunnawal people as the original custodians of the Canberra region. Tidbinbilla is derived from the Ngunnawal word 'Jedbinbilla' - a place where boys were made men.
      The snake sign was a twist on the windy road signs we see more commonly. There are undoubtedly snakes in the area, though at this time of year they are asleep.

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    2. I didn't realize it was too cold for the snakes there this time of year. Interesting!

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    3. Marie Smith: The snakes are hunkered down for the winter, and will emerge again in a month or two.

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  5. What a wonderful place, perhaps a little hidden for the use of local people. I have heard the name of the place. It may be impolite for me to suggest that your photos have not always been of great quality and perhaps a case of the pot calling the kettle vermilion, but these are terrific photos and so crystal clear.

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    1. Andrew: It is a truly delightful place. And quite close to some other tourist venues like the Space Tracking Station. You have me worried about the photos though. Tell me when the quality slips. Please.

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  6. I love the baby kookaburra and the babbling brook; the bird sculpture is amazing, would look wonderful hanging over anyone's garden.
    I hope you see emus next time and I'm sorry to hear about your poor foot, is it feeling better yet? It sounds very painful.
    I've only just remembered to go to HBF for the words (*~*)

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    1. River: I am not certain the kookaburra was a baby - but he had the look. My foot is much better, and wouldn't have happened if I had a) been wearing closed shoes and b) been less of a klutz.

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  7. Hope your toes are better. The reserve looks like a wonderful place just to lose yourself for a day and relax. Love your photos, as always.

    Thoughts in Progress
    and MC Book Tours

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    1. Mason Canyon: Thank you. It is a very beautiful place. And incredibly peaceful.

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  8. It's truly a lovely place. Your mention of the kookaburra brought back a distant memory of a song that had the name in it, but it won't come back in full. What a beautiful place to visit! Hope your toe is all right. :-(

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    1. DJan: I suspect your song begins 'Kookaburra sits in the old gum tree, Merry, merry King of the bush is he...

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  9. Dear EC
    So that's a brolga - I wondered! I learned a song called 'The Drover's Dream' when I was at Primary School and it all came back to me when I read this post! Despite your injury and the lack of emus, it looks like a lovely place to visit.
    Thank you for sharing.
    Altogether now 'One night while droving sheep, my companions lay asleep, there were lots of stars across the southern sky...'
    Best wishes
    Ellie

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    1. Ellie Foster: The emus were there, just not where I saw them. This visit. There will be other visits - and it was lovely. And it would be really lovely to see the stars there...

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  10. Well, that looked like a lot of fun. Just the birds would do it for me.

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    1. donna baker: They did it for us too. Particularly the kookaburra. A little later we heard other members of his family laughing too.

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  11. What an adorable little bird! And platypuses! How cool!

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    1. mshatch: Wasn't the kookaburra gorgeous? And platypus always amaze me.

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  12. lovely photos. Love all your critters, but partial to your shots of that beautiful kookaburra.

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    1. Author R. Mac Wheeler: Thank you. We loved him too. And took many, many photos.

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  13. Hi EC - leave your stick behind for your next visit! That sort of thing is so frustrating ... hope whatever hurt heals quickly.

    What an amazing place and I love the name Tidbinbilla ... while I'd never heard of a brolga ... but I love the art works - cheers Hilary

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    1. Hilary Melton-Butcher: We love it too. And need to go there more regularly. I do appreciate the artwork, and think it is a lovely addition to an already beautiful place.

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  14. I remember when I was a child that my parents took to us to the Bronx Zoo to see the first platypus brought to the US. I couldn't have been more than 6 or 7 but I clearly recall watching this odd looking creature play around in the water. I have never seen one since. How fortunate you are to have such interesting wildlife with such funny names.

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    1. Starting Over, Accepting Changes - Maybe: Platypus are among the strangest of our wildlife, and we only see them rarely. And love them. It is a red letter day (with sparkles) for me when I do.

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  15. I've always wondered what a kookaburra was and what it looked like. Thank you.
    Sounds like a fun outing.....except your toe. Ouch!

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    1. Sandra Cox: It was a fun outing. Despite the toe. Which will heal.

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  16. You needed a time-stopper to catch the platypus, eh? Lovely views. Beautiful birds.

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    1. Crystal Collier: I definitely needed a time stopper. Or perhaps to gawk less and push the camera button more.

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  17. Great pictures! What a lovely place!

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    1. Sienna Smythe: Thank you. We love it there.

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  18. Looks like a lovely out on a sunny Winter's day.
    On a different note, I heard on the news headlines tonight that there are problems at the National arboretum with trees dying. It should be in your papers tomorrow.

