Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Sunday, 15 December 2013

Sunday Selections #150

Sunday Selections was originally brought to us by Kim, of Frogpondsrock, as an ongoing meme where participants could post previously unused photos languishing in their files. 

The meme is now continued by River at Drifting through life.  The rules are so simple as to be almost non-existent.  Post some photos under the title Sunday Selections and link back to River.

Like River, I generally run with a theme.   As you know, I love birds.  This week has been hot, and most of the birds come in briefly at first light, and again at dusk.

This corella was an exception.  (Click to embiggen.)  He came in around ten one morning and spent quite a while sitting on the feeder in the shade.



The cockatoos on the other hand, deserted us.  They went next door and had a wonderful time ripping unripe fruit from his trees, taking two or three bites, dropping the fruit and moving to the next one.




And our Japanese silk tree is in flower.  More flowers than we have had for a number of years.  Such dainty blooms.



135 comments:

  1. Lovely visitors and lovely flowers :)

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    1. DeniseinVA: I suspect the owner of the fruit tree wasn't nearly as happy to see them as I was.

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  2. Ahh, those wiley cockies. We always got a big flock of those sulphur cresteds swooping in as soon as the almonds were ripe. How did they know? They'd strip the tree quite quickly, sample the apricots and move on. Every year!

    Here we get the sparrows and blackbirds stealing our raspberries and strawberries and the magpies stealing the sea buckthorn berries. The magpies are clever. Even though we put a net on the bush, they work as a team, with one watching for us, one lifting the net while a couple more limbo dance under the raised net and then feast on the berries. We let them do it as it's quite funny to watch.

    That flower is really pretty - such soft colours against that glorious blue sky. Not that I'm jealous or anything.....

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    1. Marie: Their fruit/nut barometer is very, very accurate isn't it? We have troubles with birds scoffing the mulberries and then crapped purple everywhere.
      I love the image of the magpies working as a team. I would watch in glee as well.

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    2. Well for them finding food is survival, so I don't begrudge them a share of our bounty. But I do find some of them quite wasteful - I mean is it absolutely necessary to take a peck out of every apple on the tree?

      The magpies are a hoot. These are the European variety, not the Aussie ones. The look a bit like giant willy wagtails and they have a real personality, being well known for teasing cats and dogs. They live in a family group (we have 5 in our garden) and seem to work together very well. I have a very fuzzy picture of one of the victorious culprits: I got one! The picture was taken through the souble glass kitchen window as they disappear if they think they are being watched. We are going to try and film it next year.

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    3. Marie: And the European Magpies are different to the North American varieties. Which shows a sad lack of imagination. I do hope you can film the European ones.
      And no, I don't begrudge them food (though I do resent the cockatoos beheading the tulips).

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    4. PS: I love your cheeky little chappy. As I do ours.

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    5. Yeah, me again! I saw this cute video today with a clever Russian crow: Hitting the slopes! Not only is he using a tool, but he’s using it idly, not out of any kind of necessity – just to do something FUN! I never get sick of watching birds and these days prefer them to most people.

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    6. Marie: Snap on the bird front. I spend a lot of time watching them. In fascination, in amusement, in awe. And this blog fills me with delight.

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    7. Marie: LOVE the crow clip. And you are welcome whenever you drop in.

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    8. My anti-virus protection (Kapersky) won't let me into that blog. It says there is malicious code in it. I hate computers...

      Yes, the crow is hilarious. I wonder where he/she got the idea of sledding down the roof. Very clever, and with just a simple tin lid. I hear people use the term "bird brain" as something derogatory and I shake my head at their ignorance.

      And on a completely different subject, have you read "Flight Behavior" by Barbara Kingsolver? Very good if you get a chance to take a look.

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    9. Marie: I am sorry it won't let you in - there is some stunning bird photography - every day. And yes to Flight Behaviour. I even have an autographed copy. I have, and love, many of her books both fiction and non fiction. Flight Behaviour reminded me of her Prodigal Summer - another cherished book.

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    10. Now I need to find Flight Behavior! I love the book hints you provide. Thanks EC!

