Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Sunday, 7 February 2016

Sunday Selections #262

Sunday Selections was originally brought to us by Kim, of Frogpondsrock, as an ongoing meme where participants could post previously unused photos languishing in their files.
 
The meme is now continued by River at Drifting through life.  The rules are so simple as to be almost non-existent.  Post some photos under the title Sunday Selections and link back to River.  Clicking on any of the photos will make them embiggen.
 
Like River I usually run with a theme.  My father was a damaged, difficult and complicated man.  A difficult and complicated man who made some very beautiful jewellery as a hobby.  A little while ago my nephew's wife asked me to send her some photos of his work.  This week I finally got round to it, and thought I would post some of the photos as a tribute to him.


The rings are all my mother's.  My hands are bigger than hers and I cannot wear any of them.  I bit my fingernails for years and he flatly refused to make me rings until I stopped.  Some of the earrings are mine, and some hers. Note that the piece which goes through your ear is always in keeping with the overall design.  Not for him a simple post.   Father almost always worked in silver and, probably because of his influence, I prefer it to gold.



There is a large garnet set into this ring.



A moonstone. 


 

A stud.  I mourn (twenty years later) losing the other one.


Amber.



Amethyst.


He was not a happy chappy when I told him this brooch he made for my mother made me think of a slug.  It does though.


    

143 comments:

  1. What beautiful work!!! I like it all. I like gold but I, too, favor silver and stones. Can you find an apporprite chain and wear the rings as pendants?

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    1. Bookie: Wearing them on a chain is a thought. Thank you.

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  2. Beautiful designs, I especially like the amber ring!(I have a collection of amber that hubs gave me over the years.) Your father had a good sense of style with the flowing lines of his creations. Glad you decided to share his work with us.

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    1. D.G. Hudson: Every envelope and every piece of paper had designs sketched on them. Some he made, some he didn't. Simplicity was one of his key principals though.

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  3. Beautiful jewelry! I met silversmiths in my career whose work I coveted some of their pieces. I do own a moonstone ring from one couple. My father took up working with the stones he collected in his few retirement years. He cabochoned most stones, although he did facet a few. The cabochons fascinated me; how many stones that treatment makes beautiful for jewelers to set.

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    1. Joanne Noragon: Father made a very detailed display for the local gem club of all the steps involved in creating a cabachon. He set it up at each of their shows and it always attracted a crowd. Facetting was a much later skill he acquired.

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  4. Thank you for sharing this so important and private post. I like your father's work very much; especially his masterpiece: YOU

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    1. Cloudia: I am pretty certain that the work you mention is one he would dearly have loved to reset.

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  5. These pieces are beautiful and they're reminding me of the 70s. When were they made?

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    1. We are: Clamco: Some of them certainly date back to the seventies (or before). He was still making jewellery until he died in the 90s though.

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  6. What interesting and highly skilled work. That must have been a rewarding hobby for him and for all of you.

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    1. Relatively Retiring: He got a lot of fun out of it. And yes, we did benefit.

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  7. I love the jewelry Child. I always wished to take jewelry making classes. Glad you have some of the pieces.

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    1. donna baker: Father taught himself - and later others. Which filled me with awe.

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  8. My goodness! Your father certainly did make beautiful jewellery. Those pieces are wonderful. They're what I like...I'm not into "prissy, flowery" designs in jewellery...if you can understand what I'm trying to describe.

    These pieces created by your father have so much character. In my opinion they are exquisite and unique. That moonstone ring is stunning.

    What cherished heirlooms they must be.

    I hope your week treats you and The Skinny One kindly, EC...cuddles to the furry ones. :)

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    1. Lee: His work certainly was unique. I am glad that others like it too.
      A very, very busy week ahead here. The cats and the smaller portion will be more 'laxed. I hope you and your furry overlords have a lovely one.

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  9. The beauty of these pieces of jewellery is enhanced by the very thoughtful and clever close-ups. Thanks.

    Greetings from London.

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    1. A Cuban in London: Thank you. I did notice that some of them are filthy. When/if I wear them they will get a good clean.

