Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Sunday, 28 February 2021

Sunday Selections #522

 



Sunday Selections was originally brought to us by Kim, of Frogpondsrock, as an ongoing meme where participants could post previously unused photos languishing in their files.
 
Huge thanks to Cie who gave me this wonderful Sunday Selections image.
 
The meme was then continued by River at Drifting through life.  Sadly she has now stepped aside (though she will join us some weeks), and I have accepted the mantle. 
 
The rules are so simple as to be almost non-existent.  Post some photos under the title Sunday Selections and link back to me. Clicking on any of the photos will make them embiggen. 
 

I usually run with a theme.  This week I am (mostly) staying close to home and sharing some of the things that have delighted me here.

There were of course visiting birds...



We are lucky enough to have both long and short beaked corellas visit on a regular basis.  Both of them enjoy the seed we put out and the long-beaks are also very fond of the apples we supply.  Sadly they both (like the sulphur crested vandals) enjoy ripping leaves and branches from the camellias.
 
 We often see Rainbow Lorikeets as well.  According to the bird books they are outside of their preferred territory.  They are obviously not literate.  Mind you I expect that climate change has something to do with the shift in their range - which does not make me happy.


The king parrots are also regulars - and also very welcome.

The garden also continues to give me joy.



I know that not all of you will be as intrigued by the zig-zag spider webs as I am.  They are built by the St Andrew's Cross Spider and apparently their webs often include a full or partial cross in the centre (which I didn't see).

Then to more traditional garden joy.









This cactus justifies its place on our veranda for one day every year.

The remarkably phallic bud bursts into bloom at dusk and lasts for twenty four hours before closing and falling off.  It is sweet scented and something I watch and wait for every year.  This year I trotted out with the camera several times documenting its progress.
 


I really enjoyed watching the sun setting as that spectacular cactus flowered too.  I am a very lucky woman.

These last photos are the exception to my 'at home' theme.  I saw the tear-off haiku on a public notice board and immediately thought of Kylie, of JC and of rather a lot of people who have mastered something which is beyond me.

I love that there was only one tear off left - and both Kylie and JC have certainly written haiku that I like more.  I will watch the notice board to see whether more are posted.  I hope so.  I really hope so.



 I hope that you all have wonderful, healthy, happy weeks.

158 comments:

  1. you live in a paradise, so many colorful birds and lovely plants

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    1. Linda Starr: Thank you. Mind you, plenty of people would disagree. My city is widely condemned as duller than ditchwater.

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    2. But you have those views, the birds, the plants and the kangaroos, all close by.

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    3. River: I am quite happy here, but just the same Canberra does have a reputation for being boring.

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  2. This may be your best post EVER! We loved the birds and the bloom and the zig zagg-y web too!

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  3. Oh my gosh, the birds, the sunset , the lovely gesture of haiku available to share, but man oh man, that spider web, now that is utterly amazing! Wow wow wow,

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    1. Laurie: Isn't it a stunner? I was so glad that the zigs and zags showed up in the photos.

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  4. That spiderweb is really cool. And with a cross in the middle? Extra cool.

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    1. Alex J. Cavanaugh: I will keep looking for one that has a cross in the middle.

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  5. Beautiful Parrots, excellent cacti, they are brilliant EC.

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    1. Bob Bushell: We love them and I am glad that you liked them too.

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  6. THose spiders' webs had me guessing .. I never saw such a wonderful sight before. I love spiders ;) And always admire the webs. Zig zag webs are totally new to me.
    And those colourful birds! and a cactus in the garden ... sigh. You live in a wonderful place!
    My dream would be to see it live .. but I'd have to win the lottery first.

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    1. Charlotte (MotherOwl): I am fascinated by spider architecture and to my shame had not noticed the zig-zag webs before. Aren't they amazing?
      If ever you do win the lottery the birds, the garden, the spiders and I would be very happy to see you.

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  7. The beautiful parrots are fascinating to me. I would only ever see them in a cage here. The fact you see them at your house is mind blowing to me.

    That is quite a spider web, so big. It looks like it could catch people.

    How sad it would be to be away from home during that time when the cactus bloomed.

