Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Wednesday, 27 May 2020

Kookaburra

A little while ago David Gascoigne suggested I should feature kookaburras in a post.  Despite them being an iconic Australian bird (and one that is I suspect known the world over) my photographs of them are few (and mostly woeful).

Coincidentally a wonderful kookaburra story popped up in ABC news today.  As we slowly emerge from lockdown I am pleased to see that some people at least have found ways to have (and share) fun.  You can find the story here.  I absolutely loved it and hope you will too.  It also includes a very short video which is well worth watching.

I have also included some of my own photos of 'the merry, merry king of the bush' (and a link to the song about him).







152 comments:

  1. This is a beautiful little creature. Will look at the video now.
    Thanks!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Caterina: I hope the video made you smile as much as it did me. I would really, really love to see that giant kookaburra.

      Delete
  2. Dear EC
    The giant kookaburra made me laugh and we all need to keep laughing at the moment. Your photos are lovely.
    I used to sing the song at 'Brownies' and 'Guides' (groups for girls in the UK - teaching skills, such as tying knots and doing lots of singing.) I also remember the song from a radio schools programme called 'Singing Together' which featured songs from all over the world and which I loved. Happy memories!
    Best wishes
    Ellie

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ellie Foster: Isn't it brilliant? Quite a number of Australian towns and cities have 'big' icons, and I hope that kookaburra becomes a permanent fixture in its new home.

      Delete
  3. Great photos. I've never seen one of these.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jamie Ghione: They are lovely birds, and their laugh carries a long, long way. I thought the giant kooka was inspired.

      Delete
  4. Fantastic photos!! I loved that "BIG" kooka.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Karen: Isn't it brilliant. I cannot imagine not smiling each and every time I saw/heard that. And was super impressed at the construction too.

      Delete
  5. A fun post for sure. I’d love to see and hear one in a gum tree. Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Marie Smith: It was my pleasure, and I am glad you enjoyed it.

      Delete
  6. Wow, what an amazingly big mascot. It's beautiful. The Kookaburra really sound like laughter. Thanks for sharing the links.
    Hugs, Julia

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Julia: Isn't it an incredible creation. I am smiling just thinking about it. An alternative name for the kookaburra is 'the laughing jackass'.

      Delete
  7. I love Kookaburras and a couple of times a year actually hear a couple, right here in the suburbs and once I saw one sitting on a power pole. I saw the giant one on the news last night :)
    I have two fake ones sitting in metal rings, they used to hang in the plum trees in my garden bed, but now they're hanging in the back porch since I brought everything inside.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. River: I am very glad that your kookaburras weren't stolen. I love them too, but don't see (or hear) them nearly as much as I used to.

      Delete
  8. They are such a great bird and the sound they make is very entertaining.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Andrew: Yes and yes. Wasn't the giant kookaburra a wonderful addition to our 'big things'?

      Delete
  9. I was never aware of a kookaburra bird. I sure enjoyed learning about it and seeing it in giant form. Your photos are great. If I ever go to Australia I'll be looking out for the kookaburra.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Myrna R.: Thank you. If ever you do get to Australia I hope that you do see (and hear) the kookaburra - both the real ones and this giant sculpture.

      Delete
  10. Is that what their call sounds like? I loved the video and the story about the creator of that magnificent creature. Thank you so much for enlightening me about this bird. Now I'm going online to hear the sound of one in the wild. :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. DJan: It isn't a bad facsimile of the sound at all, as I hope that Captain Google has confirmed.

      Delete
  11. They're larger than I expected. I wish we had them here. Our country could stand a few laughs....

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bill: The real versions are a fraction of the size of the talented creation by Dr Dalira, but are much loved. And the world needs more laughter.

      Delete
  12. Even the name is brilliant, I love your photos, they are joyful.

    XO
    WWW

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wisewebwoman: We all need joy at the moment (and always) don't we? Hugs.

