Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Sunday, 14 February 2016

Sunday Selections #263

Sunday Selections was originally brought to us by Kim, of Frogpondsrock, as an ongoing meme where participants could post previously unused photos languishing in their files.
 
The meme is now continued by River at Drifting through life.  The rules are so simple as to be almost non-existent.  Post some photos under the title Sunday Selections and link back to River.  Clicking on any of the photos will make them embiggen.
 
Like River I usually run with a theme.  This week my theme is distractions.  Welcome distractions.  I am not in a good space physically, mentally or emotionally and all of these things helped.


We took a small excursion to our National Library to see an exhibition called Celestial Empire:  Life in China 1644-1911.  A free exhibition.  It wasn't the best I have seen and photographs of the exhibits were banned but I was blown away by the colours in some of the documents.  Hundreds of years old, and so vivid.


A snippet of information intrigued me too.  Apparently there was a time when China, Japan and Korea shared the same written language...

No photos of the exhibit, but some of the outside of the National Library.




This monkey has been set in place for the Chinese New Year.  I think it is on the grotesque side, and am intrigued by the solar panels.  I assume it lights up at night - and when Enlighten is on in a few weeks we will see...





  The next day we went to the Lifeline book fair.  Do I need any more books?  No.  Have I room for any more books?  No.  Did I buy books?  Of course.  Nearly thirty of them.



As a bonus, Wesley, a memoir written by a woman who shared her life with a Barn Owl for nineteen years, was amazing.  I guzzled it and will read it again.




I have also had some welcome distraction in the garden.  My pineapple lily (eucomis) is in flower.  This link will take you to some more information about it.




There are Bromeliads in flower too.




And we have naked ladies blooming in the back yard too.  Not the usual pink ones which appear to be sulking but some white beauties (also known as Belladonna lilies or Amaryllis).  Naked ladies because they bloom before the leaves appear.




129 comments:

  1. I picture you with stacks of books in your bedroom. I loved your photos as always.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Snowbrush: There are certainly stacks of books there. And elswhere.

      Delete
  2. Replies
    1. Birdie: They are. A necessity. Perhaps not in the quantities in this house though. Perhaps.

      Delete
  3. Replies
    1. fishducky: I hope you enjoy it as much as I and Joanne Noragon did.

      Delete
  4. I am pleased no photography was allowed as your photos are more interesting. You are right. The monkey is grotesque. Why? Wesley sounds like a good read. I take it you have read Seal Morning.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Andrew: What a lovely thing to say. Thank you. Seal Morning? New to me. I may have to explore. Thank you and drat you.

      Delete
  5. I will look for Wesley (of course!)
    That thing is a monkey? Fuglymonkey.
    But a nice little saunter in your back yard.Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. dinahmow: Fuglymonkey is the PERFECT description. I suspect it isn't improved when it is illuminated either.

      Delete
  6. I love a kindred spirit who needs no more books but comes home with a boatload! Well played!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anne in the kitchen: The whole house is a testament to my bookie addiction.

      Delete
  7. Have you ever read That Quail Robert? Is about quail that lived in a house with people! I bet the owl book is good too. I know there are good reasons for not allowing pictures in some places, but sometimes I NEED pictures to help me see the sight all over again!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bookie: That Quail Robert is new to me too. Investigations will follow.
      Slowly we are moving away from the photography ban in lots of places but not here. And the lighting was very dim so flashes would have been essential - which would probably have caused damage. Sigh.

      Delete
  8. We had a barn owl once, "Winston" we called him. My ex found him on the road one night...a car before him had run into the owl. My ex pulled up to tend to the owl and it, the bird, clung on to his hand, so Randall brought him home and we nurtured him until he was fit enough to go off on his merry way. We only had Winston for about a week or so...but he was a beautiful creature and we had been immediately smitten with him.

    I hope you have a wonderful week with your head buried in a book or three, EC. Cuddles to your two furry mates. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lee: I am so glad that Winston could return to a free life. Thank you and Randall.
      Books will be devoured.
      And I hope you and the furry despots have a wonderful week.

