Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Sunday, 8 July 2018

Sunday Selections #387

Sunday Selections was originally brought to us by Kim of Frogpondsrock, as an ongoing meme where participants could post previously unused photos languishing in their files.
 
The meme is now continued by River at Drifting through life.  The rules are so simple as to be almost non-existent.  Post some photos under the title Sunday Selections and link back to River.  Clicking on any of the photos will make them embiggen. 
 
Like River I usually run with a theme.  I am continuing to focus on winter this week.


Each year, our National Arboretum, has an exhibit called 'Warm Trees'.  Selected trees are given winter woollies to combat the cold - and entice more visitors to the arboretum.  The woollies are knitted by volunteers.  When the exhibit is over the woollies will be repurposed, and washed (repaired if necessary) before being given to cold humans and/or animals.  Which is lovely. 

We headed off on a chilly day last week and thoroughly enjoyed ourselves.  The arboretum is still a baby and I will be long gone by the time it reaches its peak, but it is a lovely idea and I am always happy to visit.  More forests are planted each year, which I love.  I enjoy the colourful quirkiness of the warm trees exhibit too.







I chuckled in rueful sympathy when I noticed that some of the trees stretch the seams of their woollies.



The views are lovely too.


There was a special feature piece in tribute to our near neighbours in New Zealand.  


Close up?  It is a colourful mess.



So we went some distance to get a different perspective.  And yes, with a generous helping of imagination it is possible to see that colourful mess as a kiwi.







The trees weren't the only things given woollies.  The walls leading to the Visitors' Centre were also decorated. I think the fern was a nod to New Zealanders too.




We stopped in at the Bonsai Centre (aka Tree Torture Centre) and saw some teensy weensy scarves there too.

As usual I took lots and lots of photos.  There will probably be another Arboretum post in the coming weeks.  That is, if my computer which is behaving very, very badly lets me.  If I am absent in the next little while it is almost certainly hardware issues at fault.

154 comments:

  1. thanks so much for sharing this,, it was wonderful,, what talented and industrious souls to take part in such a beautiful activity! I love it!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. laurie: It is fun isn't it, and does seem to encourage more visitors to the arboretum - which is a wonderful place.

      Delete
  2. Dear EC
    Yarn bombing always makes me smile and it is good to know the knitted items will go on to be useful. I do like the teeny tiny scarves too (and although I appreciate the time and skill that Bonsai demands, I do feel sorry for those little trees.)
    Best wishes
    Ellie

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ellie Foster: It makes me smile too. I do appreciate the work which goes into bonsai, but it always makes me think of foot binding.

      Delete
  3. Oh, I simply LOVE the tree woolies. I think I remember the same event a few years back, but it makes no difference in my enjoyment to visit them again. I laughed at the stretching at the seams comment. :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Djan: Some of those trees were definitely stretched at the seams. Which I have often observed in people. Last years woollies not fitting this years body. And the cap may (or may not) fit me.

      Delete
  4. It’s a great idea, especially when needy people and animals benefit. We were in the UK a few years ago and there was a movement afoot to clothe trees in knitted items. It was in aid of a charity if I remember correctly, but I am not sure how the beneficiary benefitted.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. David Gascoigne: I like that the woollies get repurposed too. And there are moves afoot at the moment to ensure that everyone who needs it in my chilly (for Australia) city gets a coat. Which I am impressed at.

      Delete
  5. Replies
    1. Jamie Ghione: It has been running for a few years now and is very popular.

      Delete
  6. I remember your woolies from previous years.
    That is one colorful kiwi.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Alex J. Cavanaugh: A much more colourful kiwi than the real bird. And bigger.

      Delete
  7. I love the idea of tree woolies. It must be so much fun. It would be great if we did something around here as cold weather sets in.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. mxtodis123: I really like it too. I cannot knit, but am appreciative of the work which goes into making trees warm, and people smile.

      Delete
  8. Extra warmth is needed here the morning. The temp dropped considerably through the night with the onset of the westerly wind. I don't mind, though. The icy chill in the air is welcome...it is winter after all.