      Delete
  13. Now that is making good use of your time in lockdown. I should have thought of doing something productive, but my talents(?) lay elsewhere. I spent my time bitching and moaning, and a little crying.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Starting Over, Accepting Changes - Maybe: Wouldn't it be wonderful to have such talents? I cannot claim to ever be so productive. Lockdown or not.

      Delete
  14. That is a beautiful creature and I love the video. I’ve heard this call before but never knew what it was. Thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Rick Watson: Wasn't that an inspired interpretation of one of our national icons?

      Delete
  15. Such pretty birds, and i like the name, too. Now to go follow the links, if i follow first, i often forget to come back and comment!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. messymimi: I hope you enjoyed the links. I have similar problems which is one reason why I ensure that when you open links on my site the original post stays open.

      Delete
  16. Without your kookaburra, there would have been no summer camp all over the world.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Joanne Noragon: The blogosphere told me some years ago that song was widely taught around the world - which blew me away. We we taught it early but I had no idea that the same was true in America, Canada and the UK as well.

      Delete
  17. Replies
    1. Laurie: It was. Just as the moment the news very, very rarely makes me smile. This article and the genius of the giant kookaburra's creator did.

      Delete
  18. Didn't know of kookaburras. I delight in them. When nature leads us into laughter, I'm always delighted. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Geo: It is lovely to see you here again. Nature brings me delight, awe and wonder every day. Laughter is an additional bonus.

      Delete
  19. I love kookaburras. I have my little family of them that visit me every afternoon for their dinner. They keep watch on my movements throughout the day...they are never far away! :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lee: You are very lucky. We don't see or hear them nearly as often as I would like.

      Delete
  20. It looks like a parade float. I'm sure it will wind up in a parade at some point in time.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mike: We don't really do parades, and hope that the kookaburra joins our long list of 'big things' at its new home in Townsville.

      Delete
  21. For some reason, the kookaburra song was one we learned and frequently sang in elementary school, along with Waltzing Matilda. Maybe because Australia and Canada are both Dominions of Britain? Anyway, we did. How lovely to see a picture of a real one, and that giant one is a marvel of engineering and imagination! Thanks for the links, EC.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. jenny_o: I was super impressed at the construction of the giant one. Particularly since the talented maker was doing it in lockdown far away from his usual home. I was also really pleased to note that he came to Australia as a refugee and has been making a very positive contribution ever since. How I wish that our current government realised that this is often true.

      Delete
  22. I used to sing the kookaburra song too, but I never knew what it looked like. Thanks to you, I now do. I'd say it looks like a cross between a bird and a duckling. They are cute.
    Take good care.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Rawknrobyn: I would never have thought of a duckling in connection with a kookaburra's appearance (perhaps because I know that they are not averse to a fledgling bird for dinner). How amazing that you also grew up with that song.
      Hugs.

      Delete
  23. Fascinating bird they are. My that's a huge on that man built - good story.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Margaret D: He did an exceptional job didn't he? And I agree, they are fascinating birds.

      Delete
  24. Replies
    1. Beyda'nin Kitapligi: Thank you. We are very, very fond of them.

      Delete
  25. Today, we all think of that as a "laugh" But I've often wondered what the first Europeans in this country thought of the totally new sounds they were hearing.Just close your eyes and imagine you've just got off a convict ship, the sun is going down, there is no street lighting.Shoot!There's no street! And you hear that.
    It's been a few years since I've heard them nearby, but the other day we had one in a palm next door; he chortled for maybe ten minutes, then flew off to join some others.
    OH! Still on birds...on Sunday I heard, then saw, two Pacific Baza hawks.I had to rush indoors to tell The Man as we have not seen any for more than 10 years.Stoked, we were.

    ReplyDelete
  26. dinahmow: I suspect that more than one of our birds and their calls were frightening. Even the currawong warble (which I love) is haunting and perhaps eerie.
    I had to ask the web about Pacific Baza Hawks. I hadn't heard them, much less seen them. Lucky, lucky you. A positive flow on from lockdown?