      Delete
  9. That is one ugly monkey. I am sorry that you are not in a good place and that next week finds you in a better one.

    Somehow I have failed to see an owl out in the wild. Barn owls would be my best bet though snowy owls would be what I want to see the most.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sue in Italia/In the Land of Cancer: I have very, very rarely seen an owl in the wild. Sigh. Mind you, I haven't done a concentrated owl hunt either.

      Delete
  10. Enjoyed this thank you for this little escape

    ReplyDelete
  11. Every time I come to your blog I learn something new about your country. Thanks, I really appreciate it.

    Greetings from London.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. A Cuban in London: Thank you. Tit for tat though. I learn more about your adopted country with every visit to your blog.

      Delete
  12. Books are a great escape from troubles of all kinds. I'm glad you listened to your heart and bought them.

    Wishing you a better week coming up, my dear EC.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. jenny_o: When the skinny one said he wanted to go to the bookfair it was always a given that I would come too. And succumb. And thank you.

      Delete
  13. Ick the colors of the faceless monkey. Japan, Koreas and China all once shared a written language, now that's interesting and worth some investigation.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Strayer: There was very little detail about it - but I was fascinated too. And wonder how similar they are today. Some overlapping I suspect.

      Delete
  14. "Wesley;" high on my all time favorites list. The dedication of his owner is mind boggling.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Joanne Noragon: Wesley was good wasn't it? And yes, it required total commitment from the person sharing his life. Given that I mourned at his death she must have been shattered.

      Delete
  15. I look forward to your Sunday Selections as they are always so very interesting.

    Hope you are enjoying all your new books.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. CountryMum: Thank you. And I am a bookaholic and definitely enjoying the books.

      Delete
  16. Again a nice Sunday post. It's really interesting to look things from the other side of world. Your flowers are very huge and beautiful.
    Have a happy Valentine's Day.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. orvokki: I love looking at your side of the world too. So very different, and brought so close by the wonders of the blogosphere.
      A Happy Valentine's Day to you too.

      Delete
  17. Wesley has just been added to my To Read list - which is incredibly long! Neither of the 2 libraries I belong to has it, so I may have to buy it...
    The monkey is ghastly.

    Thank you for the flower pics. My son-in-law is a bromeliad nut, so I shall show him the purple flowers - intriguing plants, aren't they?
    Have a good week.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Alexia: Bromeliads are amazing. So varied.
      I hear you on the huge to read list. It is beyond me already but I keep adding to it.

      Delete
  18. You bought thirty books at once? I'm impressed. You read a lot faster than I do, you could probably keep up with my daughter K. I used to read faster, now I have the computer and find reading things here is so much slower. Wish I knew why.
    I love your pineapple lily.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. River: I do read fast. And I neglect other things to read.
      The pineapply lily is a gorgeous thing. Much more subtle than lots of them.

      Delete
  19. Forgot to say how nice looking your museum is! And how much I'd like to see the exhibition.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. River: I like the National Library. It has some stunning stained glass windows too.

      Delete
  20. I would love to see all your books, one week. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Snoskred: All of my books or all of the latest purchases? There are bookcases in most rooms. And almost all of them are stacked two layers deep...

      Delete
  21. I have never seen white naked ladies. (now that sounds awful). We have the pinkish purple ones. I love them. I will have to see if we have the white ones here. Your flower pictures are amazing! Your day out sounds intersting. I will be so glad when winter is over and I can get out more. Though our winter has not been nearly as bad as some parts of the country.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Teresa Hennes: The white ones are much less common. I planted these some years ago and had given up on them. This year they decided they had been in hiding long enough.

      Delete
  22. Replies
    1. Author R. Mac Wheeler: You probably can... but I haven't stopped yet.

      Delete
  23. I laughed about the book fair. Your flowers are so beautiful especially since mine are asleep under the ground. I would enjoy reading the owl book too btw.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. donna baker: I had never heard of it, or seen it before but both the other bloggers who have read it loved it too. And to share your life with an owl would be an incredible privilege.