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    11. Carol: If you don't know Barbara Kingsolver you are in for a treat. Though I prefer many of her other books to Poisonwood Bible which is perhaps her best known.

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  3. White birds are especially beautiful and I love those flowers.

    Hope you and sp are well n happy :)

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    1. Pam:): They stay surprisingly white (mostly) too.

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  4. Sassy birds! I just can't believe how different your birds are then ours!!! It is so unbelievable that you get to see these all the time! I love that silk tree! So dainty and bright.

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    1. Teresa: We thought we had lost the silk tree to borers a few years ago. Major surgery, and it has come back beautifully.
      The cockatoos are here all year, and some of the others. Bliss.

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  5. I look out my window and I see white too ... but it is not your feathered friends, it is cold, white, fluffy snow. I dream of seeing the summer birds and beautiful flowers again soon. You are lucky ... I don't think you get cold like we do in the winter (correct me if I am wrong). We are much colder (below freezing) much earlier this year so it will be a longer, colder winter for us. Thank you for reminding me that there is light at the end of the tunnel ... Oh Spring, wherefore art thou :)

    Andrea @ From The Sol

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    1. Andrea: You are right, we don't get anything like as cold as you do. Here in summer I am envying your winter - never satisfied are we?

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  6. I am going to great lengths to not crack any more cock or two puns. You tempt me sorely mind as the actor said to the bishop. Damn. I received your parcel today! The box has been cello-taped down and placed under the Christmas tree with great excitement, thank you, thank you, thank you!! xxx

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    1. All Consuming: I suspect Gary will be unable to resist the pun... Glad the parcel arrived safely.

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  7. Great photos as usual. So it's Sunday there?

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    1. LL Cool Joe: Sunday it is. A little after seven in the morning.

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  8. What wasteful birds those cockatoos? Do they shriek in a pitch that breaks ear drums, like the cages ones do? Caging birds is one of the sadest things I see, it's hard to bear. I can't imagine being a bird in a cage. Seems the utmost in human vanity.

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    1. Strayer: They are wasteful. And destructive. And noisy. We often hear them shrieking quite a while before they arrive. And I love them flying free.

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  9. The white cockatoos always seem to be on a mission, don't they? They live in a world of their own. They charge through like Roman centurions! I was running late cutting up meat for my two furry rascals' dinner yesterday afternoon and my feathered friends outside all made sure I was aware of the fact. Boy! Did they chatter amongst themselves at high volume and pace. They were worse than a mob of pensioners at Bingo! The moment I threw the meat scraps out...silence reigned. They'd succeeded in letting me know they weren't too happy about my tardiness and from now on for me not to be late with their dinner before they headed off to their respective nests in whichever tree for the night! I'm not only bossed around by my two cats, but also by the bird life here.

    I suppose I do need to be kept in check!

    Have a great Sunday and coming week, EC. Best wishes to the Small Portion. I hope all is going along smoothly for you both.

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    1. Lee: We too are ruled by the cats and the birds. One of my brothers had cockatoos open a sliding door and march inside when he wasn't quick enough. When he found them they were opening the seed container in the sun room. Clever vandals that they are.
      Which birds do you give the meat scraps to? My father shared his breakfast bacon with magpies for years. Another demanding bird.

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    2. I've got kookas, maggies, butcher birds, currawongs and crows...in that pecking order. Well, the little butcher birds sits on a table just out from the door...he's a very cocky little fellow as butcher birds are. The crows are the last in the pecking order. I do also have the non-meat eaters...and they get bits of fruit. They set up their sentry posts and keep their eyes on me. They know my every movement!

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    3. Lee: I envy you your kookas. I hear them occasionally but it is a long time (too long) since I have seen them.

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  10. Our yard is littered with half-eaten mangoes which possums have been raiding from the many trees around here. So far, I've not managed to get any worthwhile "left overs."

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    1. dinahmow: I have a passion for mangoes and would find that a bit distressing. The one bite and on to the next is a tad irritating. And I still won't figs after cleaning up the mouldy ones left behind by the silvereyes..