    ReplyDelete
  27. Ho rivisto il video alcune volte, è gigantesco, complimenti al costruttore è stato un vero genio.
    Buon mercoledi.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Giancarlo: I am glad you took the time to see the video, and I agree I think his work is spectacular.
      Have a wonderful week.

      Delete
  28. Such an adorable bird and cute video about them.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mason Canyon: They are a much loved bird, and I thought that Dr Daliri's creation was inspired. Inspired and beautiful.

      Delete
  29. I have heard about them, so cute!

    ReplyDelete
  30. Thanks for the link to my blog, Sue, and thanks especially for featuring the Kookaburra, a truly wonderful bird, and as important an Australian icon as a kangaroo or the Sydney Opera House! Australia is indeed a continent of wonders!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. David M. Gascoigne: It was my pleasure. I loved that serendipity came to play and gave me the link to that beautiful giant kookaburra too.

      Delete
  31. Thank you for this piece of unadulterated joy. I knew that song since my schooldays, but never actually saw a cookaburra. Does it really sound like this? Then I undersatnd the laughing donkey ;)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Charlotte (MotherOwl): It's call is indeed pretty close to the video - and the youtube link to the song also features the song of the kookaburra. I am glad that you also felt the joy - and intrigued to hear that the song made it to you as well.

      Delete
  32. Replies
    1. Sandra Cox: They are. Unless you are a snake, a lizard or a small bird. They are partial to nestlings I believe. Beautiful killers.

      Delete
    2. Hmm. I'm going to have retract sweet.

      Delete
    3. Sandra Cox: They are still amazing though.

      Delete
  33. Hi EC - that's just wonderful ... I may borrow the kookie for my #WATWB post this weekend. Wonderful to see ... I think I'd noticed on the Beeb ... but hadn't got to look ...

    Love it - cheers and very cheering ... Hilary

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hilary Melton-Butcher: I would be very chuffed if you did feature Dr Daliri's work on your #WATWB post. I smiled when I first saw it, and continue to smile with each viewing.
      Stay well, stay safe.

      Delete
    2. Thanks EC - didn't do it this time ... but I might well use it anon - just love it ... so thanks for the thumbs up - I sent it over to Lenny in the States and he loved it.

      All the best for the now ... xoxo

      Delete
    3. Hilary Melton-Butcher: Not a problem. I read and thoroughly agreed with your #WATWB post. Lenny came over to say how much he enjoyed the kookaburra so thank you - to you and to him.

      Delete
  34. Now I'll be singing that song all day in my head. LOL Their feathers look so soft. Makes me want to pet them.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Melissa: I am sorry to have given you an earworm. They do look soft, but I suspect that petting them may result in blood. Yours.

      Delete
  35. Now I'm singing! Love it - and that story is amazing!!! what a great way to spread joy!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jemi Fraser: Wasn't it an inspired thing to do? I am particularly impressed that it took a refugee (a group we often treat badly) to share the immense fun and beauty.

      Delete
  36. Wow, I love their little heads. I've not seen them before.

    ReplyDelete
  37. As soon as I saw the title to this post I started singing the song. Love this!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anne in the kitchen: I am so glad. And of course with your vast musical repetoire you already knew about the merry, merry king of the bush...

      Delete
  38. What a wonderful story! And that giant bird is truly awesome. I haven't even heard about kookaburra before. Now, I have to go to wikipedia for more info. Lovely photos, Sue.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Olga Godim: Isn't it a joyful story? Which I firmly believe we all need. I do hope your don't get lost in the wikipedia rabbit holes - and that you enjoy our kookaburra.

      Delete
  39. WOW!!! I had heard of the kookaburra, but had never seen one. And aren't they gorgeous?! Thank you so much for these wonderful photos...now I can actually say I've seen one! 😊😊
    Thank you for the story too. It is amazing!!
    You've got me singing the song now too...😉

    Sending you much love and hugs ❤❤❤❤❤❤❤

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ygraine: I am loving that there is a world-wide chorus of Kookaburra sits in the old gum tree... and we didn't even need zoom.
      Hugs and love to you too. Stay safe.

