Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Wednesday, 27 November 2019

Words for Wednesday











This meme was started by Delores a long time ago.  Words for Wednesday is now provided by a number of people and has become a movable feast. 

Essentially the aim is to encourage us to write.  Each week we are given a choice of prompts: which can be words, phrases, music or an image.   What we do with those prompts is up to us:  a short story, prose, a song, a poem, or treating them with ignore...  We can use some or all of the prompts.

Some of us put our creation in comments on the post, and others post on their own blog.  I would really like it if as many people as possible joined into this fun meme, which includes cheering on the other participants.  If you are posting on your own blog - let me know so that I, and other participants, can come along and applaud.

The prompts will be here this month but are provided by Margaret Adamson, and her friend Sue Fulcher.  They  have also included photographs
by the very talented Bill Dodds.



This week's prompts are:


  1. Orange
  2. Dizzy
  3. Perpendicular
  4. Languishing
  5. Virtuous
  6. Theatre 

And/or




  1. Pedestrian
  2. Laconic
  3. Stable
  4. Typewriter
  5. Dashing
  6. Branches




Have fun.

Next month the words will be on Cindi's blog.  She has very generously said that she will post them on Tuesday so that participants from the Southern Hemisphere will see them on their Wednesday. 
Next year is looking good too, and when my email behaves I will finalise the schedule and post it.  

109 comments:

  1. Have fun participants! Can't wait to see what you all do.

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    1. Cloudia: I hope that the writers and the readers have fun. Each and every week.

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  2. "Perpendicula."

    I wouldn't even hazard a guess...

    I'm with Cloudia. I can't wait to see what you all do.

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    1. Sandi: Thank you for pointing out the typo I 'thought' I had fixed. Perpendicula is perpendicular. I will fix that when I have posted this.

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    2. Ha ha! Ok, I actually looked up perpendicula after I posted that comment. I thought for sure it was a fancy word for things that are perpendicular. I didn't know it was a typo! 😂

      P.S. Thank you for your kind comment on my post about my niece's neck injury. I appreciate it!

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    3. Sandi: I do hope she gets completely better and very quickly. It must be such a worrying time for you all.

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  3. If asked, Leah's workmates would describe her as stable, responsible and laconic. She watched, she listened but she rarely contributed to the conversation. Appearances can be (and in this case were) deceiving.
    Yes, Leah's life appeared pedestrian. She went to work, she did her job, she came home. The perfect camouflage.
    However, the perpendicular pile of folders beside her typewriter told a different story. Story, after story after story. Dizzy blondes, virtuous languishing heroines, dark and dashing heroes, lonely men hanging from branches in isolated terrain...
    She didn't limit herself to one genre either. Poems, murder mysteries, sci-fi, romance, self-help. She was successful too. She had been published in magazines, had written for radio and for television.
    The orange folder on top of the pile beside that typewriter was her latest venture. She was writing a play - two acts about a group of people who worked for an insurance company. She hoped it would appear in theatres all over the country - and that her co-workers didn't recognise themselves...

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    1. Leah sounds feisty!! I'd buy her books. Maybe not the play. That would be too expensive, but two books for sure:)

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    2. Leah is obviously a virtuoso of many talents...as many are soon to discover!!

      Good one, EC. :)

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    3. I wouldn't mind a bit of Leah in myself. My writing has languished long enough I think.

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    4. Nice story. Let's hope her co-workers do not find out. It's easier to watch people when thy do not know they're being watched.

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    5. it would be interesting writing a play about her workmates and then invite them to the performance and see what they said!!!

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    6. People seldom, i think, recognize themselves if you change just enough of the circumstances. Anyway, i hope she is so wildly successful she can leave the corporate world behind.

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    7. Good one and lots of words in use. I like the sound of Leah. At the moment I have no ideas.

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    8. This piece really drew me in. Thank you, E.C.!

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    10. Hi EC love this ... so much imagination roaming ... stories pouring out ... will she be discovered, will her work colleagues ever find out about her mental note taking of their lives and characters ... it's certainly a body of work waiting to be found.

      Good to see you around again ... long may you continue to feel easier. Well done - cheers Hilary

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    11. I'm very happy to see you back in the blogosphere, dear lady.