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    1. Marie Smith: We are endlessly grateful to see so many avian birds. Most days we see at least seven or eight different species of native birds.
      They are close up photos of the spider web - it really isn't a people trap.
      And yes, I would hate to miss the cactus's rare foray into flower.

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  8. I have too many over-active spiders around here. Some webs they weave are as thick as ropes!

    I love my over-active birds, though...and yours, too! :)

    I hope all is well with you, EC...have a good week ahead. Take care. Cuddles to Jazz. :)

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    1. Lee: I am fascinated by spiders and their webs. I don't think we have too many - but himself would argue the point. Thank you. I hope that you and your furry overlords have a wonderful week.

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  9. Beautiful post. Wishing you a wonderful week

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    1. e: Thank you. I hope you sleep cycle is settling again.

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  10. I've never seen rainbow lorikeets. Love the colors.

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    1. Jamie Ghione: They are stunners aren't they? Noisy, bullies, and beautiful.

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  11. I have never seen such spider webs, and I too am enchanted by the zig-zag pattern. And that incredible cactus flower, you captured it perfectly. Thank you so much! :-)

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    1. DJan: I feel very remiss that I had never noticed the zig-zag before. I will keep my eyes open and look for more wonders.

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  12. Those king parrots are so handsome and the spider web is amazing. I've never seen anything like it.

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    1. Andrew: The King Parrots are lovely birds aren't they? Demanding, but lovely. I am so pleased that I noticed that web - and that the photos came out.

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  13. This spider,Argiope keyserlingi, in particular, is known for its X of webbing. Generally thought to be stabilamenta, probably improve the catch rate. I'll find a link... https://www.facebook.com/ABCTV/videos/475694300477081

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    1. dinahmow: Your link takes me to the work of a very talented textile artist. Her work blew me away - but there was not a spider to be seen.

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    2. I apologise for that. This is link you should have seen https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Argiope_keyserlingi

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    3. dinahmow: Not a problem. The textile workers creations are amazing. It seems (and I could be wrong) that the zig-zags might by part of the cross.

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  14. This is a great post - the spider-webs are fascinating, and I love the cactus flower (when we lived in Christchurch I had over 3,000 cacti in a big glasshouse *sigh*).
    The corella really appeals to me, with its kind eye and gentle smile, but the other birds are lovely too.
    And the haiku is very good indeed - it's a keeper, isn't it?
    Have an exceptionally good week, EC!

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    1. Alexia: 3000 cacti? That would have been a sight to see. We have a few, but nothing like that number. Corellas wear blue eye make up better than any person I have ever seen.
      Have a wonderful week. Are you still hanging out for rain? We could certainly do with some.

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    2. I would immediately send you bucket-loads if I could manage it. We have had a very strange summer this year, and I'm feeling rather shortchanged...
      I was a huge fan of cacti and succulents, belonged to a group of collectors, and spent many happy evenings pottering in the glasshouse. When we moved to the North Island I had to leave them all behind - and of course we had 2 small children then, one 3 months old and the other 2 years... somehow, there wasn't time for pottering any more :)
      I hope you have a very pleasant week, with liberal rain showers!

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    3. Alexia: It has been an odd summer here too. Damper than usual, cooler than usual (both of which I liked). However as it draws to a close the temperatures have increased and the rain decreased.

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  15. If the cactus could
    He would be zigzagging, too
    Just ask the parrots

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    1. Sean Jeating: That particular cactus has vicious spikes. There are large one which go deep into unwary flesh and tiny hairs which break off and fester. On the occasions when I have carelessly come too close I certainly zig and zag. And turn the air blue.

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    2. Lederhosen, ankle length :)
      and a leather long sleeved shirt too?

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    3. River: They would help. Walking past it I have spiked myself more than once.

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  16. ‘Looking up’ the new to me spider Mr Google informed me the male came sometimes lose a leg while mating.....but is capable of growing a new one!!
    https://www.backyardbuddies.org.au/backyard-buddies/st-andrews-cross-spiders

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    1. Cathy: I wonder how long it takes for a leg to grow back? Thank you for the link - I didn't spot much zigging or zagging on the pictured web though.