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  10. Do you wear these masterpieces often? It appears that your mother's rings can be resized to fit your fingers

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    1. Sue in Italia/In the Land of Cancer: I wear some of the earrings. I know that the rings could (probably) be resized, but for complicated reasons it hasn't happened. My relationship with both of my parents was challenging and I am not yet ready to wear my mother's jewellery. At the moment it lives at the back of the wardrobe.

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    2. I have a ring given to me in odd circumstances and it grieves me to look at it. Somebody once said "just wear it, it looks pretty on your finger"
      It's not really that simple, eh?

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    3. kylie: No. I can appreciate the beauty, but I am just not ready to wear them. And may never be. Neither am I ready to let them go.

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  11. Your father's craftsmanship is stunning and unique. He has left a beautiful and memorable legacy, one that I am sure you treasure.

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    1. CountryMum: Thank you. His legacy lingers in so many ways.

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  12. Great stuff thank you for sharing
    I'll share too

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    1. Martin Kloess: Thank you. On both counts.

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  13. I to like silver, I have a black opal ring thats it, oh and a watch.
    Love to look at rings and other stuff but can't wear it much it causes skin reactions.
    Merle..............

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    1. Merlesworld: I wear earrings often. Other jewellery much less often. I do like to look though. Does all jewellery cause skin reactions? I have found the purer the metal the less often the reaction.

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  14. Not a happy chappy but an artisan. Some lovely pieces there and thank you for sharing this post.

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    1. DeniseinVA: He would love to be described as an artisan.

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  15. Dear EC
    Beautiful jewellery even if it gives you mixed feelings. I am a 'silver' jewellery person - my only gold piece is my wedding ring. I am contemplating buying myself a silver open cuff bracelet soon...
    Best wishes
    Ellie

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    1. Ellie Foster: I hope you will show us your open cuff bracelet when you get it.

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  16. I like all these jewelleries. I think your father was very skilful with his hands.
    Hugs

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    1. orvokki: He was. He had huge hands and they looked clumsy. And appearances were deceptive.

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  17. They are all very very lovely. And so precious because he made them.
    I very much enjoy silver in all it's forms. A cousin in England has been learning silversmithing and has made some beautiful things, jewellery, spoons, even a silver plate.

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    1. Shammickite: There is something about the sheen of silver isn't there? Soft, subtle, beautiful.

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  18. Lovely pieces, made more lovely by being so personal.And, as the page loaded, I said "OOh! Lovely" and you said "slug."
    I wore my opal ring last week...when my father bought it for me, as I was leaving home, there was not time to have it re-sized and the jeweller added a "keeper" Now, my old-lady fingers are so sausagey I can just get it on!

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    1. dinahmow: I did say slug - but it didn't mean that I didn't appreciate its beauty. I hear you on the sausage fingers front.

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  19. They are quite beautiful. I don't wear jewelry much, don't have the clothes to look nice as it is, so don't bother with jewelry either, but those are nice pieces!

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    1. Strayer: I wear earrings often regardless of what else I am wearing. And my mother wore the jewellery Father made everywhere - even when gardening.

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  20. Some amazing jewelry and a special part of your father's legacy.

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    1. Alex J. Cavanaugh: They are indeed a special part of this legacy. A more concrete part than a lot of it.

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  21. I love them, too! I had to laugh at the slug mention, because, well, it does remind me of one. He was a very talented artist. :-)

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    1. DJan: He was wasn't he? And I am glad someone else can see that slug...

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  22. I love the amber ring. I wonder why he was so unhappy.

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    1. mshatch: He was a German Jew and almost the only survivor from his family. Survivor guilt, the ugliness of much he saw and suppressed grief probably explained a lot of why he was as he was. And who knows, he may have been a difficult person anyway.

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    2. I didn't know, EC, I often wondered how those who survived made out afterwards. That would create horror in one's mind everlasting. Some probably dealt better than others, I would suppose, but I cannot imagine surviving those horrors, while so many did not.

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    3. Strayer: It is only a guess that it was that which made him damaged and difficult. I can't see how it could not. He refused to talk about it though. We are pretty certain that his father died in one of the obscene camps but know nothing more. All he would say is that 'religion costs too much' and that 'there are no winners in war'.

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  23. He was very talented. The ring with the garnet is my favourite. Talented people can often be difficult. Fortunately perhaps, I am not.

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    1. Andrew: Not talented or not difficult? The ring with the garnet is truly spectacular when the light hits it.