      Great job with the prompts! I wonder if most writers aren't a teensy bit like Leah. Overlooked by others as bland nobodys during the day, but once they shed their daytime personae, strap on their super power capes and and start writing, woo HOO! Anything goes!

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    12. What a fabulous punchline! Still chuckling... :-)

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    13. Magic Love Crow: Thank you. So much.

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  4. I love it. Leah's story needs to be told.

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    1. Lisa: Thank you. I suspect she is happy flying under the radar.

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  5. As the first detective on the scene, he turned the corner hoping to see controlled mayhem, but seeing the two Orange County ambulances and no one hustling around, he let off the lead foot and felt Dizzy.

    The lack of sleep was getting to him. He shook his head, taking a deep breath and parked the unmarked car Perpendicular to the sidewalk.

    He nodded to the two EMTs Languishing by the back doors of one ambulance. None of the gear they’d grabbed on the go was used, so now the only thing needed was resetting for the next call.

    The detective went under the yellow tape, scratching his signature for the clipboard-wielding Uniform. Steering his feet away from the Chief, who shone at the other end of the caution-taped-off zone, he stopped to watch for a moment as the Chief bathed by media-owned lights spouted the same Virtuous words of revenge and justice. A Theatre, somewhere far from here, could please god use his talents one day. Anything to get him away from here.

    Fifty feet farther, he’s behind the white canvas barrier surrounding the body. He'd only been told there was a dead Pedestrian, now he shakes off a burst of chills on his arms and legs. It *was* another kid.

    The Chief wasn’t hustling, the detective knew that, not in an off-election year, so for the first time, he felt truly Laconic about the outcome.

    Closing his eyes, he took in some deep breaths and a calmness arrived as he withdrew another stash of adrenalin. He’d overdraw one of these days, but not today. This was the 13th victim in 27 months and nothing in his life would be Stable until this killer was put down.

    He took one more look, checked in with his partner who’d arrived with the photographer and wondered briefly what was going on between them?

    Too tired, he gave up and could think about them and other things later. For the rest of the evening, he’d sit by his Typewriter collating information from those returning from the scene with any number of raw notes in hand.

    The team was Dashing forward but were also being slapped backward by strong Branches of bad evidence leading them down too many rabbit holes. This was better than staring at the ceiling and he had to do something. He grabbed another set of notes and began his two-finger typing.

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    1. This is terrific, Mark...you've captured the reader's attention...and held it. Well done! :)

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    2. Mark Koopmans: Echoing Lee. I also hope that the Chief is evicted. Soon. And that your hero gets a promotion.

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    3. I want to know who is killing these kids!

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    4. Whoa. Let's hope next weeks words tell you who the killer is - and that you tell us.

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    5. Thanks everyone! As always, I really appreciate the feedback and kind words.

      @Uglemor: Now *that* is my kind of challenge! Thanks for the great idea! Hopefully, the Detective will be up for it, too :)

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    6. He sounds like the kind of officer i'd want on the case, one who cares. Well told!

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    7. So now Mark, you have to finish the story for all of us.

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    8. What a wonderful well written story. Well done with the challenging words

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    9. Hi Mark - well done ... the killer in the area needs to be found - hope he can extract decent ideas from his notes. Take care - cheers Hilary

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  6. Overcome with unexpected dizziness, slowly she slid down, ending up resting perpendicular against the wall. There she remained, languishing, waiting for her breathing to become stable.

    A pedestrian, sipping on what appeared to be orange juice, stopped briefly to ask if she was on her way to the theatre. His virtuous tone reminded her of some snobbish members of branches of her extended, well-to-do family. In his ignorance, the fellow continued sipping on his drink, oblivious to her obvious discomfort.

    Her laconic response to his insincere enquiry was a crisp, curt “Yes!” She wished he’d just leave...leave her alone. She got her wish. With his head in the air he strode off without a backward glance.

    After taking many long, deep breaths, she stood, gingerly at first, but the dizziness had passed almost as quickly as it appeared.

    She decided it best to return home rather than continue onto the theatre to see “The Calilfornia Typewriter”, the new documentary/movie directed by Doug Nichol, starring Tom Hanks, Sam Shepard, John Mayer, and others. It could wait for another day. She could see the crowd up ahead dashing towards the foyer of the building. She didn’t want to get caught up in the hustle and bustle.