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    1. carol in cairns: We have been hearing about problems at the Arboretum for a little while. Sadly it has been something that opposing parties are getting political mileage out of it, so I am not certain where the truth lies. Somewhere in the middle I suspect. I hope and trust that they will do their very best to ensure the health of the forests...

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  19. Picture perfect!!! I'm not a snake fan at all. I would have had a freakout if I saw that.

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    1. Sonya Ann: I am not good with snakes either, but some of the roads do twist just like that...

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  20. all of nature in balance, beautiful photos and love the butterfly piece, wonder about feral fox, I thought fox were wild ?

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    1. They were introduced for hunting and are feral

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    2. Linda Starr: kylie is right about the foxes. Like quite a lot of introduced species they thrive here, and do a lot of damage. Which is not their fault.

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  21. Beautiful place--I hope your toe woes end soon!!

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    1. fishducky: It is lovely. Really lovely.

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  22. I so much admire how you and your husband take off on little trips just to spend time with nature. I'm grateful too because you share such wonderful pictures. Surely, the emus will not hide from you next time, which I hope is soon.

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    1. Myrna R.: Both of us love the natural beauties around us, and it is definitely not a hardship to visit. Emus would have been nice, but Tidbinbilla is lovely anyway.

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  23. Fabulous young Kookaburra, and the rest of your pictures. Lovely scenery as well.

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    1. Bob Bushell: Thank you. Lovely, lovely place.

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  24. Ouch on the stick, that's so something I would do. Your young kookaburra looks rather bashful; very sweet. =)

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    1. The Cranky: I am the queen of klutzdom. And always have been.
      You are right, the kookaburra did look a bit bashful.

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  25. Beautiful area.
    So, are the cars to go thirty-five or the snakes?

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    1. Alex J. Cavanaugh: Or me if I come in close contact with the snakes?

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  26. Ouch! I'm sorry about your toes, but glad you still appreciated it all.
    I've heard of but never seen a kuckaburra. They're very cute and fuzzy looking.

    Take care of you and those toes.

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    1. Rawknrobyn: The kookaburras are cute and fuzzy looking. And skilled snake killers (and small birds too). Deceptive birds.

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  27. Amazing picture. Appreciate you sharing.(as I'm sure we all do.)

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  28. The picture of the kooka is the standout! but you knew that.

    It looks wonderful, I wouldn't mind going there some day.

    Sorry about the foot!

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    1. kylie: I hope that if you do get up here you will contact me. It really is lovely. You can stay there too (if you don't mind quite primitive conditions).

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  29. Platys? REALLY!? And kookaburra and OH MY! What an adventure you brought us today....Hope thy dear foot is just tootsy very soon. And a kanga bounding! and. . . I will dream of this I'm sure

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    1. Cloudia: I am so very glad to share my excitement.

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  30. Platypus and Kookaburra and kangaroos. You live in the most awesome place on the planet! Here is a question that I am am guessing will be no. Do males have the pouches? I mean, male mammals have nipples that don't have a use so I am wondering if male kangaroos have pouches. Probably not.

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    1. Birdie: No pouches for the males. It is the poor female who carries the joeys long after they have grown too big. Pouch potatoes.

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  31. Another wonderful tour thanks to you, EC. That bird sculpture is gorgeous, and so is the young kookaburra. And I learnt something - I didn't know that there were foxes in Aussie!!

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    1. Alexia: Foxes were introduced (for hunting) and are I think everywhere in mainland Australia. I beleive Tasmania is free of them.

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  32. Lots of woods around here yet not a kangaroo or platypus in sight! It seems unfair that all the cool animals are on one continent!

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    1. Anne in the kitchen: You have rather a lot of birds and animals on your continent I would love to see. It isn't one sided at all.

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  33. The kangaroos stand like sentinels. The brolga looks like a type of flightless bird, right? I dig that snake sign. It's important to have such signs as I have read of your country's numerous, poisonous snakes!

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    1. Bea: The brolgas do fly. They are also known as the Australian Crane. We do have lots of snakes, but that sign was about road conditions not reptiles.

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  34. What a lovely day out and it always good to have an excude to go to such a grea area. Loved seeing all the animals and birds you shots but the reflection and colour of that lake is superb.

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    1. Margaret Adamson: Each time we go to Tidbinbilla we tell ourselves not to leave it so long between visits. It is such a beautiful - and varied area.

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  35. Thank you so much for allowing me to accompany you on a wonderful day's outing (less the your poor damaged foot of course..hope it is better now).
    Loved that fence and, like you, I wonder if the bird sculpture would frighten timid birds away.
    I have often wondered that the plural for platypus is platypuses and decided I'd check to see if there is any other plural. It seems playpi is used colloquially but it is technically incorrect and a form of pseudo-Latin. The correct Greek plural would be "platypodes" which I don't think much of so I guess we will just stick with platypuses as we always have but then here in the West they are not often mentioned in conversation as we have non. lol
    Those rocks look exactly like those we have on the south coast around Albany and other areas. At some time there has been a lot of tumbling of mighty stones taking place in our land.