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  24. I like Bookie's idea to wear the rings on a chain. What bold, clean lines he used (my preference) and what a treasure for you to have. I have quite a bit of jewellery I never wear but I love to look at it from time to time and remember the givers. And it takes up so little room one can keep it with no guilt. Enjoy.

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    1. jenny_o: I would need to have several more ears, fingers and necks to begin to display the haul. And yes, looking is enough. And sometimes too much.

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  25. I like the moonstone ring and the earrings in the following photo.
    Talented man and a nice tribute to him.
    Shame you can't wear those rings...

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    1. Margaret-whiteangel: I like both of the pieces you mentioned too.

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  26. Beautiful creations. I hope it brought him some amount of solace.

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  27. What talent! Thanks heaps for showing us these lovely things, and for sharing some of the complex feelings you have about them. Silver is my first choice, too, except for my wedding rings, and I love to wear rings more than any other jewellery.

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    1. Alexia: Talent and dedication. He put a lot of work into it.

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  28. I loved the moonstone, but I'm not the type of woman who wears jewelry. It always made me nervous jiggling around on me.

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    1. Pandora Hinkelheimer: Only his earrings jiggle. But jewellery is such a personal decision.

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  29. He was truly a master of both art and form. Gorgeous work. I've worked silver so I know how difficult the symmetry of lines can be. Exquisite pieces!
    Creative people are generally difficult, I think. The mind works in a different pattern. The person is often misunderstood and a loner. And, yes, this is a description of myself. :)

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    1. River Fairchild: It is beautiful isn't it? And he was difficult. I am not certain he was misunderstood though.

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  30. Amber and moonstone are two favourites, your father used them beautifully... the brooch most certainly is a slug though!

    I'm sorry they carry negative associations for you.

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    1. The Cranky: Welcome and thank you. I am a big fan of amber and moonstones too. The blue moonstone rather than the pink. The emotions attached to both parents and their creations is probably better described as mixed than negative. Though the negatives are certainly there.

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  31. Such lovely pieces! Your dad was very talented. I like the amber ring best, love the colour of the stone.

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    1. River: And the setting doesn't 'take over' either. Which is true of all his pieces.

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  32. Replies
    1. Lux G.: I would never have thought to describe them as rustic, but you are right 'made in a plain and simple fashion' is a completely accurate description.

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  33. My mom would go wild over these! The second-from-last is a very slick yet striking design. Are the outer red circles equidistant from the center one, or spaced slightly differently? The latter would do wonders for snagging the eye.

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    1. John Wiswell: You have an acute eye. The two earrings are identical but the red circles are indeed spaced slightly differently.

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  34. Hi EC - lovely collection you've got with that extra reminder of your parents - your father must have been a wonderful craftsman. Love silver too ... but pretty designs away from the normal are what I always look for ... Love being able to see John's comment about 'snagging the eye' with the design ... I'm not sure I would have noticed.

    Cheers and have a good week - Hilary

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    1. Hilary Melton-Butcher: I was super impressed at his eye. I have known these earrings for a very long time and I won't admit how long it took me to notice what he picked up in one brief look.

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  35. He was very talented indeed, did he just do it as a hobby or to sell? And I agree, it does look like a slug. :D

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    1. LL Cool Joe: It was a hobby. I only remember him selling one piece.
      He was learning to facet, and was practising on a beer bottle (a Reschs beer bottle). He brought a piece inside to show it off. A visitor asked what it was. Reschite he told her. 'Oh yes' she said 'Very rare and mined in South Africa'. He loathed pretentious know-it-alls and when she asked him to set it in a ring for her he did. And never told her that she was wearing a piece of beer bottle on her finger.

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    2. Hahahaha. For a second, I thought the person was saying that the beer bottle was very rare and mined in South Africa."

      When she goes to check out the value of the ring one day...haha...

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    3. neena maiya (guyana gyal): On the rare occasions he sold his work he only charged for the cost of the materials used. If she does (or has) get the ring valued she won't be rich but wasn't robbed.

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  36. That is such a neat idea to share photos of special jewelry.

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  37. great style in all that jewelry, love them all even the slug

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    1. Linda Starr: I like some of them more than others, but the slug is very, very stylish.

