Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Sunday, 7 May 2017

Sunday Selections #326

Sunday Selections was originally brought to us by Kim, of Frogpondsrock, as an ongoing meme where participants could post previously unused photos languishing in their files.
 
The meme is now continued by River at Drifting through life.  The rules are so simple as to be almost non-existent.  Post some photos under the title Sunday Selections and link back to River.  Clicking on any of the photos will make them embiggen.
 
Like River I usually run with a theme.  This week I am returning (you will be shocked and surprised to hear) to my avian obsession.  And this week I am focusing on noisy birds.


Starting with a new visitor to us.  Noisy miners.  They are from the honeyeater family, native to Australia and apparently endemic to a lot of eastern Australia.  They too have discovered the joys of green apples and are becoming regular visitors.  I think they are pretty.  They can be 'talkative' too, but we have many, many noisier (and less musical) birds.  This is their call.





Then to a long-billed corella, a bird I often feature.  Or to be more accurate, to a young long-billed corella.  This one visits often and we know it is here because if whinges constantly.  Loudly.  This is call of the little corella which is very similar to that of the long-billed, and the youngsters 'feed me, feed me' complaints are worse.   They go on and on and on.  And on.  A few years ago we saw an adult firmly rap a complaining youngster on the top of its head.  It shut up.  And inside, we cheered.







  The youngster can fly, and can feed itself.  It does both.  However if there is an adult around it prefers to chase after it and complain.  As you can see it isn't precisely 'undernourished'.  If you look at the third picture in the series you can see it beside a much slimmer adult.  

Noisy, incontinent, destructive vandals.  And we welcome them. 

130 comments:

  1. wow great and fantastic birds my favourite are white ones

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    1. Gosia k: Thank you. We like them too.

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  2. I love the birds, Miners and Corellas, I love the the last two, fantastic.

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    1. Bob Bushell: The birds are lovely. Their sound-track less so.

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  3. Haha the shots with the mouth wide open say it all! I can almost hear them from here! Still, very beautiful.

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    1. LL Cool Joe: They are so noisy I wouldn't be at all surprised if you COULD hear them.

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  4. I love these birds, thanks for sharing because they are something I can't see here in North. The white one is very beautiful.
    Have a nice weekend.

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    1. orvokki: You get marvels we don't see as well. I am so grateful to the blogosphere for shrinking my world. I hope your weekend is lovely.

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  5. Those corellas are huge, EC. A flock of them would be annoying but welcome too.

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    1. Marie Smith: The corellas aren't as big as our cockatoos - but at least as noisy. And you are so right about the annoying/welcome conundrum.

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  6. Well, I hope the Noisy Mickeys (a term for those newcomers) don't get out of hand.Further north, they bred in boggling numbers and, in some places, drove out smaller natives.Our local Red-backed wrens dropped off alarmingly when the miners built up.

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    1. dinahmow: I think the numbers here are largely contained. Mind you, an ignorant politician called for them to be exported to their country of origin last year. I suspect they had been disturbing her precious sleep. She denied them being native for a while (thinking of the Indian Mynah I suspect) and then went quiet.

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  7. Never heard of the miners but they do look pretty

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    1. Sue In Italia/In the Land of Cancer: They are pretty, and I particularly like the yellow feathers around their eyes.

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  8. I had to laugh at the thought of the adult rapping the youngster in the head to get it to shut up. :) Thanks for the sound bites. I don't see those kinds of birds around here. We have some loud ones but I don't know which is doing what talking.

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    1. River Fairchild: We laughed too. It was a very firm rap. And the ensueing silence blissful.

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  9. You have such beautiful birds in Australia!!

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    1. fishducky: We do, and some of them are musical as well.

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  10. Birds certainly are bossy! I know mine around here are...and very vocal when going about their business or when trying to grab my attention. Between being bossed around by my two furry mates, Remy and Shama and the birds...I don't stand a chance. My life is not my own!!

    Have yourself a wonderful week, EC. Cuddles to Jazz. :)

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    1. Lee: Snap. The birds and the cats rule.