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  17. Everything is beautiful about this post, the beautiful birds, amazzzing spider web, glorious cactus blossom, and to finish, a wonderful sunset. Thanks for sharing your rare to us treasures.
    Hugs, Julia

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    1. Julia: I am so very glad that others enjoy the things which delight me. Thank you.

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  18. I love the photos of the blooming cactus. I'm so happy that you enjoy nature to the extent you do. Mostly, I'm happy that you share your joys with us. I enjoy all the pictures. Thank you.


    Though I like to write poetry, haiku is a form I struggle with.
    Hope you have a wonderful weeek.

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    1. Myrna R. I really enjoy your poetry and, given your skills, I am surprised that you struggle with haiku.
      I am so glad that you are not sick of my photos of the natural world.

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  19. I am happy that this Sunday my eyes are comforted by photos of beautiful birds. I was surprised to see the shape of the cactus flower which is very mixed with the shape of the 'Wijaya Kusuma' flower in my country.

    Regards.

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    1. Himawan Sant: Captain Google shows me that your Wijaya Kusuma is very, very similar (and probably the same species) as my night flowering cactus. They are beautiful aren't they.

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  20. Thank you for some wonderful Sunday Selections.
    Always a joy to see the variety of visiting birds you have and they are so colourful.
    I do like the spiders web too and the sun setting views are just gorgeous.

    Have a good week and a happy month of March.
    Sending my good wishes across the miles.

    All the best Jan

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    1. Lowcarb team member ~Jan: Thank you so much. I hope that spring is edging closer and closer to you.

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  21. Me encanto tu jardín y las telarañas. Te mando un beso
    Enamorada de las letras

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  22. How comfortable so many of us would be at home here.

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    1. Joanne Noragon: What a lovely thing to say. Thank you.

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  23. Rainbow Lorikeets are cool looking birds.

    And you need to google "spider webs on drugs". I was wondering if there was anything on the internet about them. Sheesh. They're everywhere.

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    1. Mike: Rainbow Lorikeets are spectacular. We get small flocks of them most days. I did see the link to spiders on drugs and groaned. Yet another thing we should leave alone.

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  24. Brilliant post love the webs and the Rainbow Lorikeets sometimes visit our trees...xx

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    1. aussie aNNie: You are much closer to the rainbow lorikeets preferred territory. They are a wonderful splash of colour aren't they?

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  25. Such lovely birds and that flower is worth the wait.

    What a fascinating spider, i would love to see those zigzag webs in person (i am a fan of spiders).

    My selections are over here.

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    1. messymimi: I am very happy to wait for that bloom. I agree, it IS worth the wait. I am looking forward to your Selections too.

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  26. I have never (NEVER!) seen a zigzag web before, that's truly amazing! The third cactus photo, where the flower is just beginning to open, reminds me of E.T.
    How I wish our rainbow lorikeets would come home and stay. I see them so much less than when I first moved here. There were dozens in a tree near Woolie's last weekend, they blended in so well we couldn't see them, but we sure did hear them and the ground beneath is carpeted with tiny green gumnuts.
    Your sunsets are wonderful, one more reason to live further away from the city.

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    1. River: Would you believe I have never seen ET? I really don't do movies. We used to only see rainbow lorikeets occasionally but they are regulars now - which is lovely.

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  27. Your photos are again so incredibly beautiful and one again I am left with bird envy!
    I usually get spider webs like that in the fall, just before Halloween, which is extremely timely!

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    1. Anne in the kitchen: Thank you. I cannot remember ever seeing the zig zag webs before - and will keep my eyes peeled.

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  28. In what way do you think climate change has affected the range of the beautiful Rainbow birds?

    Love,
    Janie

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    1. Janie Junebug: We are warmer in my city (mostly) than we used to be, summer and winter. Warmer and usually drier. The rainbow lorikeets used to be coastal birds but they have moved inland.

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  29. Never seen a zig zag web before. Now that series of shots of the cactus opening into full bloom is amazing. Wouldn't it have been terrible if you had missed it. I was in hospital last week having collapsed and thought if it had been my cacti, I would have so disappointed to have missed it.

