Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Wednesday, 17 August 2022

Words for Wednesday 17/8/2022





This meme was started by Delores a long time ago.  Computer issues led her to bow out for a while.  The meme was too much fun to let go, and now Words for Wednesday is provided by a number of people and has become a movable feast. 

Essentially the aim is to encourage us to write.  Each week we are given a choice of prompts: which can be words, phrases, music or an image.   What we do with those prompts is up to us:  a short story, prose, a song, a poem, or treating them with ignore...  We can use some or all of the prompts, and mixing and matching is encouraged.

Some of us put our creation in comments on the post, and others post on their own blog.  I would really like it if as many people as possible joined into this fun meme, which includes cheering on the other participants.  If you are posting on your own blog - let me know so that I, and other participants, can come along and applaud.

Last month's prompts were provided by Hilary Melton-Butcher for which we thank her.  This month they will again be here, and I am providing them. 

This week's prompts are some typically Australian phrases/slang.  Feel free to add more, and use (or not use) these as you see fit.

  1. Pull the wool over his eyes
  2. Put a sock in it
  3. Dog's breakfast
  4. Gone walkabout
  5. Six of one, half a dozen of the other
  6. Tell him he's dreaming
Have fun.

 

 

78 comments:

  1. I tried to Pull the wool over his eyes.
    I Put a sock in it, but still looked like the Dog's breakfast because I'd
    Gone walkabout before dawn.
    Ah, Six of one, half a dozen of the other! I'll just Tell him he's dreaming.
    Have fun!

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  2. "Good morning Mother. "How nice that Billy called you first thing and now you are calling me".

    "I know I told you I did not mind you setting me up for a date, but I never asked you to do it."

    "I am not desperate. I told you I don't have to go out at night to be content. In fact I rememberer specifically telling you as far as I was concerned, going out or staying in was about six of one or half a dozen of the other"

    "Well, I am glad you talked, but not so happy it was me you were talking about."

    "No, you did not try to pull the wool over his eyes, unless you told him I looked like some Russian fashion model. In that case you did!"

    "And no, I did not arrive looking like a dog's breakfast"

    "Yes, I understood perfectly well over our dinner conversation that his choice for a date would be would be someone who showed up with big blonde hair, a tight short dress and some seriously high heels. Quite the opposite of what he got. I told him since we were there and could have a meal and conversation , but he needed to put a sock in it because I was not going to listen to his disappointment all evening."

    "And now all of the sudden I am the most fascinating woman he as ever met? Tell him he is dreaming!"

    "I know your intentions were good, but please, for all that is Holy, do not talk with him about me again. In fact tell him I've gone walkabout"

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    Replies
    1. Anne in the kitchen: Love it - but feel sure that Mother has not given up.

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    2. Some people's mothers! Excellent story.

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    3. Hi Anne - this was fun ... they're great phrases ... and you've put them together well ... cheers Hilary

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    4. Nicely done, Anne, some mothers do have 'em.
      XO
      WWW

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  3. Tell him he’s dreaming. No matter who you vote for, you get a politician. Six of one, half a dozen of the other. They make a dog’s breakfast of the country and then ask us to vote for them, thinking that they have successfully pulled the wool over our eyes. Put a sock in it sunshine. I wouldn’t piss on you if you were on fire and I am not going to vote for you. It is past time that you took a very long walkabout – and don’t bother to write.

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    Replies
    1. I'm just going to copy yours.

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    2. Mike: I am not nearly as succinct as you are - and would love to see what you do with these phrases.

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    3. Ha! Excellent! You go, woman.

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    4. Well that is just about perfect!

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    5. That felt like a breath of fresh air, the real opinion of a real person, and you spoke for me, too.

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    6. Oh dear - and we're in the process of that ... great fun EC ... thanks .. made me laugh and think - descriptive perfect - cheers Hilary

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    7. Dear EC
      That is so appropriate for us in the UK (and I have no doubt, in other countries). Dog's breakfast indeed!
      Best wishes
      Ellie

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    8. Yup Ellie - dog's breakfast all day ... so true - Hilary

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    9. As always, the master scribe comes through. I will give this a shot later.