    I hope your computer problems are fixed soon, EC, and that the coming week brings no further problems. Cuddles to Jazz. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lee: It has been cool here for the last few days too. We haven't reached double digit temperatures.
      The computer problems are intermittent which makes life difficult. It took five hours before I could get it to boot up this morning. Sigh. And the tradies for the heater will be back next week.
      Cuddles for Remy and Sharma.

      Delete
  9. This is such a wonderful way to draw visitors in the winter. Creative minds at work!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Marie Smith: It is. A marketing ploy I can approve of.

      Delete
  10. I love the idea of warmed trees. Trees are the lungs of the earth and we sacrifice far too many of them. Lovely photos.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. e: It is lovely isn't it - and I agree with you so much on the subject of tree sacrifice.

      Delete
  11. I love that more forests are planted each year.
    Generous helping of imagination. I really, really LOVE that saying.
    Do you use an external harddrive to keep your photos safe?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The Happy Whisk: I love that more forest continue to be planted too. And have heard talk of eco-funerals at the arboretum. I would sign up very quickly to that initiative.
      I do indeed use an external drive for the photos. Which is just as well.

      Delete
  12. I do love the warm trees exhibit! And thank you, Canberra,for the kiwi and the ferns :) Sadly, the kiwi is a very nondescript bird, the very opposite of colourful, but perhaps that has helped it to survive thus far.

    Computer issues are very annoying ; I hope yours get sorted soon.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Alexia: I am not quite certain why Warm Trees featured the kiwi and the ferns, but smiled broadly. And computer issues are indeed very, very annoying. I hope ours can be resolved. Soon.

      Delete
  13. Yarn bomb! I've had the pleasure of seeing statues, trees and what-have-you covered in colorful woolies in my neck of the woods. It's always a treat. Good to read that these woolies help the trees during winter.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bea: Yarn bombing always makes me smile. And I like thinking of warm trees (and people and animals) from this initiative.

      Delete
  14. I never thought of cold trees always wondered why they lost there leaves in winter it would be like taking off a coat in cold weather.
    Merle......

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Merlesworld: I had never thought about it that way - but you are right.

      Delete
  15. Arboretums are great places, and i like how this one reaches out in such a fun and unusual way.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. messymimi: Arboretums are wonderful places and I hope this one goes from strength to strength.

      Delete
  16. They certainly add colour to the trees, and I do like that the knitted items will be re-purposed.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. CountryMum: Me too - on both counts.

      Delete
  17. I love the imagination of this and the playfulness!
    Hope your computer problems get solved quickly. They are so frustrating.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. River Fairchild: Quirky fun is always welcome isn't it. The computer problems continue, but at least it is (currently) usable. I wish I knew what the issue is.

      Delete
  18. Perhaps your computer is in need of a little winter warmth and you could wrap it in a blankie? I love seeing scarves on the trees, they look so cheerful. The crocheted fern leaves are nice, people are so clever with their crafty ideas.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. River: I wish I knew what the computer needed. I really wish it.
      The scarves are great - and the artistry in some of them was brilliant.

      Delete
  19. Very brightly coloured knitted tree garments. The Arboretum looks wonderful and what great views. It is nice to plant things for a time when you will not be around to see them matured. The tortured trees are very well done and must be worth a fortune. We once had a nice small one, but I killed it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Andrew: I never tire of the arboretum - or the views. They are adding to it all the time. Some of the trees in the Bonsai area are on loan, but they wouldn't be cheap. There is quite a lot of age to some of them.

      Delete
  20. Oh my gosh -- tree cozies! ;) These are so cool! It was 111 yesterday by the coast, so sweaters on trees seems a bit of an anomaly right now.
    Marty K

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Marty K: 111? Bleah. I much prefer our current temperatures. I think we reached a top of 9C (32F).

      Delete
  21. That kiwi is a strange beastie!
    If the mercury drops much more I'll be in need of a hand-out!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. dinahmow: A very strange beast. I am glad that we were told that it was a kiwi. I am not sure I would have worked it out without clues.

      Delete
  22. Rather like Bonsai, but don't like trees with crocheted or knitted pieces on them, they look a mess..