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  38. So pretty all of them, except now I'm seeing a slug each time I look at that brooch. Thanks for sharing. LOVED looking at each one. I understand mourning the lost stud.

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    1. T Powell Coltrin: If only all slugs were so elegant...

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  39. He was truly talented.

    What did he do with the jewellery he made? Did he keep them? Sell? Give away? Or made them only for your mother?

    The earrings, ohhhh, the earrings! [Can you tell I'm an earrings-gal?]

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    1. neena maiya (guyana gyal): See my response to LL Cool Joe. I can only remember him selling one piece. He made them for family (mostly my mama) and for friends. And I am an earring addict myself.

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  40. Replies
    1. Author R. Mac Wheeler: A bit slow here this morning. Your comment had me wondering...

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  41. They are beautiful. And I understand having difficult relationships with family members. You aren't alone in dealing with the damage that they do that lasts a life time. My grandfather carved some of the most beautiful pieces and he was a cruel and horrible man. I always wondered how an evil soul could create such beauty.

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    1. Sonya Ann: We like to believe a lot of things about family - including some things which just aren't true. Family is much like the rest of the world. A very mixed bag. My father wasn't cruel or horrible - though some of the things he did/said were. Damaged. And difficult.

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  42. Really great pieces. And, for the record, what's not to like about a slug? I'd have taken that as a compliment.

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    1. Bea: It really wasn't meant as a criticism, more as an observation. He took it badly though. And probably thirty years (or more) later I still think of it as the slug brooch. And admire it.

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  43. Beautiful pieces--I have given most of my jewelry to my granddaughters!!

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    1. fishducky: What lucky granddaughters you have.

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  44. Hello, your father made lovely pices of jewelry and very talented. Thanks for sharing, enjoy your day!

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    1. eileeninmd: Welcome and thank you. He was indeed talented. And hard-working.

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  45. Gosh, I admire his talent. I love turquoise, but have very few pieces.

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    1. Terri @ Coloring Outside the Lines: I do too. It was all self-taught too. Which I found amazing. To teach himself such intricate work...

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  46. Wow. All these are lovely. Your father was able to create beautiful things. Glad you still have them.

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  47. Beautiful stuff! I need to play with more close up shots. Thanks for the unintended encouragement.

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    1. Jono: I am really looking forward to seeing your close-ups.

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  48. The jewelry is really beautiful. Your father certainly had a rare talent and good eye. I really like the brooch and the copper colored earrings.

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    1. Ginger Dawn Harman: Thank you. Those copper coloured earrings are made of copper. And lovely.

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  49. The jewellery is gorgeous and I am glad you get to wear some of it Sue. Nice tribute to your Dad, however troubled he was (mine was too).

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    1. Carol: Thank you. Their troubles trouble us too don't they?

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  50. What a talented man, and how wonderful you still have so many treasures that he lovingly crafted.
    My father in law was a survivor (the only one in his family) a German Jew as well. He never talked much about it until his latter years, and then we understood....

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    1. Karen: Father never would/could talk about it. Which doesn't surprise me. I am so glad that your father in law could. It must have helped.

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  51. I do love how the pieces going in your ear follow the rest of the design. Not sure I'd have noticed it if you didn't mention it, but that is a cool feature. He did lovely work!

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    1. mail4rosey: Thank you. He did. And was a perfectionist.

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  52. Wow! Your father was a fabulous silversmith.
    His designs are beautiful - um, except for one... I too think it looks like a slug. A very pretty slug tho' :)

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    1. Vicki: It is a pretty slug, but a slug it is. Goodness he was peeved at me that day...

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  53. How wonderful that you have these pieces. I prefer silver, too. True treasures!

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    1. Lynn: I am very grateful to have these links to him - and to my mother. Mixed though the emotions are.

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  54. Self taught, very clever stuff that, and he was clearly superbly talented. For myself, the spiky garnet ring stands out as my favourite. Tis beautiful. it feels like a forties pieces. Thanks for pointing me this way sweetie, and I agree with a few others here, you are without doubt his greatest (partial) creation, though Tis your own self being that has you shining as bright as any silver could. X

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    1. All Consuming: The garnet is an incredible piece. There is also a rutilated quartz ring which doesn't photograph well...
      I am pretty certain that he wouldn't agree about his greatest creation though.