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    10. Very well said EC, and they are the same worldwide. One independent out here on the Edge who is honest and doesn't give a flying but the rest are just bobble heads.
      XO
      WWW

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    11. I'm laughing out loud! Seems you and I feel the same way about politicians. :-D (And well done with the prompts!)

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    12. I am just amazed with all of the people in the world, how some people make it so high up the politician ladder. :)

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    13. I looked at them for a while and nothing was jumping out at me. I may come back and try later.

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    14. Mike: I hope that inspiration does strike.

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    15. Elephant's Child: This makes perfect sense. No matter who gets voted in, there's always some that just don't do the job right. Good use of the prompts.

      Have a lovely day.

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  4. Replies
    1. messymimi: As usual I am really looking forward to seeing what you do with this week's prompts.

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    2. The prompts themselves gave me the story line, and some characters claimed it. Maybe they'll let me get to know them better.

      The story will be over here.

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  5. Aussie phrases? Oh boy! What to do with them...

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    Replies
    1. River: I am sure you will do well - as you do week after week.

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  6. Gosh that week went fast and oh my, what good ones to make a story out of.

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    Replies
    1. Margaret D: You are right, the week rocketed by - and thank you.

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  7. Hi EC - thanks for these ...

    Dreaming … why should I tell him he's dreaming? He believes it's reality … he's happy – I just go along with his thoughts and enhance those ideas – there's nothing wrong with doing that … no harm to anyone.

    We laugh happily through our dreaming stories … more uproariousness prevails – keeping us happy, giving him (let alone me) exercise as he lies there chortling …

    The carers and nurses come in to see where the unusual noise is coming from … they join in – giving them something different to talk about … happy memories all round …

    This worked for my mother … who on earth would want to stop me doing it for my uncle … 'silly people'!!

    Near enough a true story ... cheers Hilary

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    Replies
    1. Hilary Melton-Butcher: I firmly believe that we all NEED to dream. This touched my heart. Thank you.

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    2. I love the image of him chortling, thanks to you.
      XO
      WWW

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    3. That's such a joyful story!

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    4. Awww. Thanks for sharing this, Hils.

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  8. “Diane, you really have to stop PULLING THE WOOL OVER HIS EYES,” said my mother, exasperation clearly evident in her tone. She was of that generation where daughters should be married by twenty-three and any later indicated a problem, and here was I, thirty-six and still single, happily I might add, without a smidgeon of regret. I am sure that Mom thought I had made a DOG’S BREAKFAST of my life, despite my career success and the fact of having achieved financial independence. “Shall I just TELL HIM HE'S DREAMING?”, I retorted. “Oh no, dear” she said, “Nothing so final as that.” I was really wishing she would PUT A SOCK IN IT, but that wasn’t too likely since she considered him a “fine catch” (her words not mine). “Why not GO WALKABOUT and think it through?” was her next attempt at getting me to commit.” That was her mistake. I left the house, but rather than GO WALKABOUT I met Shelley and discussed it with her over wine and nibblies. That was enough to make up my mind. I returned home and said, “Mom, I have thought it over. Once I was in the frame of mind where it was SIX OF ONE AND HALF A DOZEN OF THE OTHER whether I committed to him. Now I know it’s six of one and ten of the other, with ten on the negative side of the equation. So, let’s drop this whole topic right now. As for those children you always wanted, there are lots of orphaned children in Afghanistan and I think one of those would do just fine. Shelley and I will make great parents.”

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    Replies
    1. Well done David, quite an ending and a big shock for mother!
      XO
      WWW

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    2. Excellent change of tune David - poor Mother ... one hopes over time she'll accept Shelley and any children from wherever they come from into Diane's life. Clever take on the prompts - cheers ... and thanks for the note re mine. Hilary

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    3. David M. Gascoigne. I love it. And hope that she and Shelley live long and happy lives.