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Margaret-whiteangel: To each his/her own. I don't think I would like the scarves to be a permanent decoration, but do enjoy the temporay splashes of colour.

      Delete
  23. I love these colorful decorations for the trees. Such a beautiful area too. Thanks for the birthday greetings EC. Have a great :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Denise inVa: Thank you. I hope your birthday was wonderful.

      Delete
  24. Folks are so creative. I’m amazed.
    R

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Rick Watson: Creativity always awes and delights me.

      Delete
  25. I always love your winter woolies post and think I'll do my trees up for next winter but never do. They would get so wet. Meanwhile our forests are burning again.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Strayer: I am sorry your forests are burning. Ours do every summer and it is just awful. So many bird and animal homes and habitants destroyed, and often some people's lives too.

      Delete
  26. Wow! What a brilliant and colorful idea! Hugs...RO

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. RO: Isn't it fun? Hugs gratefully received and returned.

      Delete
  27. Looking forward to more pics. I love the idea that they recycle them for folks and critters in need.
    Have a glorious day.
    Hugs

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sandra Cox: Thank you. The recycling is a wonderful idea isn't it?

      Delete
  28. Replies
    1. Sue in Italia/In the Land of Cancer: It is. And warming to see on cool/cold days.

      Delete
  29. I think this is such a fun and unique exhibit to gussie up the trees for the cooler weather. I especially love the picture of the woolie straining to wrap aound the tree which literally is busting at the seams. It might possibly remind me of putting on a too tight sweater after a summer of over-indulgence. (Which might possibly be me nearly every year)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anne in the kitchen: I am glad to read that I am not alone in recognising that straining at the seams feeling. I lost weight over summer, but it was still very familiar.

      Delete
  30. I empathized with the trees whose woollies were too tight!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. fishducky: It seems a lot of us did.

      Delete
  31. Hi EC - stretchy seams, expanding trunks ... sadly comes to most of us ... but lovely that the arboretum is planting up more areas ... and have lovely ideas like this for you to visit and us to see ... lovely (but hope the glitches sort themselves out) - cheers Hilary

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hilary Melton-Butcher: There are more forests being planted each year, which I think is lovely. The focus is on planting rare and endangered trees from Australia and the world. And a bit of fun never goes astray.

      Delete
  32. LOVE the woolies and completely understand the stretched seams :) The kiwi was a very ambitious project and turned out lovely. The ferns and flowers are a wonderful addition as well.

    I do hope your computer gets over its huff, although I've never known it to happen without some kind of help from humans . . .

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. jenny_o: The computer is still having a hissy fit. If we turn it off it is very, very hard to get it to start again - it took five hours yesterday. Once is does start it runs with no problems. So last night we left it running.
      The woollies are fun aren't they? Or I think so.

      Delete
    2. Five hours is a long time. It probably felt more like five days. Strange that it's just the starting that is the problem. Does the on/off button seem to be working or does it turn on fine and then just get hung up?

      Delete
    3. jenny_o:It just refuses to start up And refuses. And if we turn the power off will ultimately agree to sysrt and run. It did the five hour refusal two days running so now we leave it on. Weird.

      Delete
  33. Hello EC! Love this post! So creative this exhibit called 'Warm Trees'. These woollies knitted by volunteers are really beautiful. Just great idea too.
    Lots of Hugs!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. sonia a. mascaro: As a non-knitter I am blown away by the creativity and beauty. Hugs received and returned.

      Delete
  34. Im embarrassed for those poor trees. I mean REALLY. They have pride, ya know!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Author R. Mac Wheeler: Do you mean the fat-shaming, or the decorations?

      Delete
  35. Always love your photos. Thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  36. All dressed up, scarves for each the season.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bob Bushell: All dressed up - and not going anywhere.

      Delete
  37. You are lovely to stroll with🌺

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Cloudia: It is lovely to have the company.

      Delete
  38. LOVE the woolies program. I've always been against yarn bombing because around here it seems they stay up until they're a mess and then get pitched by people in authority, so never put to good use. I know in our local park some have been taken down and pitched away in a matter of days. Very irritating.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sandy: The woollies on the trees stay up for a month. I suspect if we get torrential rain (which we need) they will come down sooner. I do like the finite nature of the program, and love that they will be repurposed. It will be chilly here for quite some time after Warm Trees is over.