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    1. Lee: I really like this - and hope that karma bites the pedestrian's fundament. Hard.

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    2. Ohhh.. why was she dizzy? Is she expecting? Sick? Curious minds want to know more:) Great stuff and initially I had high hopes for Orange Juice man, but he obviously just sucks all by his lonesome self.

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    3. Can't say i blame her for waiting, and he sounds as if he's a rather hard person to like.

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    4. A great mysterious story and leaves us wanting more

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    5. Hi Lee - love this mysterious take ... and definitely want to know more - but I'm glad she went home! Cheers Hilary

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  7. Being surrounded by orange paint was enough to make Cassie dizzy. Who would choose that for the theater performance of “The Virtuous Detective”? Cassie had spent her life languishing in the wings, her life running on a perpendicular path. What the hell, she thought. Grabbing the bucket of ruby red paint, Cassie created a Jackson Pollock, all over the orange walls, curtains, floor. Now it was time to leave town. Finally.

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    1. Susan Kane: I love Cassie's courage. I have been tempted to have a Jackson Pollock moment myself.. More than once.

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    2. He he, serves them right. Courage is good.

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    3. I've had those moments where I had enough and just let 'em have it. Not in quite such an artistic way, though.

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    4. Hi Susan - that's great ... the old orange, the new red and the lady leaves town ... fun to read - cheers Hilary

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  8. Interesting selection there, I'm almost dizzy at the thought of dashing off a few sentences on my typewriter instead of languishing on the sofa reading about dashing heroes being all virtuous yet laconic at the same time.

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    1. River: I do love your prompt filled sentence.

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    2. That's the way to do it, River :) I was going for that impact, too, but my bloody detective was too nosey!

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    3. I like your take on things. Very concise!

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    4. Brilliant. Only you could combine the words in one sentence River.

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    5. Hi River - very concise, yet telling an appropriate story ... how often are we not sure which way to go. Cheers Hilary

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  9. Hi EC - good to see you around again and I hope all continues to improve - loved the flowers at the weekend.

    "Stable she sat at her typewriter, her eyes peering through the branches, dreaming about the dashing pedestrian who passed each day … laconic she could not be."

    Cheers Hilary

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    1. Hilary Melton-Butcher: Yet another person who can wrap so many of these challenging words into one sentence. I really liked it.

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    2. Start of a beautiful friendship, i hope.

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    3. I have difficulty being laconic when writing. I am even less than laconic when talking, unless I know people well.

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    4. The Real Cie: If I am nervous (which I always am when people are new to me) I talk too much.

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    5. Well done Hilary in using the challenging words in this sentence

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    6. Hi everyone - thanks ... being laconic, can have its advantages - slow but sure perhaps. Cheers Hilary

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  10. Will have to have a go at putting words into a little story sometime - it's nice to see you about EC :)

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    1. Margaret-whiteangel: I hope you can join us some week - and thank you.

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  11. https://nothoughtsnoprayersnonothing.blogspot.com/2019/11/wednesday-words-dashing.html

    I like all of your Wednesday stories. I particularly like "lonely men hanging from branches in isolated terrain."
    I wrote about a rather smarty pants man. Maybe we should hang some of those out to dry too. :)

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    1. nothoughtsnoprayersnonothing: I liked reading about your smarty pants man - but wouldn't trust him. At all.

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    1. Uglemor: I always love reading more of Susan's tale. Thank you.

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  13. I really enjoyed everyone's efforts this week...I really much give it a shot again myself one of these days...😉

    I do so hope you are doing ok.😊😊

    Much love and hugs ❤❤❤❤❤❤❤

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    1. Ygraine: Huge thanks for your (always) kind words. I do hope you can join us again.
      Love and hugs reciprocated.

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    1. natalia20041989: I hope people ARE having fun, and thank you.

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    1. Kinga K.: Thank you. The credit is Margaret Adamson and her friends though, and they deserve our thanks.

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  16. Sandcastle Creations
    I created it using this and one other prompt. It is also going to be included in one of the two chapbooks that I am currently working on.
    I am very far behind on publishing comments. I am tremendously busy and don't need negative comments having a chance to sideline me right now. Tomorrow is the ninth anniversary of my father's death. It's hitting me harder than I expected and I'm kind of not in a great place at the moment. Can't even go out and take a walk because it's windy and bitter cold.
    Yes, I would like some cheese with that whine.