      Delete
  24. Beautiful flowers and the books looked really interesting. A good read works wonders.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. DeniseinVA: A good book is a necessity. Lots of good books are necessities.

      Delete
  25. I absolutely loved Wesley the Owl. I read it twice and guzzled it both times. :-)

    ReplyDelete
  26. That is one ugly monkey...
    I'll have to look up Wesley the Owl. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. River Fairchild: dinahmow described it as fugly. And she nailed it. I suspect being illuminated won't improve it either.

      Delete
    2. Yes, fugly is a perfect description!

      Delete
  27. I am surprised at the uncanny fact that this beautiful barn owl and my own textile owl, share the same name...
    I'll have to find the book.

    Looking forward to Enlighten images :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Vicki: Wesley is an excellent name for an owl. Any owl. Enlighten (and the balloon festival) are a few weeks away. Many photos will follow. Of course.

      Delete
  28. stunning as always. i don't think i've ever seen a bromeliad bloom in that fashion. i love it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Cindi Summerlin: It is a stunner isn't it?

      Delete
  29. What a butt-ugly fuglymonkey; I can easily imagine children having nightmares about it. Illuminating it would only make it uglier and more frightening. Since both the Japanese and Koreans emigrated from and were heavily influenced by the Chinese, it only makes sense they once shared the same written language.

    Haven't read Wesley, will have to look it up.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The Cranky: I can see the fuglymonkey in a horror movie. And it would give ME nightmares. The, not to point to fine a point on it, emnity between the nations has been so strong for so long I am a bit surprised they shared a written language after the spoken languages drifted apart...

      Delete
  30. A grotesque monkey, books and beautiful flowers in bloom. Sounds perfect to me! Of course, the cynic in me wonders what kind of steaming hell it must be to be producing flowers that beautiful.... I do hope you are finding a cool spot to read your books.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Paper Chipmunk (aka Ellen): The weather has been on the weird side. Hot. Sometimes very bloody hot. Followed by surprisingly cool. Then repeat. Throw a bit of rain into the mix (but not as much as is predicted). Hot again at the moment. For the next week or so.
      Sigh. This too will pass.

      Delete
  31. Don't like the monkey, scary. The flowers are stunners. So are your photos. Sorry to hear you were feeling poorly, but pleased that you got just the distractions you needed. Hope you get to a better place soon.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nilanjana Bose: I don't like the monkey much either. And suspect I won't like it any better illuminated. Thank you for your good wishes.

      Delete
  32. Hi EC - pity about not being able to take photos ... when I can't I get frustrated too at exhibitions .. but can understand. Interesting to have seen the exhibition and probably seen some blurb on the exhibits ... it's a subject I really need to get some insight into.

    The monkey is 'interesting' - I'm not keen on them for some reason ...but it is their year. The bromeliads are superb to see - I've never seen them like this .. so beautiful - then the pineapple lily and the naked ladies .. they are gorgeous too.

    But Wesley the Owl sounds a wonderful book ... so glad you enjoyed it and will read it again ... cheers Hilary

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hilary Melton-Butcher: More and more we ARE allowed to take photos at exhibitions. Mind you when I see people using the opportunity to take selfies my dinosaur self dispairs.
      I am glad you enjoyed my garden distractions - and Wesley was a joy. A joy which made me weep.

      Delete
  33. I just put Wesley the Owl on my wish list for my daughter. I think she'd love it. Thank you for the recommendation!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We are: Clamco: Make sure she has tissues handy.

      Delete
  34. Lovely selection. That book intrigues me..

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Margaret-whiteangel: The book was a most excellent find. I think it was the very last book I picked up, but the first I dived into.

      Delete
  35. I love the photos from the garden, and the first photo you posted my friend.

    I'm no longer who I thought I was, for it was all a lie, for there has been much searching going on in my life which has brought me back to who I truly am, if you'd like to stop by you're welcome to click my name on this comment of mine and it will take you there.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lon Anderson: Thank you. I will be over to visit in a bit. I assume you have changed blogs again.