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  11. Beautiful shots, the first one is special, thanks.

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    1. Bob Bushell: I do love the corellas. They look almost prehistoric (particularly with their crests raised).

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  12. I always love seeing your birds.

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  13. I love those eyes on the corellas. And yes the cockatoos are destructive. We get the migratory black cockatoos tearing the beach nut trees apart each year.

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    1. Carol in Cairns: The corellas wear their blue eye makeup sooo much better than most humans. We very rarely see black cockatoos and their arrival triggers excitement.

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  14. How wonderful it must be to see cockatoos in the wild, although I wouldn't be too impressed if those were my fruit trees they were stripping. I loved the comments describing how smart they are, and how they came into the house to help themselves to the food. I guess maybe most animals are like that. They get used to us in time, and start looking forward to the food we give them... but we'd darned sure not better make them wait too long for it.

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    1. Susan: They are smart - but not nearly as smart as New Zealand's Kea. Now they are clever. And even more destructive than our cockatoos...

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  15. I always envy you for the wonderful birds you have in your garden. Then I look at "my" little birds and find them most endearing as well.
    Your Japanese silk is stunning - what a fascinating bloom!

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    1. Carola Bartz: I look with longing at birds all over the world. Feathered enchantment.
      The silk tree is coming out more each day. Which makes me very, very happy.

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  16. Oh those cockies are cheeky! The Japanese silk flowers are gorgeous!

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    1. Karen: Cheeky epitomizes cockies. Love them.

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  17. I love love the big white noisy buggers too.
    That silk tree has lovely flowers.
    Merle............,,,,

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    1. Merlesworld: They are very much a love them or hate them sort of bird aren't they?

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  18. Beautiful birds! I'm sure the neighbor isn't thrilled with their eating habits, but they are still lovely to look at. And you're right: that silk tree flower is really beautiful. Does it smell as good as it looks? :-)

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    1. DJan: No, neighbours with fruit trees are not as fond of the cockies as I am. A couple of years ago an irate neighbour ran across our yard bashing on a metal garbage lid. He scared them off. For about five minutes.
      No scent to the silk tree sadly.

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  19. The only cockatoo most of us ever met rode around on Baretta's shoulder.
    The silk flower is gorgeous.

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    1. Joanne Noragon: My mother had one which used to ride around on my father's shoulder. And pluck the hairs from his ears, one at a time. They are surprisingly dextrous with those beaks.

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  20. Talking about birds nibbling fruit, our neighbour has a fig tree, which the wood pigeons simply adore.They eat so much, however, that they get totally pissed and fall off the branches! Tis a sight to behold :)

    Lovely pics :)

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    1. Wendy: It was the silvereyes which ate our figs. And discarded half-eaten fruit to rot on the ground. It was my job to clean it up. Sigh.
      I never saw them pissed though - it would have been a hoot.

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  21. The Japanese silk tree flower is unusual. It does look very delicate, unlike the rough as bags cockies.

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    1. Andrew: Needless to say, the cockies delight in ripping them from the tree and shredding them.

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  22. Oh lovely photos, good for the soul! Your bird shots make me envious. And your Albizia (I've never heard them called Japanese silk trees in this country) - well, that made me sad. We left behind a beautiful big one at our old house, and the philistines who bought the house have cut it down, along with most of our other established trees :(

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    1. Alexia: I had never heard them called Albizia. Live and learn. I hear you on new owners cutting down trees. We sold a home in rural New South Wales which had dozens of trees we had planted. Six months later there were none. No trees at all.

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  23. Oh that Japanese silk tree is lovely. So delicate, so beautiful, living its life whether we're there or not. Beautiful, Sue.

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    1. wordsfallfrommyeyes: So much of nature doesn't care whether we are here or not (and would probably prefer not). Which is a good lesson.

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  24. Do the cockatoos wake you up in the morning?

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    1. Birdie: The wattlebirds beat them to it. They wake me well before sparrow fart. About three thirty at the moment. And, like most of our native birds, they are NOT musical.

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    2. Oh, man. Should I send some ear plugs?