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    1. Margaret Birding For Pleasure: I knew you had been in hospital and hope you have completely recovered. IF I had been away, himself would have had stringent instructions to keep a watch out and take lots of photos.

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  30. the cute bird and i hope can hear it's voice....

    the flower is very beautiful (^ω^)

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    1. Gustyanita Pratiwi: Welcome and thank you. Very few of our native birds are precisely musical, and none of the ones I featured here this week are songsters. They are beautiful though.

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  31. FBULOUS POST!! The birds and the cactus flower are amazing-- but so is the web!

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    1. Bill: Thank you. I am so very lucky - but so are you. You see wonders daily.

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  32. Dear Ec
    Your garden birds are so colourful and cheering. The zig zag web is amazing and somethig I have not seen before. Your cactus photos are lovely too - that was a great idea to document the flower opening.
    Have a lovely week and take care.
    Best wishes
    Ellie

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    1. Ellie Foster: Thank you. Have you had the vaccine yet? You must be watching your garden with intense excitement at the moment.
      I was blow away by how fast the bloom developed. I couldn't (quite) see it open with the naked eye, but it came close.

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  33. EC, your world is so very different from mine. I'd LOVE to see a Lorikeet. We have parrots in the states, but I have never seen a King Parrot before. Your photos are superb, but I was saddened to see that these Lorikeets may be changing habitats due to climate change.

    I was amazed by the zig-zag spider web. Something else that is unique to my world. Your photos were stunning, even for those who are not fond of spiders.

    You must have stayed up a full 24 hours to take successive photos of that cactus flower. It is stunning, especially as it progressed through its life cycle. What an impressive collection of photos.

    Like you, I don't "get" Haiku. I wrote one once and it took me two weeks to create it. Never again. But I appreciate those who find it so easy. And I found your photos sharing your find compelling.

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    1. Bleubeard and Elizabeth: While the rainbow lorikeets habitat has expanded they seem to be doing well (which sadly is not true of all our native wildlife). I didn't stay up quite 24 hours but did go out multiple times to capture the cactus unfolding.
      I am glad to hear that someone else struggles with haiku. I love to read them but my only attempts were definite fails.

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    2. How long did the flower take to open, Child?

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    3. neena maiya (guyana gyal): I suppose it took eight hours or so from the time when it was evident that 'this is it' until the flower fully opened.

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  34. The birds which are free in your garden I can only see in private houses or a zoo. The flowers are beautiful !

    https://gattinawritercramps.blogspot.com/2021/02/sunday-selection_28.html

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    1. Gattina: I am very, very glad that these birds fly free. And equally glad that they are regular visitors. I am off to see your Sunday Selections now - thank you for joining us again.

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  35. Hi EC - delightful range of photos ... wonderful comment to be watching your phallic bud burst forth ... presents lots of thought processes and I can certainly imagine sitting in your garden 'forever laughing' at that comment - as we chat away - well between guffaws.

    That Spider's web and its owner would get me talking too - I've never heard of them before .. extraordinary is nature. Those rainbow lorikeets are special ... as you note - but the corellas know which side their apple is marked! Take care and have a good week - I seem to think I have work to do ahead during the month. Cheers - Hilary

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    1. Hilary Melton-Butcher: I would love to spend time in the garden with you (or indeed anywhere). I am sure there would be a lot of laughter, which is always a winner.
      Isn't that zig zag web fascinating. Himself loathes spiders but did agree when I dragged him out that it was worth a look.
      You do indeed have work here this month. Thank you so much for providing the Words for Wednesday prompts. I have some work too - I should get off my fundament and prepare the posts...

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  36. Interesting post from start to finish, Sue. Please convey my very best regards to my avian amigos, vandals or not! The spider web is truly fascinating; the range of styles of web-building spiders is remarkable. The closest we get to the intricate structure you find in your garden are by spiders in the genus Argiope, but nothing as elaborate as the one here. There will be more than birds to occupy my attention if I ever make it back down under!

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    1. David M. Gascoigne: I do hope that you can get back under (sooner rather than later). I was pretty certain that you would also be intrigued by the web and glad that I wasn't wrong.