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  11. Ha. I am a bird lover Child, so I welcome all too. Wish we had the variety you have down under.

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    1. donna baker: Your country gets some birds I long to see.

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  12. Sometimes I hear the birds, sometimes they are just part of my surroundings. There is none who's sound I don't enjoy when I hear it, whether cooing or bickering.

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    1. Joanne Noragon: Even our non-musical birds often sound better than people and machinery. Usually sound better than people and machinery.

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  13. With so many birds around you, do you get woken up really early? The birds start here at about 4:30 a.m. and go right on through until dark. Yes. They wake me up!

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    1. Birdie: Yes. The wattle birds start well before dawn. And have an asthmatic cough as their call.

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  14. I love the birdlife that we have on farm. We are very blessed. I did have a chuckle at your description of the feed habits of the young corellas! They are very noisy!

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    1. CountryMum: It is a privilege to see, to hear, and to feed them.

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  15. I love the fact that they are "Noisy, incontinent, destructive vandals", but you still enjoy them - and take great pictures of them! The miners are interesting; I haven't seen them before. What a strange yellow patch they have behind their eyes.

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    1. Alexia: That yellow patch is feathers. And I agree, it does look odd. Stylish, but odd.
      We sweep every day (often several times) and scrub the veranda at least once a week. An hour later it needs doing again. They rip apart the trees. Pick (and discard) flowers. And yes, I love them.

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  16. Baby birds of any species are unbelievably demanding and, yes, loud.

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    1. only slightly confused: Very loud. Very persistent. And (when they have feathers) very cute.

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  17. Thank you for these great shots. You would love my backyrd. We get some amazing visitors.

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    1. Martin Kloess: I am sure I would love your backyard. Your country has some birds I would LOVE to see. Rather a lot of them.

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  18. Those are very pretty birds but the Corella sure is loud. I hope they aren't early risers.

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    1. Starting Over, Accepting Changes - Maybe: They ARE early risers, and are often at our feeders just before first light. With the cockatoos - who sing a very similar song.

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  19. I always love your bird photos and these are wonderful...We put up with a lot for beauty in some places but the creatures of the world put up with a lot from us as well. Hugs!

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    1. e: I get infinitely more from the birds than they get from me. You are so right about the impact we have on other species. Rarely positive impact.
      Hugs gratefully received and returned.

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  20. I love the birds eating apples! How sweet! Must be nice to have around. Here our wrens sing of spring and dry weather finally!

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    1. Bookie: Quite a lot of the birds which visit us enjoy apple. For some reason green apples are preferred - and are now a staple on our shopping list.

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    2. I buy green apples in the winter, but the birds don't get a single one, they all go into apple pies and apple&rhubarb crumble :D

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  21. The miners are very pretty, aren't they? And those corellas really do have squawky voices! How funny to see an adult discipline a juvenile - I expect that's not something many people have had the privilege of seeing.

    Birds will be birds, and if we can't change their less lovely habits, we might as well enjoy them :)

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    1. jenny_o: It was incredible to watch the discipline. It was quick, it was firm, it was effective.
      I suspect that birds have fewer less lovely habits than many people. I enjoy them more anyway...

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  22. What an unusual bird call. The white ones are so pretty. Yes healthy looking the young one :)

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    1. Kim@stuffcould...: Quite a lot of our native birds are screachers rather than singers. I suspect that youngster gets the best of whatever food is available, despite its complaints to the contrary.

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  23. I loved watching that garden filled with Corellas. I've heard a few flocks flying overhead again recently, after many months of not hearing a single one. They're gone again now, no sound for almost a week :( I've heard nothing but a wattle bird on a daily basis until yesterday and again this morning I heard that wonderful song from a magpie. I love that sound so much.

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    1. River: We have the corellas all year. I so agree with you about magpie song. It is a glorious sound and spells home to me.