      Delete
  36. Hello! !
    I am looking forward to always nice blog.
    Japan is "HARU ITIBAN" visited today.
    It is the meaning of the wind to notice the coming of spring in Japan.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ryoma Sakamoto: Welcome and thank you. We are (slowly) moving into autumn here, but I notice all of the changes in season. And marvel at them.

      Delete
  37. How I love exhibitions. I don't see them enough here. It seems they're over before I find out about them as they're not well-advertised.

    That is some kinda monkey, oooh. I'd love to see him all lit up.

    So now there's the Big Banana, the Big Shrimp, the Big Pineapple. There's even a Big Mozzie [Ozzie the Mozzie]. Now there's the Big Monkey :-D

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. neena maiya (guyana gyal): There is also a Big Merino not far from me. I don't think the Big Monkey will last though.
      I will take photos of him next month when he is illuminated (if he is still there).

      Delete
  38. China, Japan and Korea once shared the same written language? I didn't know that. Looks like a fascinating exhibition.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jackie K: Neither did I. I assume that they weren't at the time sharing a spoken language which made it more amazing to me.

      Delete
  39. Eastern history is so rich and beautiful. I have been to a few shows of the like and am always blown away by their art and culture. That monkey, though, is one ugly bugger.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Starting Over, Accepting Changes - Maybe: I agree wholeheartedly - on both counts.

      Delete
  40. what a great adventure. I like the monkey, much. :) Once again beautiful photos. So pretty. The second bromeliad's photo reminds me of baby birds waiting to be fed.

    Teresa

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. T. Powell Coltrin: You are so right about the baby bromeliad birds. Thank you.

      Delete
  41. What an interesting place you live in.
    I have a Pineapple Lily which planted itself in a gravel path at the base of a wall and beside the kitchen drain. I have no idea how it got there, but it is extremely happy in partial shade and produces many flower spikes. It obviously hasn't read the planting instructions.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Relatively Retiring: What a wonderful volunteer plant to acquire. I do love it when the plants refuse to behave as they are supposed to - and they are frequently much healthier that way.

      Delete
  42. 30 books! What a treat! The one about the owl might be a good one for my son who is a birder. And your flowers...I sigh whenever I see them; they are all so lovely. I'm glad you had some distractions; those can be godsends.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. mshatch: A greedy and totally unnecessary treat. And Wesley was an education and a delight. It made me weep, and filled me with awe.

      Delete
  43. I think you have me beat in the book buying department. I'm having a bit of a lull right now because my eyes have gone wonkers. So I read my kindle with font set on "big enough to read from across the room". Love your flower shots...especially the pineapple lily which I have never heard of and now must go read about it! Happy Valentine's Day!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Terri @ Coloring Outside the Lines: I hope your wonky eyes settle. Being bookless would be close to torture for me. Valentine's Day has been and gone here but I hope yours is lovely.

      Delete
  44. Always a wonderful journey with your photos! Happy Valentine's Day!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jono: Thank you. I am still envious of both your mink and your marten.

      Delete
  45. That monkey is terrifying! Owls are terrifying also. Perhaps I need to read the book so I can feel better about owls. Right now they only steal my chickens.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Grannie Annie: I expect they do steal your chickens. And I am sorry. I love them just the same.

      Delete
  46. I do hope you are OK....wonderful distractions...here we are going on day 5 of being house bound by snow and frigid weather. I need some distractions in nature soon.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Donna@LivingFromHappiness: Thank you. I have a way to go yet but there is at least a faint light at the end of the tunnel.
      I hope you get your distractions. In nature or elsewhere.

      Delete
  47. Everyone has a depth of to photos, the Barn Owl was worth a million, well done EC.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bob Bushell: How I wish the owl photo was mine. It isn't though - it is the cover of a book.

      Delete
  48. Your adventures are FUN. Thank you for including me.
    How is the "OWL" book? It looks quite interesting.

    xx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My Inner Chick: Wesley was a wonderful book. I was filled with jealousy, I learnt things, I wept.