      Delete
  40. Replies
    1. Hena Tayeb: They are. And Dr Dalini's creation is amazing.

      Delete
  41. I loved the story and the video - and your photos are really great. Such an attractive bird, in real life and in the large, beautifully crafted version.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Alexia: Isn't it a wonderful story? I am particularly impressed that this absolute beauty was crafted by a refugee - and am so grateful that we allowed him to make his home here. We have decidedly benefited.

      Delete
  42. It's a fabulous sculpture isn't it?! I'll let you know when it arrives shall I? I'll even try for a photo. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Rose ~ from Oz: It is indeed fabulous. I would really, really like it if you do let me know when it arrives, and photos would be a bonus.

      Delete
  43. KOOL post! Love the pics, story, video and song. My mom sang that song when we were little. Fun memory.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lenny Lee: I am amazed at just how many people (and not just orstrayan) know the song. Hooray for fun memories (and super clever creations).

      Delete
  44. The pictures are great! Off to watch the video.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Shannon Lawrence: Welcome and thank you. I hope the video makes you smile. It does me.

      Delete
  45. Absolutely stunning the Kookaburra, it's beautiful.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bob Bushell: Thank you. I love both the real ones and this giant songster.

      Delete
  46. Replies
    1. Kinga K.: They are. We don't see them often enough, and are always pleased when we do.

      Delete
  47. That guy's handmade kookaburra is nothing short of amazing. I mean, WOW!! The talent! I love your photos. It looks so soft and fluffy!!

    Elsie

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Elsie Amata: Isn't it incredible? And he made it away from home too, in lockdown in another city!!!!

      Delete
  48. That is just the best name for a bird:)
    Thanks for sharing the view from your window - really.
    It makes my world richer,
    Jennifer

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jennifer: I am sorry that blogger has rechristened you, and am very glad to share the wonder. As you do. So very often.

      Delete
  49. I even have a tattoo of one on my back from my trip to Australia! Along with an gyrfalcon representing my trip to Iceland. Beautiful birds.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. HBF: You have seen a gyrfalcon? Lucky, lucky you. Our kookaburra is in wonderful company on your back.

      Delete
  50. Replies
    1. John Wiswell: They are, but that beak and those talons can be formidable.

      Delete
  51. Their coloring and sophistication are beautiful!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Tammu Theriault: Yet another one of nature's marvels.

      Delete
  52. I love the big Kooka! and I love the flying variety, too.

    ReplyDelete
  53. I read this the other day but for some reason didn't comment. Been a tad busy. I love kookas too, I would like to remember to come back and watch the film etc. Will try and do so later.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jo: You have been very, very busy. I do hope you can get back - but completely understand if you can't.

      Delete
  54. I love the giant kookaburra video! Some people made great use of the time in Iso, haha! I found the juggle of kids doing online learning and working from home a bit too much to manage myself to try any extra things! :)

    These are great pics you have - I do see kookaburras around a lot here in our new place but they never hang around long for pics - they are not as friendly as other birds I don't think!

    Hope you are having a lovely week :)

    Away From Blue

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mica: Welcome. Isn't that video - and his use of the lockdown incredible?
      Juggling online learning and working from home sounds like a perfect reason for you not to take on any more.
      Kookaburras often are flighty. I hope that the ones around your new place will get used to you and let you take their photograph.

      Delete
  55. I love the kookaburra.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jim: Welcome. I did too. The giant kookaburra filled me with awe. I would love to see it close up.

      Delete
  56. I have seen pictures of kookaburras and always thought them as fierce looking. But your shots of them show they are actually quite cute

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. kestrel: They are fierce. And also cute. I think many owls fall into that category too.

      Delete
  57. Fabulous photos as always! Hugs, RO

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. RO: Many thanks. Your comments are always so supportive. Stay well, stay safe - and non infectious hugs to you too.

      Delete
  58. How cute kookaburras bird ..., you have taken good aim in the picture.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Himawan Sant: Thank you. I don't see them nearly often enough.