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    1. Mimise: I did know about platypodes (a blogger educated me) but it doesn't roll off the tongue and I don't use it. I take photos of the mighty boulders often. Beautiful (albeit sometimes dangerous) things.

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  36. Oh my oh my it is all so wonderful. Sculptures and scenery unbelievable. I am jealous that you were there.

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    1. Granny Annie: I am so glad that you enjoyed coming along.

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  37. Sorry you didn't get to see any emus- but what a fantastic visit you had! Beautiful scenery! I can't believe you got to see a platypus! And that kookaburra is adorable. Love these pictures! :)
    ~Jess

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    1. DMS ~ Jess: Platypus sightings are a rare treat for us too. And we hear the kookaburras much more often that we see them.

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  38. YOWZERS!!! What stunning photos!!! I've never seen nor heard of a brolga... I love the kookaburras!! You've made my morning!

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    1. Nickey HW: When you finally get here we can add Tidbinbilla to the list of places to go. I think that you and the boys would love it.

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  39. I love emus. Too bad they were hiding from you. The shots of the area reminded me very much of the terrain in east San Diego county, where I grew up. It's probably full of houses now.
    I would be terrified of running into a kangaroo out on the road. In the past I've had the same scares with deer.
    The kookaburra is priceless! :)

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    1. River Fairchild: Dawn and dusk are the most dangerous times for roos on the road. This was very, very early for such a heart thudding moment. I hope this area is never built out.

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  40. Thrills, chills, and spills (well, ramming sticks into toes, but that doesn't rhyme) - you had it all in this visit. That kookaburra is beautiful, as is the terrain. I've had the same driving fright with deer; you have my sympathy. And I hope your toe is okay. The thought of a stick in a toe makes me cringe. You've been losing too much blood lately, between Jazz and nature! Thank you for sharing your outing with us.

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    1. jenny_o: Much too much blood has been shed. Sigh. And that driving fright gets your heart going doesn't it? For miles. I sometimes wonder whether the critter who causes it recovers more quickly.

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  41. Sounds like a wonderful outing even without the emus. I hope your toes have stopped bleeding.

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    1. Jono: The emus will be there (or will be visible) another day. It would have been greedy to complain too loudly. And the toes have mostly stopped bleeding - except when I bump them.

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  42. What a delightful excursion (except for bleeding profusely) ... all of it is beautiful from the natural to the art work. Glad it is protected by electric fences ... always nice to have a safe place :)

    Andrea @ From The Sol

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    1. Andrea Priebe: Not all of the reserve is behind the electric fences, but the brolgas and platypuses are. Mind you, I suspect the platypus would be safe without them. The water and their poison spurs would see to that.

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  43. It is a pretty area. How's the toes?

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    1. Sandra Cox: The toes are improving, thanks.

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  44. I love the kookaburra - what a wonderful bird! It reminds me of our kingfisher. This are indeed is beautiful. Can you believe that it looks a bit where I live? I first thought that when I saw the eucalyptus trees. We have lots of them as well, and while they're very messy trees I love their scent. And those kangaroos - what is not to love about them?

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    1. Carola Bartz: Kookaburras are related to kingfishers I believe, and are very beautiful indeed. How fascinating to learn that Tidbinbilla looks a bit like home to you. I love it there, and think it is very, very beautiful.

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  45. A great array of photos. I love kookas. Mine still come here every afternoon for their the meat scraps from when I've cut up Remy and Shama's dinner. My family of birds arrive each afternoon like clockwork.

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    1. Lee: While we get an army of avian visitors each day, kookas aren't among them. I envy you yours.

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    1. Vest: Indeed there are. And you will find them here

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  47. Nice photos and looks like a lovely place. So nice to see animals and birds in their natural environment.

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    1. Rasma Raisters: It is a lovely space - and a safe one for the animal inhabitants.

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  48. Words for this Friday are as follows.

    COVERT.
    BOLT.
    TEMPTING.
    WANDER.
    SWEET.
    FAMILIAR.
    My composition follows, ' Memories when a child of nine during the thirties in merry England '..

