Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Wednesday, 17 November 2021

Words For Wednesday 17/11/2021

 



This meme was started by Delores a long time ago.  Computer issues led her to bow out for a while.  The meme was too much fun to let go, and now Words for Wednesday is provided by a number of people and has become a movable feast. 

Essentially the aim is to encourage us to write.  Each week we are given a choice of prompts: which can be words, phrases, music or an image.   What we do with those prompts is up to us:  a short story, prose, a song, a poem, or treating them with ignore...  We can use some or all of the prompts, and mixing and matching is encouraged.

Some of us put our creation in comments on the post, and others post on their own blog.  I would really like it if as many people as possible joined into this fun meme, which includes cheering on the other participants.  If you are posting on your own blog - let me know so that I, and other participants, can come along and applaud.

The prompts will be here this month but are provided by Margaret Adamson, and her friend Sue Fulcher.  The prompts  will also include photographs taken by Margaret's friend Bill Dodd.

Sadly this will be the last month Margaret and her friends provide us the prompts.  Margaret's and Sue's health has got in the way and forced them to make decisions about where to devote their energies.  I thank them, and will miss them.

This week's prompts are photos: 



 Have fun.

PS:  I will have to prove I am not a robot to comment on any blogs until some time Saturday.  If your comments are embedded I will NOT be able to comment.

 

139 comments:

  1. The windows are blocked, and the lichen covered fence posts serve to discourage intruders.
    Just the same, nothing can take away my memories.
    It was at a dance behind those blocked windows that we first met, and you stole my heart then, and retain it to this day.

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    Replies
    1. EC- Love this! This sounds like a nice memory for someone to have. Love this spin on the pictures!
      ~Jess

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    2. What a lovely bit of micro-fiction! :-)

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    3. Beautiful! Yes, the building may crumble, the memories can't be taken away.

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    4. Sweet--- Thanks for making them come alive.

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    5. aw memories thank goodness for them

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    6. Love this so much. I see something else inside than what I imagined.

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    7. Almost all we need is never ending love.

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    8. Way better and happier than my dreadful thoughts - so pleased for them ... cheers Hilary

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    9. so much said in so few words! Immediately can see her hopes.

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    10. Sweet story! thank you, and thanks for hosting this fun.

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  2. Elephant Child, you either have a great imagination or a sweet memory. Either way, I like your short story.

    Julia

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  3. How I wish I could see through those closed shutters. How old is this building, I wish I could see the whole building. Is someone still living there? Where is this building with it's closed shutters?

    It looks old but still in good condition. I wonder about the activities of its past inhabitant and all the goings on. The happy times, the hard times and the sad times. They are all part of life wether there are still memories of this past life around or not. Is someone still occupying this building? So many questions unanswered...

    Now l look up to the neglected ornate iron gate or maybe a fence and again imagined that these people must have been privileged to have this around their place.

    One thing I know for sure though is that even when people forget and neglect to upkeep their appearances, Mother Nature never forget to claim what hasn't been looked after. Sooner or later, she will let her magic work on even and old iron gate and she let time take over her initial design. She how beautiful her work is? Oh, the patience of Mother Nature.

    Julia

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    1. Julia: I love this. The patience of Mother Nature indeed...

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    2. It does make you wonder, i agree. Nature will reclaim what we do not keep.

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    3. Julia, this is a lovely story. Mother Nature sure does work on old buildings.

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    4. Mother Nature has endless patience. Well done!

      XO
      WWW

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    5. Hi Julia - so glad to read below that nature isn't taking you over ... this was delightful to read and so true - cheers Hilary

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    6. Excellent. All that is green and creeps along a wall will ultimately win.

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    7. Yes green wil cover anything given time. Lovely reminder.

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  4. Oops, sorry about all the typos. I was too much in a hurry.
    So is my life. No moss is growing on me.
    Julia

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    1. Julia: Not a problem. I am also a woeful proof reader with dyslexic fingers.

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  5. Auntie Marie reached a shaky hand to the iron work. It was once black and strong, now it was lichen covered and rattled. Pushing slightly, Auntie opened it with a creak and rattle.

    What had been a garden with pinks, red, and yellows was a tangle of brambles. The house had been one filled with people and family. Now it was bare brick, windows long boarded up.

    Auntie opened the heavy door, dust floating in the still air. Closing her eyes, Marie whispered, "I'm home. Do you hear me? I am home."

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    1. Susan Kane: This is sad - and beautiful. I hope she is heard - and welcomed.

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    2. Poor Auntie Marie, has her work cut out for her. There's no place like home. She'll need some help.

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    3. Awww, i hope she can reclaim the place if that's what she wants to do.

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    4. Ah! Quietly sad. So sad. I hope she can reclaim it to its past glory

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    5. Chills. Yes, this gave me chills. Good job.

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    6. Lovely sometimes we are haunted by old buildings.

      XO
      WWW

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    7. Hi Susan - sad, but so often true - I suspect ... cheers Hilary

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  6. Mike, you better exercise those fingers on the keyboard before moss starts growing on them. You know what Mother Nature can do.

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  7. Photos as prompts are a great idea and of course you did well with them. Do you know what's going on with the missing comments?