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  25. Love the correllas but those sulphur cresteds can be very cheeky. I am not sure if it was them or galahs that used to disrupt services on the overland telegraph wires between Perth and the eastern states. They used to attack the insulators just as they attack fruit and other things. Over here the black cockatoos attack Kings Park special bottlebrushes and remove not only the flowers but also lots of smaller twigs too.
    Those flowers are so dainty. Do they have a perfume I wonder. They look as though they should. I seem to recognise the leaves but have never seen one in flower before. Thanks for sharing so many lovely things.

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    1. Mimsie: It could be the cockatoos OR the galahs which disrupted services. Both have a destructive side. I would put money on it being the cockatoos though.
      No perfume, though they do look as if they should.

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  26. My goodness, the Japanese silk tree is beautiful! Is it known by any other name? The leaves are similar to Robinia, in colour at least. The cockatoos around here have a great time ripping pine cones off the trees and tossing half nibbled ones all over the footpaths. The rainbow lorikeets get the fruit before the cockatoos show up most of the time. I didn't get a single plum this year.

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    1. River: The truit thieves are really quick aren't they? Quick and wasteful.

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  27. Okay, I've got Albizia from Alexia's comment, thanks.

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    1. River: They are beautiful trees, but are really subject to borer attack.

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  28. Every year, when the cottoniaster's in berry a flock of 400+ corellas descend on our neighbourhood. The noise is unbelievable.

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    1. J Cosmo Newbery: 400 of them would indeed be unbelievable. I suspect the mess is big too.

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  29. The unused photos languishing in my files can never be used and that is why they languish. For instance who wants to see me without my wig seated in a recliner with my dog perched on my shoulder like a cat?

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    1. Granny Annie: I suspect that a lot of people (me included) would LOVE to see you, wigless and wearing a dog like a parrot.

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  30. Stunning creatures.
    Lovely flowers.
    Beautiful YOU! Xx

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    1. My Inner Chick: Thank you so much. Hugs.

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  31. Your Japanese silk tree flower is exactly what I needed to see after two straight days of shoveling drifts of snow. Beautiful. Thank you for sharing.

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    1. John Wiswell: I will confess to a little jealousy on the snow front. It is hot here, and this week is expected to get hotter.
      I am very glad that the silk tree was what you needed though.

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  32. How beautiful the birds, even if they are naughty. That silk flower is precious. You take such great photos and are lucky to have the subject matter all around you.

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    1. Myrna R.: Thank you. I am very, very lucky in the beauty around me. And relish it, each and every day.

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  33. I also promise not to try and make up some cockatoo innuendos. They are fine looking birds, a bit sneaky, but fine nonetheless. I do love those blooms on the Japanese silk tree. And yes, no puns from Gary.

    Gary :)

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    1. klahanie: No puns!!! Are you not feeling well? And yes, the cockies are fine birds. Other people get the black ones too.

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  34. Well! I glance up at the tv...there's Australia just as I discover your blog!

    I love the birds of Oz, especially the sounds they make. All so unusual looking and sounding different too.

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    1. Guyana-Gyal: Welcome. Our birds are not on the whole musical - but very beautiful. And there sounds are a part of me that I would be reluctant to surrender.

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  35. Almost all I see here (in Los Angeles) are pigeons & crows--I'm jealous!!

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    1. fishducky: We get pigeons too. Many, many pigeons. We rarely see the crows here, so I am envious of you. They are such intelligent, family minded birds.

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  36. I didn't know you loved birds - sorry for my griping about them! (My cats love birds too. In an entirely different way ;)

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    1. Riot Kitty: I love birds - and cats. Which puts me firmly in the middle of that sandwich. And you are entitled to your gripes. Being piddled on by anything is no fun.

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  37. The Japanese Silk trees are beautiful. I used to live in an area with a lot of deer. They did the same thing as the cockatoos - take a bite and leave it - so nothing was safe...except rocks. Deer won't eat rocks.

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    1. River Fairchild: Rocks would probably stop the cockatoos too. Houses don't though, they happily chew on the eaves, and anything else which amuses them.