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  37. I'm definitely not a spider person, but my goodness, I sure have never seen any spiderwebs that loo like that! Pretty amazing! Such lovely birds too! Hope you are feeling well. Hugs, RO

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    1. RO: Himself feels as you do about spiders. He hates them. However even he agreed that this web was interesting.
      I hope you have a healthy and happy week. And all the weeks to come.

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  38. Colourful birds - I wish some of ours were like that.

    I hate spiders - even our benignn ones in the UK. Over there I would be terrified of every web I saw.

    :o)

    Cheers

    PM

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    1. Plastic Mancunian: Many of your birds have beautiful voices - which ours mostly don't. I really don't know which of us got the better end of that deal. The bite of these spiders would cause you no difficulties. Which is true of most of our spiders.

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  39. I've never seen a zig-zag spiderweb! Thank you for not showing the spider that it belongs to... although now I am curious. :)
    I don't have an appreciation for cactus in general. Too bad they don't flower more often to give them a boost in acceptance.
    Your birds are always a welcome sight to me. So much beauty in your garden!
    Stay healthy, my wonderful friend!

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    1. River Fairchild: The zig zag architect was in hiding or I probably would have inflicted photos of it on you all. I am endlessly fascinated by them.
      I do like cacti as well but for most of the year this one is simultaneously dull and vicious.
      The garden is a work in progress - and is not helped by the beautiful birds.
      You stay safe and well too dear friend.

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  40. The Rainbow Lorikeets is beautiful, as are the other birds too. Your garden is always a delight to visit. Sad that the cactus bloom is only for 24 hours, but it does make a wonderful burst for its time. Stay safe, health and happy my friend.

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    1. Mason Canyon: As I said in the post I am a lucky woman - though I would love to be able to see other birds (and other gardens) across the world. You stay safe happy and well too please. And keep reading and waving temptation my way.

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  41. You are just too sweet to think of me, and other haiku writers, when you saw this. I only do the 5/7/5 haiku, and this one is 3/5/4 which I have never tried. I know you could do it too if you wanted. It's just counting syllables, and making a visual with the words. Those birds.....oh my! I wish we had such color here in our wild population. We have awesome birds, but the color..............

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    1. J C: When I have attempted haiku the result has been clumsy, stilted and forced. I so admire people like you who can make the words sing. I am quite certain that oh my and more would fall from my mouth if ever I was lucky enough to see 'your' birds.

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  42. My favourite birds!!!!
    I have never seen a web like that.
    The flowers are so exotic and beautiful.
    Happy week!

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    1. Caterina: I like too many birds to have favourites but I am so grateful to see these regularly. Have a wonderful week.

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  43. Oh those photos of the colorful birds just make me so happy. I cannot believe how such creatures can exist in a world like ours. I wish they would fly over here to Hawaii. God bless!

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    1. gigi-hawaii: The birds are a joy aren't they? Mind you I am quite certain that some of yours would delight me as much as these. Perhaps more because they would be (to me) a rare treat.

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  44. I am envious of you for the flowers and birds you enjoy so often. I love the generousity of the tear-off haiku page. What fun!

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    1. Susan - of every moment: I loved the tear off haiku too, and was very pleased that others obviously did too. There were other pages up on the notice board where all of the haiku had gone to other homes...

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  45. Fascinating photos. There are green parakeets in London and they are spreading West and North.
    I like the haiku. Describing things just so

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    1. gz: Welcome and thank you. I believe that parakeets have successfully colonised San Francisco as well. I admire haiku and their creators. A lot.

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  46. For some reason my comments are not posting today. I loved the birds though and the spider webs.

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    1. Mary Kirkland: I am sorry that you are having comment woes at the moment and glad that this one went through. I suspect you are having to prove (repeatedly) that you are not a robot at the moment. Sigh.

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  47. Wow, colourful birds, gorgeous flowers, and haikus - what a treat! I was fascinated by the spiderwebs, too. Hubby walked by as I was studying them, and commented, "Drunk spiders?"