      Delete
  59. Oh my goodness, I would love to borrow that kooka for a weekend and have it merrily laughing in my garden along with its feathery cousins. It reminds me of the follies that are dotted around the UK, quite different as the kooka isn't architecture but oddly similar in other ways.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Kim: Isn't it a joy? I can't even think about it without smiling... I really love that the real birds seem to enjoy it too.

      Delete
  60. As soon as I saw the title of your post, that song immediately popped into my head. (And lots of other heads, too, I bet.) You guys have such over-the-top cool critters there in Australia, and the kookaburra is definitely one of them. And now, thanks to that video, I've finally heard one laugh! It's very cool that that gentleman built that giant kookaburra. Seeing it and hearing its laughter should lift a lot of spirits.

    Take care, dear lady, and have a wonderful weekend.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Susan: That laugh is spectacular isn't it? Dinahmow mentioned (rightly) that the first white settlers here probably found it unnerving, but I love it.
      I hope that it lifted your spirits too.
      I am sending oceans of caring your way. You, Smarticus and your family are in my heart.

      Delete
  61. What a great video of the kookaburra! Loved it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. gigi-hawaii: Isn't it great? I loved it too.

      Delete
  62. Oh, I loved it and sang along with them because it's a song a learned as a child. I've never seen a kookaburra or heard one until now so thank you so much. I love it!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mildred Ratched: You also learned that song? I have been blown away by how many childhoods included it. And the laugh is wonderful. I am so grateful to that talented man. Smiles are always welcome - and particularly at the moment.

      Delete
  63. Such a lovely post, they are pretty looking birds with a lovely name. Many thanks for the links.

    Can't believe it's the weekend again, I hope you have a good one.

    All the best Jan

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lowcarb team member ~Jan: Where does the time go? Twenty minutes ago it was Monday and now Saturday has arrived.
      The kookaburra got its name from one of our first people and I love the way it rolls off the tongue.

      Delete
  64. I am back after many medical appointments plus a week in my local Hospital. From my bed I was able to observe via the broad window many bird species including the Kookaburra. I was unable to hear their call due to the D/ glazing. the first visitors of the day were the pairs of Ibis rooting about in the grass.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Vest: I am glad you are back, and have read your posts of the day. Seeing but being unable to hear the birds would frustrate me. Big time.

      Delete
  65. Replies
    1. Mary Kirkland: They are. They are also efficient killers.

      Delete
  66. Replies
    1. A Casa Madeira: Isn't it? Have a wonderful weekend.

      Delete
  67. Ti auguro un sereno e felice fine settimana.

    ReplyDelete
  68. Nice snaps! Have a great weekend.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The Liberty Belle: Many thanks. I hope your weekend is lovely.

      Delete
  69. Wouw.. Kookaburras is a beautiful bird..
    If I can.. I want to see it nearly..

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Justcherry: They are very beautiful aren't they?

      Delete
  70. Ahhh! Thank you for showing me what a kooka burra looks like. I've always loved singing the song about him and am glad to make his acquaintance through you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Kalpana: I had no idea that his song was so widely known, and am glad to share the beauty of the bird.

      Delete
  71. We always sang the song on family trips and at church camp. I never thought of the kookaburra as a bird. I thought he was an elf king.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Granny Annie: He is decidedly a bird. I like the idea of kookaburras as elf royalty though - and suspect the kookaburra would too.

      Delete
  72. Gay his life must be! (From childhood aquaintance)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Cloudia: I hope his life is gay. I am amazed to hear of someone else who grew up with this song.

      Delete
  73. Love the photos - as always, I'm amazed (and envious) at your talent for photographing birds! I'd never heard the kookaburra's call before - it made me laugh, too.

    We used to sing "Kookaburra Sits In The Old Gum Tree" as a round when I was a kid. Living on the prairies in Canada, I had no idea what a kookaburra even was, but I've never forgotten that cute and simple song. :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Diane Henders: I am amazed at how far that song has travelled and how many minds it has claimed a permanent niche in.
      I smiled when I came across this amazing creation and would LOVE to see if for myself.

      Delete