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  38. I share your love of birds. Now, in the winter, the are especially pleased by our feeders and heated birdbath. And the cats LOVE watching them (from indoors) of course. The little noises the cats make as they stare bug-eyed at the birds...wonder what that's called? It's cute, though!

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    1. Ms. CrankyPants: We call that noise of frustrated lust chittering. And hear it often.

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  39. I love the bird but the flowers are just breathtaking. I like how the sun reflects off the thin petals. Thank you for sharing.

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    1. Lady Lilith: There are more coming out each day, and they just about glow in the sun at the moment.

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  40. It always amazes me to see that you have so many (what we call in the States) exotic birds - just flying around.

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    1. Lynn: You get birds that are exotic to me too. Isn't it wonderful that we can share them around.

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    1. Andrew Maclaren-Scott: Thank you - we think so too. As do the cats, though their motives are a tad different.

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  42. What a lovely tree and great shots of the bird too!

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    1. ladyfi: The silk tree is looking very, very good this year. Which is wonderful because a few years ago we thought we had lost it.

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  43. That corella is a beautiful bird – I have never seen it before. Here we only have the usual backyard birds like cardinals, black hat chickadees, doves, sparrows, etc.

    I read your last post about the books you read and all the interesting comments. I would not have been able to read the first book “Beyond all Evil” but will keep the title of the second one. I read as much as I can and every night before going to bed. Usually I have 3 books started plus my Kindle. Right now I am reading “Something to Declare” by Julian Barnes – short stories about France, and “Journalistas” the best writing by women journalists and Jean Cocteau’s “La Difficulte d’ĂȘtre” as I try to keep reading French books so I won’t forget my language. For comfort I look at picture books – of Paris, or Alaska, Hawaii, nature, etc. – anywhere that is beautiful so as to move away sad or depressing thoughts in my mind and bring beauty into it, or if I really need more comfort I read my Buddhist books.

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    1. Vagabonde: Your usual backyard birds sound exotic to me. I suspect your doves and sparrows are different to ours too.
      Beyond All Evil was challenging. Very. And will probably haunt me for quite some time.
      I am glad that you too are a comfort reader - there are a lot of us.

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  44. Awesome :) How come you find so many birds and I can't!!

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    1. WikdBlack: Feeding them helps, but my city is known as the 'bush capital' and has a LOT of wildlife. Which is wonderful.

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  45. Such a gorgeous bloom on the last photograph Soosie. Those parakeet are very handsome too. Summer comes back in my heart every time I visit you xo

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    1. farawayinthesunshine: You would be very welcome to take summer away with you today. It is very, very hot - with more to come.

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  46. Was it unusual for the corella to come alone to your feeder (i.e., do they usually travel in groups)? I've greatly enjoyed the comments on smart/demanding birds today! Although I think I might be a little bit afraid of those cockatoos or any large bird being aggressive! Most of the birds we see in our yards are so tiny compared to yours.

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    1. jenny_o: Most of the birds that come to visit us come in small groups - though occasionally we will get thirty or forty cockatoos, corellas or galahs. And none of them have EVER been agressive.
      It was a pair of corellas that first started visiting us and they came so often we named them tubby and chubby. I suspect this weeks singelton was one of them.

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  47. How beautiful....let me stand here for awhile
    and warm my toes by the light
    of your beautiful warm birds and their bright feathers
    and the blossoms on your trees:)
    oh thank you for this, friend.
    Much love and blessing to you,
    Jennifer

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    1. Jennifer Richardson: Thank you so very much. Your way with words is always beautiful.

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  48. For some reason the corella is always my favorite of your magnificent birds. You are so lucky to have them so close. We have crows.

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    1. Susan Kane: The corella has a lot of charm. Mind you, I have a very big weak spot for crows as well. Such family minded intelligent birds.

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  49. Beautiful pictures, as usual. Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year to you and your family! :-)

    Greetings from London.

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    1. A Cuban in London: Thank you so much - on both counts. And I hope you and yours have a wonderful Christmas, and New Year.