    When I was a child I would WANDER around the FAMILIAR local countryside and into the woods or COVERT as was the local term . These woods would play host to many forms of flora and fauna which had survived the ravages of urbanisation and development. I came well prepared with my box of sandwiches and my towel and outer clothing hoisted above my head as I waded into the chilly water hoping there were no hungry fish seeking a juicy meal of a large worm. On dry land I dressed and went foraging for hazel nuts which normally would be in abundance at that time of the year, however my arrival created much ado and scurrying from the colony of Red Squirrels who would BOLT to take cover up the trees faster than the eye could follow them.
    Having found one tree which unfortunately had been harvested I knew my search for those SWEET TEMPTING nuts was going to be a futile exercise and I assumed that if one tree was laid bare the others would be too and the fruit of the Squirrels labour stored away out of sight for the Squirrels winter hibernation and. It was nice to know those pesky Grey American squirrels had not found and destroyed this colony of local Reds, this was due to their habitat being completely surrounded by water .leaving them totally isolated.
    Chalgrove Oxford ENG !935.

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    1. Vest: I love it. Are you going to post it on Hannah's site too?

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  49. I loved the kookaburras when I was in Australia a couple of years ago. We went to Healsville where they do wonderful work and watched some minor surgery being carried out on a young kangaroo. Thanks for this lovely post!
    CLICK HERE for Bazza’s fabulous Blog ‘To Discover Ice’

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    1. bazza: Welcome and thank you. Kookaburras and kangas are both delightful - and always make me smile. What sort of surgery did you see?

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  50. Such lovely birds and pretty scenes.

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    1. Lady Fi: It is a delightful place, which we need to visit more often.

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  51. Estupendas imágenes..muy bonita...un saludo desde Murcia....

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  52. Estupendas imágenes..muy bonita...un saludo desde Murcia....

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    1. alp: Thank you. It is a really pretty place and I am glad you liked it.

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  53. Those definitely are some beautiful scenes.

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    1. Dark Witch: It is a dramatic and beautiful place and I am so glad that the scars from the 2003 firestorm are largely gone.

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  54. What a fantabulous outing!

    Personally, I think it's a good thing you didn't spot any emus this time around. Gives you a more than valid excuse to go back!

    As soon as I saw that first picture, a song we learned about the kookaburra in elementary song popped into my head. (And now, it won't get OUT!)

    I'm thrilled you got to see a platypus in person. Seeing one of them is high on my list of things I'd like to do before I kick the bucket.

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    1. Susan: I felt like that about the invisible emus too. It gives us the perfect excuse to return. There are koalas too...

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  55. We sang that same song about the kookaburra in an old gum tree not knowing what one looked like. Thanks to you, I do.

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    1. Sue in Italia/In the Land of Cancer: I hadn't realised that song had travelled so widely. Their laugh is special too. I always smile when I hear it.

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  56. I love the snake road sign. Round here it would just mean ‘wriggly road to follow’.

    A couple of lovely days out, and excursion like that make days at home with nothing much happening less monotonous.

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    1. Friko: It does mean wiggly road to follow, but was updated to reflect the area. Which I thought was clever.
      Mostly I am happy to remain at home, but both outings were a treat.

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  57. I have number 5 up as desktop wallpaper, takes me right into the sunny bush without worrying about the wildlife like snakes etc.

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    1. JahTeh: What a lovely thing to say. If you want copies of any of the others let me know. I am not good on snakes either.

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  58. Yikes about your toe. Lovely photos.

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    1. The Happy Whisk: Thank you. I am clumsy. I usually have an injury or two. Toe is healing. Bruised thighs (as usual) and cut fingers now.

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  59. I saw an emu, lots of roos and heard the kookaburra laugh. That laugh is the best.

    What a lovely place! I hope you go again. I always feel great in places like that. Better than cities.

    eek eek your toe. Sneakers are good for protection. Which reminds me, I need to buy a pair.

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    1. neena maiya (guyana gyal): That laugh is wonderful isn't it? And we will be back. And hopefully won't leave as long between visits.

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  60. Looks like a lovely area. I'm not a snake fan either. Here at least most of our snakes are not poisonous, only the rattle snake. I think I'd worry about walking about in the woods and brush there.

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    1. Strayer: It is a lovely area. The snakes are as anxious to avoid us as we are them. Yes, we have quite a lot of poisonous snakes but I suspect less than five people (if that) a year die after a snake bite. And many more snakes die after human action.

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  61. The kookaburra is a little charmer, adorable as are the roos. Great place, great sculptures and birds, love the look of this area. Thanks for stopping by and leaving another sweet comment. We are getting there :)

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    1. DeniseinVA: The kookaburra melted our hearts. I am glad that you are slowly getting to a better place (knowing that you will always miss Gulley).

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  62. That little kookaburra is the cutest thing ever. The other pictures are lovely but I love that bird.

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    1. Kathleen Valentine: We love them too. We quite often hear them, but it had been too long since we had seen one.

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  63. Oh my goodness, what a wonderful adventure you have right there. Beautiful stunning photos and critters as well. I especially like the sign at the end of your post, no words necessary!

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    1. Karen S.: Isn't it a lovely area? I was tickled by that sign too - and the road did twist and turn like a snake.

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