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    4. One thing i committed to not doing to my children was push them to commit to anyone, object when and if they do, or harangue about grandchildren. Just as i expected to be respected for how i chose, i want to respect them for how they choose.

      Good story. There are way too many of these parents around, trying to live out a fantasy life through their children.

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    5. David M. Gascoigne: I like Diane being financially independent, I don't think there are many people can be like that. Good use of the prompts.

      Have a lovely day.

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    6. David, I enjoyed this. Very creative. Thanks for sharing.

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  9. Most of these phrases are very familiar, used in Ireland too.
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    She went walkabout on January 6th and now it was March 19th.
    Let’s face it, the marriage was a dog’s breakfast of accusations, petty jealousies and pulling the wool over each others’ eyes with their past histories lied about.
    They were a good match alright, he reflected. Honesty had been far off the radar of their wedded bliss. Ha. It was six of one, half dozen of the other if she returned. Which now seemed unlikely.
    It turned out she’d been married four times already and she hadn’t cracked thirty-five yet.
    Not that he was a saint. Someone should tell him he was dreaming if he had harboured hopes she’d come back.
    For there was something about her. Like a mirror of himself in some ways.
    If he talked to the lads in the pub they’d tell him to put a sock in it alright. What a saddo! they’d say, laughing at him.
    But still…….
    ==========================================


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    Replies
    1. Great job! Well done with these prompts.

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    2. Wisewebwoman: Like finding like? And discovering the problems of similarity. A great take on the prompts.

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    3. Sometimes even the wrong one gets under your skin and you just can't get shed of it. In fact, it's especially a wrong one that can do that.

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    4. My marriage was the dog's breakfast, but this couple has me and my ex-husband beat! ;-)

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    5. Wisewebwoman: You're so good with using the prompts.

      Have a lovely day.

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  10. Hi WWW - well done ... he was taken in wasn't he ... and she's off to find number six ... while he will continue to ponder their life - cheers Hilary

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  11. Dear Sue, no poem today from this fuzzy mind that's caught up with memories of childhood and post-convent. I'm trying to get this second memoir in a readable, connected draft and finding the task quite challenging. Hope all is well. We are having a lovely day--temperature right now is 78 degrees and is supposed to go only to 81! Hip! Hip! Hooray! Dee

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    Replies
    1. Dee Ready: It is lovely to hear from you. I hope that your second memoir is coming together nicely. Hugs.

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  12. I used the words to create a little story for this month's WEP challenge. I didn't think I was going to participate this time, but it came together nicely.
    https://poetryofthenetherworld.blogspot.com/2022/08/the-birth-of-luna-fractured-myth-by.html

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    1. Ornery Owl of Naughty Netherworld Press and Readers Roost (Not Charlotte): I have been, I have read, and I am still smiling.

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  13. I didn't know that most of these were Australian slang, just gone walkabout. They make sense as such though!

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    Replies
    1. Fundy Blue: I think that some at least of them were 'borrowed', but they are all classed as particularly Australian phrases.

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  14. What fun! Another very nice assortment.

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  15. Hoy me he levantado bien temprano para ir a caminar. ME TOMÉ UN DESAYUNO DE PERRO, ya que había poco para desayunar.
    Mi madre que me vió tan compuesta, lista para salir me dijo ¡IDO DE DE PASEO! Y en seguida cerré la puerta de la calle.
    Hacía una temperatura agradable para estar en la calle. Acababa de salir las luces del amanecer y encaminé mis pasos a un parque no muy lejano de donde vivía. Allí no paraba de recorrer los numerosos caminos, mientras escuchaba revolotear los pájaros que habían salido ya de sus nidos.Era la hora de sentarse en uno de sus bancos y deleitarse del suave aire que soplaba sobre mis rostro y el agradable aroma de lavanda y romero. Un señor mayor pasó dando un paseo con un apuesto joven, que me dió los buenos días. Como yo tenía los ojos entornados, el señor le dijo se dirigió hacia el nieto y le dijo al nieto las siguientes palabras. DILE QUE ESTÁ SOÑANDO, ¿Acaso no has dormido bien?
    Como un resorte me levanté del banco no sin antes decirle ¡IDO DE PASEO! y TIRÉ DE LA LANA SOBRE SUS OJOS.