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  24. Hi EC - looks like the youngster should really have a bath, wash its hair, brush and comb itself ... and then get dressed being tarted up neatly and tidily ready for the day - I think a tweet to said adult to give its youngster another gentle tap on the head to leave the nest!!

    Seagulls here can cause the noise level to rise rather more often than I'd like ... in fact one splat on me at the bus stop in town the other day! Can't say I was impressed, though it's meant to bring good luck - I wait patiently!

    Cheers and have a good week - Hilary

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    1. Hilary Melton-Butcher: I was hit quite recently, though I think the bomber was a cockatoo. Years back I watched one carefully aim at a cat looking up at it. The cat was appalled and shot inside and hid under the bed.
      I hope both of us are blessed with good luck soon.

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  25. I always enjoy your birds. The miners and the long-billed corella are darling. Thank you for the links to their calls, very interesting. Photos are wonderful.

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    1. Denise inVA: Thank you. Birds have become a bit of an obsession.

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  26. Who doesn't love a large white whiny well-nourished vandal? Goes without saying :)

    Amazing photos as usual, and thanks for the links to the songs/calls. Lovely!

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    1. Nilanjana Bose: Perfect comment. I just read it out to my partner and we are both smiling. And yes, we do love them.

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  27. I love these, EC. Wonderful! And Natasha the cat sure liked the links to the birdies' calls! I wish you could have seen her staring at the laptop!

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    1. Ellen the Chipmunk: Jazz was intersted in the bird calls too. Of course. Lovely to see you, and I hope your world is treating you kindly.

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  28. I love birds. We have floor to ceiling windows in our livroom and feeders placed outside so that we can watch then while we drink our coffee. We spend a small fortune on bird seed but it's a small price to pay for the joy we get in return.
    R

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    1. Rick Watson: We buy our seed in twenty kilo bags these days, and replenish it often. And we get through dozens of apples a week too. As you say - a small price. And one that we pay happily.

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  29. Lovely birds. Makes me think I should study the birds native to my area more. Great photos.

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    1. Mason Canyon: Be warned. Studying the birds can quickly become addictive. Very addictive.

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  30. Funny humans aren't the only ones who bob their kids on the head.

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    1. Alex J. Cavanaugh: I think human parents could learn from rather a lot of other species. There was no shouting, no empty threats. The adult reached over, rapped the youngster firmly on the head and quiet reigned.

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  31. Love your final line, Dear :) LOUD!

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  32. Oh the minor is lovely and love hearing their calls, isn't the internet wonderful for knowledge, the first photo of the plump youngster with his beak open should be framed, it is lovely, almost a painting or botanical illustration

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    1. Linda Starr: Thank you. The corella didn't shut its mouth. At all. And continued to complain until it flew away.

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  33. All that comes to mind: that corella is kind of an asshole. haha

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    1. Robert Bennett: Which corella were you thinking of? The whinging youngster or the adult who gave it a lesson?

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  34. I've always loved watching birds in the various places we've lived. Our driveway in Alabama was a flight school for baby birds. We'd watch their tentative efforts, their inevitable early crashes and equally inevitable, eventual successes. Our kitchen in Belgium had two window walls and I never tired of watching mother birds feeding babies twice their size - though the scrawny mothers often looked exhausted from the demands of their children! They always knew though when enough was enough, time to kick junior out of the nest and let him find his own worms.I used to wish I had such innate, unerring instincts!

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    1. Molly Bon: The parents often do look tired don't they? Something I suspect is true of most parents whatever the species. Or at least for any parent which doesn't lay eggs and walk/fly away...

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  35. Them youngsters just don't appreciate the work to put food on the table.

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    1. Author R. Mac Wheeler: That particular youngster just didn't want to put in the effort for itself.

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  36. Ha, the noisy ones look to have cartoon eyes! Pretty wee things, and the youngster is a cutie too. I envy you those birds, not so much the droppings hahahaha.

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    1. All Consuming: The droppings are the price (one of the prices) we pay. Mind you, some of the birds obviously consume glue somewhere. Some of the droppings are very, very hard to shift. Lots of scrubbing, lots of elbow grease.