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  50. Wow, EC! I've never seen 100 comments (or more) anywhere! You're truly deserving of people taking the time to stop and comment, too. Congrats! You DO always have gorgeous photos of all the beauty Australia offers! Have a wonderful day/evening! :)

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    1. BECKY: At least half of the comments are mine, so there are less than you think. I am always thrilled when people do comment though - heartwarming. It is early morning here now (Thursday).

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  51. The silk tree appears to be an argument for the use of scientific names, this from Wikipedia: "Albizia julibrissin is known by a wide variety of common names, such as Persian silk tree or pink siris. It is also called Lenkoran acacia or bastard tamarind, though it is not too closely related to either genus. The species is usually called "silk tree" or "mimosa" in the United States, which is misleading - the former name can refer to any species of Albizia which is most common in any one locale. And, although once included in Mimosa, neither is it very close to the Mimoseae. To add to the confusion, several species of Acacia, notably Acacia baileyana and Acacia dealbata, are also known as "mimosa" (especially in floristry), and many Fabaceae trees with highly divided leaves are called thus in horticulture."

    I assume the Japanese Silk Tree and the Persian Silk Tree are probably the same, except that the one in Japan is said to be a nuisance. Whatever the name, they're a delight for children who can climb them before they can climb much of anything else.

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    1. Snowbrush: There is an argument for use of scientific names - except that it needs to be widespread to be effective. If people don't know what you are talking about (and most people won't) it only helps those who are prepared to investigate further.
      Whatever is name, it isn't a good climbing tree here. It is really prone to borer infestation and branches break. Often.

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  52. The corellas have lovely blue eye feathers. The cockatoos did you a favor when they flew next store and drop fruit in your neighbors yard. No messy clean up for you.

    Hope SP is doing okay. Be well, be happy EC :)

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    1. Pam:): They did do me a favour - though they came here to crap. Again. I spend a surprising amount of time scrubbing bird poo from the veranda - and it is worth it.

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  53. Beautiful parrots and flowers! lovely colors .

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    1. Ercotravels: They do have lovely colours don't they?

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  54. Here, we call those Mimosa flowers. If you nip the ends, it leaves a hint of sweet on the tongue :)
    Your latest follower.

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    1. Rick Watson: Welcome and thank you. I didn't know about the sweetness. Perhaps that is one reason the ants love the tree.

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  55. mimosa blossoms remind me of pink powder puffs and of Hawaii when I lived there as a child.

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    1. Linda Starr: Another person who knows them as mimosa blossoms. I do love learning here in the blogosphere.

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  56. Mimosa! Yes, we see tree flowers like this also. I love visiting your world (and seeing you over at mine too :-)


    ALOHA to YOU
    from Honolulu
    Comfort Spiral
    =^..^=

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    1. Cloudia: It is always a pleasure to visit you. And I am very happy that you like my world too.

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  57. beautiful blossoms, i've never seen them before, but i have seen cockies up to all kinds of mischief, the scallywags!

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    1. Kim: To know cockies is to love them though. For most of us anyway.

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  58. I'm just amazed at the variety of lovely birds that visit your garden. so beautiful!

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    1. Debora: We are so very grateful to see them. Every day.

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  59. Love your parrot photos. The black cockatoos are our most common, along with Rainbow Lorrikeets. Right now the magpies and Currawongs are fighting it out with the Channel-bill Cuckoos for supremacy. The cuckoos have the most ear splitting calls, rivalling the deafening cicadas. No peace here day or night but I do love it all, for better or worse.
    Best wishes to you and the Smaller Portion for Christmas and may 2014 be a year of peace, joy and above all, good health.

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    1. Carol: We rarely see black cockatoos here and when we do it is a sign that things are grim in their preferred territory. Magpies and currawongs are daily visitors. And the currawongs are at the top of the equation.
      Thank you so much for your good wishes. He has one more (hopefully) surgery to come. Early in the year we are told. March?

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  60. Beautiful pictures, thanks for sharing them and Merry Christmas!

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    1. Deanie Humphrys-Dunne: Welcome. Thank you so much - and a very Merry Christmas to you and yours too.

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