      Delete
  39. Lovely? Those views are magnificent!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Blue Grumpster: They are aren't they? And later I will show some more of that magnificence. I do like my city.

      Delete
    2. I can't for the life of me imagine why :)

      Delete
    3. Blue Grumpster: That beautiful spot is about twenty minutes from home. We should go more often.

      Delete
  40. I sure hope your computer allows you! I am amazed at how many crocheters yall have to make these. These woolies are cute. I like the purposes they have. Even the tiny bonsai ones lol

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Kim Standard: It is amazing how many talented (and generous) people there are. And I am super impressed at the Warm Trees initiative.
      The computer had a further hissy fit this afternoon, but for the moment (clutching at wood) it is working.

      Delete
  41. Those trees have nicer pants than I do!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. John Wiswell: And me. The fit is about the same though.

      Delete
  42. I had to chuckle at the bonsai scarves!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. kylie: My non-knitting self thought that (so long as some else cast on and off for me) I could manage them.

      Delete
  43. Greetings. How is that computer behaving? I loathe computer issues.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sandra Cox: We won't talk about the computer. Or about the someone in the house who refuses a technician to deal with the beast.

      Delete
  44. Wow! The views are so lovely.

    Great post I loved the photographs, you can never have too many.
    Hope your computer is behaving!

    All the best Jan

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lowcarb team member ~Jan: Thank you. It really is a lovely spot, and will only get better as the forests mature and as more are planted.
      The computer is still unwell. And the problems are intermittent which makes a fix even harder.

      Delete
  45. A colorful mess can be the most enjoyable mess of all.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Rawknrobyn: And isn't that the truth?

      Delete
  46. Love those woolies on the trees.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Rasma Raisters: They are fun aren't they?

      Delete
  47. Guerrilla knitting at its best!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lady Fi: Guerilla knitting isn't a term I have heard before. Love it - though this is sanctioned.

      Delete
  48. Love the quirk and the warmth. And the views are to die for!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nilanjana Bose: Quirkiness always warms my heart - whatever the season (or reason).

      Delete
  49. That's wonderful that the Arboretum gives a friendly nod to New Zealand.
    Have a lovely day, my friend.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sandra Cox: The arboretum is a friendly place. Still wrestling with computer issues. I hope your day(s) are glitch free.

      Delete
  50. Dear EC, what a great idea. So innovative and creative. I've never heard of anything like that here in the States. And yes, I too chuckled at the knitted/crocheted dressing that didn't quite make it all the way around the tree trunk--it 's as if we are looking at a what is called--here--a "beer belly."

    I look forward to more photos. Peace.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dee: Beer belly is a familiar term here too. My belly owes nothing to that beverage though.

      Delete
    2. Dear EC, nor mine! Peace.

      Delete
    3. Dee: Also self induced, but not by beer. Peace to you too.

      Delete
  51. I love this post so much! What a great idea! So beautiful!! I laughed about the trees stretching some of the seams, with their woolies. I have stretched some seams too! LOL!
    I hope your computer stays healthy!!
    (Thank you again, for writing back yesterday! Thank you for being you!)
    Big Hugs!!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Magic Love Crow: I think many of us are familiar with the stretched seams. Too many.
      The computer is not well still, but is (for the moment) functioning.
      Huge hugs.

      Delete
  52. You had me with the first tree. :-)

    Greetings from London.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. A Cuban in London: Even knowing what to expect (we go every year now) we smile at the firs tree and keep smiling.

      Delete
  53. I like this idea! And they look so beautiful!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nas: The knitters and crocheters are creative souls aren't they? And do beautiful, whimsical work.

      Delete
  54. they are beautiful, I love that they are simplistic yet intricate,,

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. laurie: You are right, and I so admire the talent which created them.

      Delete
  55. This idea was unique. Looks colorful and good:)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Weekend-Windup: Thank you. It has been running for a few years now, and gets more visitors each year.