    I had to laugh at your comment about the phallic cactus flower. Hubby likes to grow amaryllis (indoors), and he brought the sprouting bulbs out of the basement a couple of weeks ago. Talk about phallic! We joke about presiding over a "penis garden" that has to be turned once a day so they don't all bend toward the window. But the flowers are spectacular! :-)

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    1. Diane Henders: An earlier commentator queried drugged rather than drunk spiders. And it seems that researchers HAVE drugged spiders and studied their webs. I emphatically do not approve.
      I suppose it isn't surprising that some plants do indeed look like sexual organs. Many of them (most) do require both genders before they will bloom. I would love to see your penis garden - which sounds all wrong but you know what I mean.

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    2. LOL! Yep, I know what you mean. I'll likely post a photo on my blog this week. :-)

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    3. Diane Henders: I look forward to it.

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  48. If I had birds like you have in your garden, I would probably have to declare bankruptcy because I would spend all my money on bird food.

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    1. Starting Over, Accepting Changes - Maybe: We spend a considerable amount of money on bird food - and don't begrudge it for a moment.

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  49. I didn't see the phallic shape until you mentioned it! the pure white of that cactus flower is special.
    Thanks for your compliments on my haiku, I'm finding that doing something every day means some are a complete fail but some are really good.
    Tear off haiku, interesting, it's a bit like a fortune cookie

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    1. kylie: Perhaps it is just my mind. That cactus is a beauty and I really do look forward to it every year.
      A LOT of your haiku fall into the really good category - and I like your fortune cookie analogy about the tear off haiku.

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  50. A delightful post, as all your selections are. Beautiful blooms and birds, pretty skies, the haiku and yes even the webs of your St Andrew's Cross Spider which I find intriguing. Thank you so much for sharing this part of your world.

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    1. DeniseinVA: It is my pleasure - and I am glad that you liked it.

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  51. All magnificent, especially loved the cactus, zigzag spider web and haiku! Always learn a lot from your photos, apart from the soul balm. Much needed right now and much appreciated. Thank you.

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    1. Nilanjana Bose: I think we all need heart balm in generous profusion at the moment. I am very, very glad to have been able to send some your way.

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  52. I thought the spiders web was netting to keep the birds at out, lol silly me. It looks that good.

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    1. Spacer Guy: There are bird eating spiders - who probably spin a very strong web. These skilled architects are after much smaller prey.

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  53. Dear EC, thank you once again for sharing with us the birds and the flowers and sunsets of Australia--or that part of the continent on which you dwell. As to the haiku--I've never been able to get to the essence of anything whether with a novel or a sentence or 17 syllables. I'm just too wordy and too unable to find the core. But I so admire those who can. Peace.

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    1. Dee: You under rate yourself. Again. You do find, promote and spread the core, even if haiku is not for you. The single word with which you finish your comments is the key. It is what you wish and hope for the world. Look after yourself please.

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    1. Sue in Italia/In the Land Of Cancer: So do we.

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  55. Buona serata e felice settimana a te.

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  56. Wow, those webs are cool. I've never seen anything like them. Love your bird visitors. :)

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    1. mail4rosey: We love the birds too - and agree with you about that web.

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  57. Dude, that zigzag spider is amazing! I've never seen webbing like that out here. Some of those patterns are better than the stars kids draw. That spider should be designing trapper-keepers for school!

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    1. John Wiswell: Isn't that web amazing. I have been checking them out every day and am blown away with them. Spider architects are the best.

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  58. All the birds are so beautiful and cute.
    I really like watching Rainbows Lorikeets and King Parrots. It's not easy and you can take pictures of it.
    Cactus flowers are blooming beautifully.
    You are a lucky woman who can see the sunset and can capture the photo directly
    Thank you for taking us on a virtual walk enjoying nature, as if I were enjoying the beauty of the flora and fauna there.
    Have a nice week
    Regards

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    1. Justcherry: Thank you. The birds trust us so taking their photograph is not as difficult as it could be - and I am glad you enjoyed walking with me.

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  59. Where do you live that you have so many amazing birds visiting? They are so gorgeous! That spider web is very intriguing, I've never seen anything like it! beautiful cactus bloom too - awesome!