    Cuando regresé a cas ya mi madre me tenía el carrito de la compra listo, para que lo llevara a comprar al supermercado más cercano a mi casa, no sin antes hacerme una advertencia. METE UNA MEDIA, EN EL tambor de la lavadora, que antes dejastes atrás y ponla ya en marcha.
    El carrito de la comprá se llenó hasta arriba en el supermercado, ya que había mucho que comprar. Dejando para la parte de arriba aquellos artículos más tiernos. Se trataba de 6 DE UNO , de las magdalenas envasadas individualmente OTRA MEDIA DOCENA DEL OTRO, estuche que eran de cocolate y venían envasadas de 6 en 6.
    Una vez efectuada la compra ya era hora de regresar a casa y tirar de nuevo del carrito.
    Advertencia. Cuando he escrito el relato, lo hago sin conocimiento del sentido de estas eprexiones , que no se ha usado nunca en el lugar en donde resido.
    Feliz fin de semana.


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    1. VENTANA DE FOTO: Thank you so much for joining us - despite the phrases being alien to you. I enjoyed your story.

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  16. Dogs breakfast....I've not heard that one before and will have to do a google to see what it means, as I have no clue. At least 4 of them are often used here in the states, so maybe not specific to local? Might be fun to know how and where they are all orginated from.

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  17. Had to pop back to show you what I found when googling dogs breakfast....Definition of a dog's breakfast
    British, informal. : something that is messy or poorly done It was a dog's breakfast of a match, and our coach was understandably upset.

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  18. This term is from the early 1800s and means to fool or lie to someone and get away with it through deception and trickery. From the early 1600s to present day, judges in Europe adorn wigs made from wool. In the United States it was a passing phase for our founding fathers to wear them. Pulling the wool over someone’s eyes depicts an unscrupulous person such as a deceitful lawyer when they are successful in lying to a judge and getting away with it. This is likened to physically pulling the wig (wool) down over the judge’s eyes until he/she cannot see properly to make an educated decision based on truth. The slightly earlier form of this phrase was to spread the wool over someone’s eyes. Doesn't say specifically which country, just Europe; but I didn't know there was a connection to wigs. Interesting.

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  19. This is a colloquial British phrase that originated in the early 20th century. It is generally used when someone is being so noisy as to annoy others. The imagery behind the phrases is that putting a sock in whatever was causing the noise would quieten it down. What that thing was isn't known. There are suggestions that this may have been the horn of an early gramophone or, more straightforwardly, the raucous person's mouth.

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  20. Where did 6 of one, half dozen of the other come from?
    The expression comes from the fact that half a dozen is an expression that means six. The idiom six of one, half a dozen of the other came into use in the 1700s. The earliest known use of the expression occurred in a journal kept by a British naval officer, Ralph Clark, in 1790.

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    Replies
    1. Sandy: Thank you so much for your research - I hope you had fun going down those rabbit holes.

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  21. Late as always but here's the link: Fiction: The Introvert Assassin

    These are interesting phrases. I thought "Put a sock in it" was American. Anyway, thanks for the prompts.

    Have a lovely day.

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    Replies
    1. lissa: I have read your tale - and have been thinking about it ever since. Seriously creepy.

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  22. Hope everyone in your household is a having a healthy, happy weekend.
    Big hug,

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    Replies
    1. Sandra Cox: Thank you for these lovely wishes. Sadly we said goodbye to Jazz yesterday.

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