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  37. Your last line is so funny! Love it!

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    1. Strayer: It probably says a lot about us that we do welcome the noisy incontinent vandals. And cater to their preferences too.

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  38. Baby birds can be quite noisy when hungry. I think the young one will slim down when it starts taking longer flights. I so enjoy these photos.

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    1. Truedessa: I suspect that learning to fly is an energy intense activity. The young birds probably need all the calories they can get. I am glad you enjoy the photos.

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  39. Just the way it is supposed to be.

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    1. Susan Kane: You have lost me a little here. What is the way it should be?

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  40. I don't know the names of very many birds. I do love to go outside to listen to them. I consider their sounds a song regardless of how raspy or repetitive they are. We don't have such a wide variety here, I don't think. Thanks for the pictures and I enjoyed their sounds.

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    1. Myrna R.: Thank you. It is often a cacophony, but the corellas and the cockatoos songs are home to me.

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  41. Of course you Do! I would welcome them, too. The Noisy Miners look like they're constantly moping, even though quite beautiful. I can understand that you cheered when the young corella finally shut up. That noise can be a bit nerve wrecking after a certain time.

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    1. Carola Bartz: I love the corellas and rarely mind hearing their 'song' but the youngsters complaints were interminable. I was fascinated that the adult resolved the issue so quickly.

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  42. Corellas never come near here so I dont have to put up with their destructive habits, which is good because I really love them and it might be tainted if they were destroying something I wanted to keep.
    Every time I see corellas, they are in a great flock having the time of their lives, hanging off wires and brances, spinning and flapping and generally clowning around

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    1. kylie: I agree. The corellas do seem to have a wonderful time. Seeing them in a shower of rain hanging from the telephone lines with their wings outstretched to wash their underarms always cracks me up.

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  43. Good morning! My birds will be thanking you this week, I'm going to hang an apple on a tree just like that! High up, or my deer will no doubt eat it first! Thanks for sharing such lovely looks into your bird view! You are so very lucky, they are wonderful.

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    1. Karen S.: I hope your birds enjoy it as much as ours. Lots of them don't eat apple - but those that do love it. And yes, we are lucky and grateful.

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  44. I know those birds could peck my face off, but because I love birds so much I want to kiss their little faces.

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    1. T. Powell Coltrin: This morning I hand fed king parrots again, and thought my smile would split my face.

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  45. I haven't visited your blog for quite a while and am glad I stopped by today. Your avian obsession is quite a lovely thing to share. Those noisy miners have really amazing eyes!

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    1. Kathleen Cassen Mickelson: Nice to see you come by - and you are right about their eyes. I found them fascinating.

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  46. Those eyes - what are the Noisy Miners eating, besides apples? Or snorting?

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    1. Rawknrobyn: They are nectar eaters, so perhaps they have found a fermented stash?

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  47. I love seeing your birds and now I get to hear them as well! When I played the video of the corellas, my dog Shelby went flying to the back door to be lest out and chase those invasive critters away. After I let her out I played it again and she was in a panic to get back in the house to get rid of them again. I might entertain myself with them a few more times today. (Shelby is a slow learner)

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    1. Anne in the kitchen: Poor Shelby would be an exhausted slow learner if she lived here. Love that she was determined to protect you. Perhaps she has seen The Birds.

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  48. Those complaining youngsters come in all species! I'm imagining Mom wapping it on the head, and I'm getting a good laugh at that youngster's expense. Lovely pictures as always.

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    1. cleemckenzie: They do indeed come from all species. And I haven't seen them dealt with better than by the adult corella.

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  49. That is funny about it complaining. I had no idea.

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    1. The Happy Whisk: I am hungry. Can I have some of what you are having? I am really hungry. Can you hear me? I AM HUNGRY. And repeat.

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    2. You sure can. Will teleport you anything you fancy.

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  50. Dear Elephant's Child, I learn so much from you. Until I began to follow your blog years ago, I never had any desire to visit Australia. Now I do! Peace.