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    1. Martha: I live in the suburbs of Australia's capital city - and would very much like to see some of the birds which visit other parts of Australia - and the world.

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  60. I love your Rainbow Lorikeets and King Parrots. They are so colorful and beautiful. I have never seen such a thing in my life as the zigzag spider webs. Amazing!

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    1. Strayer: Isn't that web incredible. We love the birds too (as you know). Jazz is pretty fond of them as well - with different motives.

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  61. Todas as fotografias tão cativantes!
    Continuação de uma boa semana!
    Um beijinho viajante!
    Megy Maia☔💮☔

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    1. Megy Maia: Thank you. I hope your week is healthy, happy - and fun.

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  62. Hay espacios como en este caso tu jardín en donde uno desea quedarse toda la vida, disfrutando, sacando fotos, relajándose o simplemente contemplando lo que acontece.
    Cada ave es única como esos loritos reyes o arco iris, cada flor, cada planta, árbol, semilla nos ofrece a la vista un espectáculo diferente y sobre todo prometedor.Quedé asombrada con las telarañas que tampoco habia visto.. y tengo un cactus que creo es el mismo que muestras..entiendo y felicito que hayas seguido su proceso y lo hayas plasmado en fotos, porque en verdad es maravilloso.Te deseo de corazon un hermoso dia!!! Abrazo grande !!!

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    1. eli mendez: Thank you. I would love to see your cactus in bloom too - and isn't that web an incredible thing? Have a healthy, happy and wonderful week.

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  63. Good morning, and how funny but I do enjoy a good visit to the scrap yard, well some, they are so very interesting. Your photos are a delight, they are the sweetest birds to see living the good life. Enjoy your week and keep smiling!

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    1. 21 Wits: Scrapyard? You have lost me. If you mean the web I took it outside the kitchen door. Have a truly wonderful week yourself.

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  64. I love that Australian king parrot photo, Look so cute.

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    1. Alex Sierra: Welcome and thank you. They are cute.

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  65. Such a beautiful post EC!!!!! I love seeing your birds! That cactus flower is magical! Wow!! Truly love your sunset sky photos!!! Love that poem too! Great post! Big Hugs!

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    1. Magic Love Crow: You are always so kind. Thank you.

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  66. Now I have my computers back up and running I've been able to check into my favourite blog! The web shots are brilliant - so interesting. I've got an orb spider web on my veranda that comes and goe,s though I'm yet to find the spider. And that cactus! Wow. At first look I thought it was a protea. Thank you for sharing details of this beautiful world

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    1. Kim: We do live in a beautiful world don't we? And you share beauty each and every week. Thank you.

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  67. Such glorious colour in those birds!! I've never seen spider webs like that - very cool!!

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    1. Jemi Fraser: Aren't those webs amazing. Having spotted them I am now looking at all the spider webs I see much more closely. Mad woman and camera dances are involved. Of course.

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  68. Wonderful bird shots! And lovely to see the sun. Also - how amazing to have those take-away haikus!

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    1. Lady Fi: The tear off haikus were great weren't they? When next I go that way I will have a look and see whether they are being replaced. I hope so.

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  69. Oh that Rainbow Lorikeet is a beautiful bird. I'd be so excited to see one in my garden. Love the unusual spiders web, but not the spider. :D

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    1. LL Cool Joe: We delight in the rainbow lorikeets too. I haven't yet seen the architect of the zig zag web, though he/she has been very busy.

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    2. Yeahhh, that zig zag web is something else...I've never seen that before.

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    3. neena maiya (guyana gyal): It is gorgeous - and there are a lot of them about. Which I am finally noticing.

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  70. The birds and flowers are lovely. I hope you had a wonderful week and will have a good weekend.

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  71. The corella in the second and third pic is smiling away! So cute! I remember once, I saw about 20 of them in a plant, and I went up to them and they came closer to peek at me because I was trying to imitate them. I was so amused.

    Wow. I've never seen a cactus flower so pretty! And with perfume too. Gosh. Only once a year. What a treat, eh?

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    1. neena maiya (guyana gyal): It IS a treat. And annual treat. Love the mental image of you interacting with the corellas.

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