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    1. The Real Cie: I will be over to read your piece when I finish responding the comments. I am sorry that you are in a bad place and yes, some anniversaries bite very hard indeed.
      What sort of cheese would you like?

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  17. I applaud everyone's efforts!

    And I'm horrified to find that my understanding of the word "laconic" has been wrong all these years! Eek!

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    1. me too jenny_o, for years I thought it meant laid back, easy going, now I know it means man of few words aka curt, brief, terse etc

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    2. jenny_o and River: I did know, but looked it up to confirm that I was right. Margaret's prompts often have me reaching for a dictionary.

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    3. I too looked up laconic to check I'd understood its meaning - then promptly amended my entry! Good to learn these things ... and sadly promptly forget! Cheers H

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    4. When we write prompts Jenny, we do have in mind that some of the words may be challenging and may never have been heard before. However we think that is a good thing.

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  18. The trapeze artiste in her dashing orange dress made me feel quite dizzy as she appeared to be languishing perpendicular to the high wire. It was, nevertheless, a somewhat pedestrian performance and made me wish I had gone to the theatre instead. However, when the horses came on the scene I changed my mind whilst watching them dashing about in an apparently disordered fashion I vowed to visit the stable to see these beautiful animals. I eventually did so and talked to the stablemaster who gave very laconic answers to my interested questions. So, I wandered home feeling somewhat disappointed.

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    1. Jo: Wow, this took me in directions I didn't expect and yes, I can see how disappointing it must have been. Hopefully your protagonist can go to the theatre tomorrow.

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    2. Hi Jo - well that was 'fun' ... while your visuals reminded me of Christmas decorations - not sure why! But how occasionally we can go home somewhat disappointed after a circus performance. Cheers Hilary

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    3. One always goes to the circus with great excitement so I am sorry you came home disappoiinted

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  19. Mine has been posted and wraps up Winter Sun in a way I think will satisfy everyone: Winter Sun 14

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    1. Cindi Summerlin: Justice is served. Which is lovely.

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    2. Oh, I sure hope this was the end. It was a good one, as I am a sucker for happy endings. I kept waiting for something awful to happen as you wrote something in the line of "her nightmare was just about to begin" in one of the first chapters.

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  20. Wow! Loved reading everyone's stories!

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    1. Authors with Advice: So do I. Each and every week I am blown away by the imagination and talent.

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  21. If you were kind you could say that his manner of speech was LACONIC. If you were truthful you would say that it was brusque, with more than a hint of sarcasm much of the time. His bravado masked the fact that he was a PEDESTRIAN sort of fellow with not a whole lot going for him. He had an intimate acquaintance with Jack Daniels, Jim Beam, Johnny Walker and other such notables, and I sometimes wondered how he managed to remain PERPENDICULAR. He was LANGUISHING in mediocrity and took to his TYPEWRITER to attempt in words what he couldn't achieve in deeds. In most people you can find some good aspects to their character, but there was nothing VIRTUOUS about this jerk. You would get DIZZY trying to ascribe sterling qualities to him. You had to feel sorry for his wife, who was STABLE and quite DASHING in her own way. She was effectively trapped in a THEATRE of the absurd and the objectionable. I remember once seeing her in a beautiful ORANGE dress, which was akin to his face at the time, since he was well and truly inebriated, incoherent almost. There are many BRANCHES of humanity it must be said, but some have withered and dies before others even begin to bear fruit.

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    1. David M. Gascoigne: How I love this tale. Since one of my family members was an alcoholic, too much of it is familiar. And my heart goes out to his wife.
      I am glad that you also suffer from dyslexic fingers. I knew what you meant, and you didn't need to correct it.

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    2. Oh, those notables. They're nice as aquaintances, but any closer and they take over your life and the life of those around you. Well written.

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  22. Should say "withered and died" not "withered and dies."

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  23. You convinced me this was a real person. And I realised what you meant too.

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    1. Jo: Sadly I think that many of us know people just like this one.

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  24. A well written story using the given words and suspect it might be true for quite a few people. I love when you say her dress was ORANGE which was akin to his face. Now I can really imagine this to be the case. Yes very sad for wives or husband with their other halves who have to put up with a person like you described David

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