      Delete
  49. Wow! Someday, I might be brave and knowledgeable enough to do a blog solely of photos with blurbs. I enjoy your forays and your comments. Haven't seen an owl of any kind around here, but there might be some. Thanks, EC.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Patricia A. Laster: Sunday Selections is a fun meme, and no special skills are required. Really they aren't. I know there are owls in my city, but I have not (yet) seen them.

      Delete
  50. I didn't know naked ladies are flowers, lovely ones too. It's difficult for me to accept that the towering red thing is a monkey.

    Be well, EC.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Rawknrobyn: It is a truly ugly monkey isn't it? And Naked Ladies are a most excellent name for this lily.

      Delete
  51. You always seem to find such interesting things to see. I'm glad the outing, the books and the flowers lift your spirit a bit. Hope you feel much better soon.

    ReplyDelete
  52. With your great collection of books I guess you will have read "H is for Hawk" by Helen Macdonald - but if not, I recommend it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Avus: Welcome and thank you. I was given H is for Hawk for Christmas. And loved it.

      Delete
  53. Thanks for the tip about "Wesley." a definite must read for me!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dawn@Lighten Up!: Wesley was a most excellent find. And will not be recycled from here. I suspect it is a book I will read again and again.

      Delete
  54. Hello, wonderful post. I have to check for the book on Wesley the owl. Lovely collection of flowers. Happy Monday, enjoy your new week!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. eileeninmd: Thank you. Tuesday morning here - I hope your week is wonderful.

      Delete
  55. I love the world through your lens. Thank you for sharing. We don't get a lot of free things around here. They have free concerts during the summer at the band stand but its so loud all we have to do is open our windows and we hear it. Not always the best thing. LOL

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sonya Ann: We get quite a lot of free things. Some we see, some we miss, and some I would rather go to the dentist than attend.

      Delete
  56. You are so right, there's always going to be another book to be read! That is the cutest little owl and I had to check the book out on Amazon (see what I mean hard to resist) that monkey isn't very cute, and possibly a bit scary for the little ones up close. But when lights shine the way, it might be a whole new story! Pretty blossoms too, I'm getting anxious for spring.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Karen S.: As you wait for Spring, I am hanging out for Autumn. Pleasant days, nights cool enough to sleep in....
      And there are always going to be several more books to be read.

      Delete
  57. What fun! And Wesley sounds like a wonderful book.
    I'd love to wander through your garden.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sandra Cox: Wesley was excellent. Parts of the garden are good, and parts are in URGENT need of attention. A work in progress. Except when it isn't.

      Delete
  58. It's definitely hard to pass a book sale without buying one - I'm with you, my friend.

    Such beautiful flowers. I hope they perk you up a little - so sorry to hear you are unwell. Hugs!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lynn: Thank you. The only way I can resist the book fair is by not going. I cannot conceive of going and coming hope empty handed.

      Delete
  59. Gosh your garden flowers are super! I'll put Wesley on my book list, and see if it's available in the local library.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Shammickite: The garden is, like my reading, on ongoing task. I weep for both, and bleed and sweat in the garden. I do hope you can track Wesley down.
      There are three of us here who have read it, and all of us loved it.

      Delete
  60. Such lovely shots! And that owl book looks delightful.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. ladyfi: How I would love to be given the privilege of sharing my life with an owl...

      Delete
  61. Did you stay long enough to see if that odd monkey lit up at night?! Great floral shots can't wait for spring!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Tammy Theriault: It was early in the day so we didn't wait around. We will be back (after dark) in a couple of weeks and hope to see the monkey illuminated then.

      Delete
  62. love the flowers so many you can grow out of doors, never saw a naked lady in white only pink.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Linda Starr: The white ones are much less common. This year they are the only ones flowering in my garden. Why? I know not.

      Delete
  63. I have to apologise for being so late visiting your blog recently. I use age as an excuse which works sometimes, and the heat of course!!
    The Chinese exhibition sounds delightful and I like the lines of the building.
    Not seen a pineapple flower before and the others are beautiful as well.






    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mimsie: YOU ARE NOT LATE. AND ARE ALWAYS WELCOME.

      Delete