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  55. For some reason I've always preferred silver to gold in my jewelry as well. I really love each piece. Your father was clearly very talented. I enjoyed seeing the photos. :-)

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    1. Debra: Welcome and thank you. Silver has (to me) a soft and more subtle lustre than gold...

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  56. I am a fan of silver too and these pieces are unique and very well done. I love moonstones- so that ring is a favorite of mine. So sorry to hear that you lost one of the studs, maybe you could have the remaining one made into a ring or necklace? That way you could still enjoy it as a re-purposed piece of jewelry.

    Your father was very talented, thanks for sharing his work with us and for sharing a bit about your history (sorry he was difficult).
    ~Jess

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    1. DMS ~ Jess: Thank you. Some day I may see if I can get another jeweller to make another stud. I still wear the single one.
      He was difficult, but I suspect a lot of the pain was his.

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  57. Oh my, EC. He was an amazing artist.

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    1. Sandra Cox: He did good work didn't he?

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    2. He sure did. It's very special when you have beautiful, handmade jewelry by a relative.

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  58. Wow - what beautiful pieces of jewellery!

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  59. I read nearly all the comments--and agree with your father's artistry. My father was a carpenter/ foreman/ curmudgeon of the highest order. But still, he was difficult. Have you considered writing a memoir??

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    1. Patricia A. Laster: There is so much I don't know about him. Virtually nothing from his childhood (to the extent that I know he had aunts, but not if he had siblings). So, no. I am sorry to hear that so many of us know/understand the difficult parent.

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  60. Very lovely items to see in the post and very interesting conversations in the comments. Well done!

    My father was one of the difficult ones; he has been gone nearly 50 years and I still have mixed feelings about him. He worked in an aircraft factory and a few times over the years brought home a ring he had made (on a milling machine? a turret lathe?) so that he would continue to look busy to any roving supervisor who happened by when there was no more actual work to be done. I remember that one of the rings was aluminum and one was titanium. He was so very proud of them. I have no idea where they are today. They were, of course, as child's play compared to what your father created.

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    1. rhymeswithplague: Father was a perfectionist. I am sure there were early pieces - but no-one saw them. Sigh on the mixed feelings front. Very mixed. About both of my parents.

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  61. Hey Sue,

    Yep, I'm finally here and yep, I'm backtracking to this post. Of course, by the time I scrolled all the way down here, I have to scroll all the way back up so I can remember what I was going to write. One moment, please....

    I'm sorry to read your dad was a difficult man. However, the gems of artistry are here for us to marvel at. My dad may or not be alive. Sadly, I don't care.

    Take care and be back in a moment to check your next post...

    Gary

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    1. klahanie: Hi Gary. Lovely to see you here. I am sorry that you too had a difficult relationship with a parent.
      Look after yourself.

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  62. Wonderful jewellery, EC, made by your talented and difficult dad. Family can be very complicated, can't they? I'm pleased you have these beautiful things but I can certainly understand your mixed feelings...

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    1. Carol: Family can be a minefield. With some wonderful benefits as well as the danger.

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  63. Beautiful pieces. I especially like the blue earrings.

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    1. Cindi Summerlin: My mother commented that other people got jewellery to go with a new outfit and she had to get new outfits to go with her jewellery. Poor woman. How she suffered. Not.

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  64. Wow! As a HOBBY? He was tremendously talented. Those pieces are simply beautiful. (Now I know where you got your artistic flair... or some of it, anyway.)

    (I think it looks like a slug, too!)

    Happy weekend!

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    1. Susan: It was indeed a hobby. An obsessive hobby, but a hobby just the same. I certainly got my obsessive nature from my parents. Both of them.

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  65. He may have been a difficult man as many can be but he certainly had an eye for beauty as can be seen in his creations.
    Can you not have the rings enlarged so you can wear them? Just a thought.
    P.S. Yes it is quite slug like but lovely nevertheless.

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    1. Mimsie: Some of them I probably could have enlarged, others would set more of a challenge. Some day. Perhaps.

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  66. EC I'm wondering what the slug is made from. I like how your 'slug'comment reflects your affinity with nature.

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    1. Kim: The slug is enamel over a silver framework. I get so much from nature. Wonder, delight, awe...

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