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    1. Dee: The blogosphere expands (and shrinks) our world beautifully doesn't it?

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  51. I thought the minor lovely and so nice to be able to hear the calls, I think the internet is so good for sharing and spreading knowledge and learning.

    I enjoyed my visit to your blog, thank you.

    All the best Jan

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    1. Lowcarb team member ~ Jan: I agree with you. I am so happy to have found the blogosphere in particular. It enriches my world.

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  52. Such beautiful, if noisy, visitors!

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  53. What interesting and lovely birds. Thanks for sharing. Some birds do have the most interesting calls. We have one here in Riga. Right outside my bedroom window the birds gather in the apple tree and one has a strange sound that almost sounds like the tinkle of the doorbell we have at our gate. Sometimes I've wondered who could be at our gate so early but of course there is never anyone there it is that bird.

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    1. Rasma Raisters: A bird which sounded like a bell could be quite disconcerting. Some of our birds are superb mimics, but none which live close to me.

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  54. Look at that adorable last picture! Almost like the bird is proud of its own call.

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    1. John Wiswell: The young corella does have that look doesn't it? And it is a beautiful bird, despite its less than tuneful call.

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  55. Excellent bird pictures! Thanks for sharing these.

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    1. J Lenni Dorner: Welcome and thank you.

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  56. Look at that baby!
    As with humans, it's not good to push mom's patience:)

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    1. Sandra Cox: And just like humans some don't realise that until it is toooooo late.

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  57. Avian obsession? I cannot possibly relate to such a thing..... - :)
    Thank you, EC, for sharing your birds! The Noisy Miner is new to me and I had to go research it a bit. Another one for the "wish list"!

    Thanks for you recent visit and cool comments! Hope your day is a great one!

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    1. Wally Jones: The avianista group is getting bigger all the time. I am so grateful that the blogosphere has showed me so many 'weirdos' whose tribe I can belong to.

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  58. Thanks for sharing birds I have never heard of. I'm glad you welcome them even if they are noisy. I posted my Wild Bird Wednesday tomorrow if you'd like to take a look. I've joined you as a follower. Jo

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    1. Jo: Welcome and thank you. I will certainly come and check out your Wild Birds.

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  59. The Miner looks like it is wearing yellow eye-liner. :)

    We've a really shiny black bird with a dollop of vibrant red on its wing I see occasionally flying around Golden Gate Park. I don't know his name, but so enjoy spotting him when I can.

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    1. Bea: I wonder whether the bird you have been seeing is the Red-winged Blackbird - which I would LOVE to see with my own eyes. You are right about the eye make-up. And the corellas rock blue eyeshadow better than most humans.

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  60. I love that my morning has started out listening to bird calls. So nice (even that squawky corella!) :)

    And the miner birds have such lovely eyes! And it is cute that they put what looks like a Santa hat in the box with the birds in that video.

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    1. LynnL I am glad to start your day with bird calls. It is currently too early for ours, but (co-incidence) I have just been listening to one from your side of the world. Utah to be precise.

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  61. I love getting to know the birds you have in your area. I sit and watch birds as much as I can at home. I think the miner has a pretty call. Such a pretty bird too! Glad you enjoy the birds too. :)
    ~Jess

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    1. DMS~Jess: I like its call too - and its pretty face. The birds are a daily delight.

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  62. That is a super-cute baby corella!

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    1. Kim: And a healthy one too - which is lovely. And, despite the complaints, I think a happy one.

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  63. Great photos of our fine feathered friends, as always. I think we call them mynah birds over hear. I clicked on a link to make sure of the spelling & the link says myna (without an h). Maybe is is just an American thing, but I have never seen them called miners before. We probably pronounce it the same way you do, lol.

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    1. rhymeswithplague: The miner and the myna(h) are different birds. The Noisy Miner is native to Australia, and the myrnah introduced (and classified as a pest). And yes, I suspect we pronounce them the same way.

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