      Delete
  56. Oh my, I love the woolies over the trees. It’s so creative!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. T. Powell Coltrin: Isn't it? Creative, beautiful and fun.

      Delete
  57. I remember you've been to this before. So pretty all the scarves and woolies! I especially loved the little red ones climbing the wall :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. mshatch: You are right. Having discovered the event we now go every year. It is the same, it is different and it makes us smile.

      Delete
  58. Those pictures are really cool.

    ReplyDelete
  59. Love it that they are putting little wraps around all those lovely trees.
    This should be done all over the world.....I believe trees have souls too.....what a great idea..

    xo

    Jo

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My Grama's Soul: Welcome. I too believe trees have souls. Patient souls. And are incredibly beautiful. And necessary.

      Delete
  60. I love your Arboretum, went there a while ago. What a fun theme to have winter woollies, and also wonderful re the community involvement. I don't get bonsai - I guess because I don't like torture.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. catmint: I agree with you about bonsai. Completely. Tree torture. Strongly reminiscent of foot binding. Love the warm trees initiative though.

      Delete
  61. I like those "clothes" in trees.
    Lovely place to see all these beautiful art.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. orvokki: The arboretum is lovely, and as well as the trees and the spectacular views has other art too.

      Delete
  62. Trees are a good thing. In some really cold climates street trees are wrapped to protect them from the winter cold and drying winds, Chicago comes to mind.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Linda Starr: These wraps are decorative rather than functional. Just the same a representative from the arboretum said yesterday that he wondered whether they would encourage more growth. Time will tell.

      Delete
  63. I love this! They do this in some townships on Long Island. They call it yarn bombing. It's so beautiful and vibrant!

    Elsie

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Elsie Amata: It is fun isn't it? And this is even sanctioned yarn bombing.

      Delete
  64. Is the weather still chilly?
    We were pushing a 100 yesterday.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sandra Cox: It is definitely still on the cool side. As I type this we are still in the negative zone, and we 'might' reach double figures today. Just.

      Delete
  65. Haha love the tiny scarves on the bonsai trees. The kiwi is very clever too. My sister-in-law loves to knit, I bet she'd love to make a scarf for a cold tree. :D

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. LL Cool Joe: I learned this week that some of the tree warmers were made by people overseas. Perhaps your sister in law could join in the fun next year.

      Delete
  66. I wonder how and where the notion of decorating trees like that originated. The ladies in our little town even knit colorful wraps for the trees in our parks, too. The color is very welcome on drab winter days, isn't it? Kinda whimsical and cheerful. Maybe I should crochet a shawl for our big ol' gum tree. Poor old thing might get cold... :)

    Have a wonderful weekend!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Susan: I am not sure where the idea came from, but think it was a stroke of genius. Having seen the first Warm Trees exhibition we make a point of going back each year - and always smile.
      I hope your weekend is wonderful and your spark firing again.

      Delete
  67. Oh WOW...these are absolutely stunning!!
    Such an original idea...decorating the trees in this way.
    I have never seen anything like this before!
    Thank you so much for sharing...:))

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ygraine: Aren't they lovely? I am so pleased you enjoyed them too.

      Delete
  68. Such lovely works of art, the trees If they could sing would be singing songs of delight! I especially enjoyed the last photo and those cute little scarfs! Too cute.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Karen S: I am pretty sure that trees do speak/sing/shout and wish we had the ears to hear them. And can always make room for whimsy and beauty.

      Delete
  69. what a lovely, community spirited way of bringing some colour and smiles to winter ... just lovely, thank you

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Kim: It is isn't it? And the community of knitters now extends overseas, which I also think is lovely.

      Delete
  70. Cute wee scarves on the Bonsai. I recall other years of this and I love the whole shebang. I've never seen anything along these lines here, but I know some folks do practice the art of tree and lampost wooling. Great photos dearie X

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. All Consuming: We love the complete shebang too. And love the wrapping to said shebang.

      Delete
  71. Replies
    1. Sandra Cox: Thank you. It has been v busy so far, but productive.

      Delete
  72. Hola me paso tu blog Anna de poemias, me a encantado
    gracias

    Besos

    ReplyDelete