    Love,
    Janie

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    1. Janie Junebug: I 'think' it might be a browser issue. I have (for the moment) changed my browser and most of the problems (but not all of them) have disappeared.

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  8. Replies
    1. messymimi: I look forward to reading it, in the fullness of time.

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    2. Yes Somethings are better left unsaid. it is a pity you do not copy and paste your story onto Sue's site here.

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  9. Interesting pictures. I wonder where they will take me?

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    1. I am sure you will come up with a wonderful story around these 2 photos of Bill

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    2. Can't wait to see your story on friday.

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  10. Given a free hand and an unlimited budget, he wondered what he could turn the old grounds and building into. He had lots of artist friends and instantly thought restoring the building to house art studios was the perfect use for the cities long forgotten building.

    The windows were covered for almost a decade and he noticed the wood had a certain patina. He immediately knew in the right hands the wood would be put to good use. He thought of his woodworking friend Pierre. Pierre made rustic furniture without modern machinery. Pierre was sure to have a heyday with these weather worn boards.

    Inside the architecture was simple yet grand. There were chestnut floors and and huge carved wooden doors. The exposed brick on the interior was just as intricate as the exterior promised. Several grand staircases graced the interior hall and he envisioned a wedding bride descending the stairs on her wedding day. He knew he was letting his imagination get the best of him, yet he could hear the old building whispering to him as he slowly walked around taking in all it offered forth.

    As he entered the kitchen he imagined chefs once again cooking meals for grand parties and art venues yet to come. It was a grand plan for a grand old building indeed. The light from the multitude of kitchen windows beckoned him to venture outside.

    All he could see was a tangle of chaotic brambles like a mixed green salad with too many ingredients. He was dumbfounded at the daunting task of restoring the gardens which once surrounded the fine old building. His assistant caught up with him and said we'll bulldoze the whole property and start over. Just then his mother who he'd invited caught up to them and said, you heretics, you'll do nothing of the sort.

    His mother had a vision of what was once there because she'd been to the grand old building many many times in the past. She knew restoring the gardens to their former glory would make her young again and she was tickled to think of all the work ahead of her. She looked at the forlorn fence and decided the fence should be kept in arrested decay preserving the lichen and moss and rust as a fitting enclosure to the future glory of the gardens once again.

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    1. Hope the gardens will be restored. Very nice story.

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    2. A story of renewal and hope! Good job.

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    3. Linda Starr: His mother is right. Destroying that grand only building and its garden would be so very wrong. A lovely take on the prompts.

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    4. Always listen to your mother. Beautifully done!

      XO
      WWW

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    5. The best of all possible endings for such a fine place.

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    6. Hi Linda - that was a wonderful tale of renewal - so pleased to read it ... cheers Hilary

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    7. Yes! Go for it, I'd like to rent a room there.

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  11. I was with you every step of the way, both inside adn outside this building. I could see myself walking down the restored staircase in a beautiful gown to take to the dance floor. I loved how you described the brambles - a tangle of chaotic brambles like a mixed green salad with too many ingredients. Well done and a great story.

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  12. Margaret, Sue, EC, and to all who post-- thanks for making my pictures come alive.

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    1. Bill: Thank you for these stunning images.

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    2. Thank you for these speaking photos of yours.
      Those two set my story on its track.

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  13. Hi EC - this is not a happy 'take':

    The gang inside pushed her, she was tripping over the rough planks in the warehouse ... she could see lines of light - but whew - they pushed her so hard, she fell against one of the boarded windows ... but it must too have been rotten - she was shoved out ... and met her demise on the lichen coloured railings below.

    Sorry! All the best - Hilary

    PS I'll blame Bill - as they were his prompt!

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    1. Hilary No you cannot blame Bill. He did not know what photographs I had chosen for bloggers to write stories about. he is as amazed at you!! Yes a very sad story and I can imagine it

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    2. LOL! Great use of the prompts!

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    3. Euuu! Hilary that is grim. You really did a great job with these images.

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    4. Hilary Melton-Butcher: Awful - but yes, I had to consciously step away from similar thoughts. Great use of Bill's photos.

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    5. Apologies Bill - now I can blame Margaret!! All round not an easy tale - poor woman: though it can happen ... all the best - Hilary

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    6. Lady Hilary, there is neither Bill to blame nor Margaret. It's but all your fantasy.
      I like it.

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    7. Such a sad ending, a well told story, though.

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    8. Thanks to you all - cheers, if one can have them after that sort of tale! - Hilary

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    9. Oh no.
      Excellent job on this, Hils.

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  14. I wish Margaret and Sue only the very best with their health. Sorry to hear they are under the weather. Two great images and I enjoyed reading all your stories thanks to the prompts.

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  15. SHENANIGANS by Granny Annie

    The two boys circled the property. They examined the boarded windows. Yes, they had seen the signs that warned "No Trespassing" but for 10 year olds, that did not mean a thing.

    "What do you think is in there?" Josh ask his buddy Hanson.

    "Probably some old skeletons" Hanson replied with a smile.

    "No way!" Josh responded. "I am guessing some bags of stolen money are hidden in there."

    Determined to enter this old building, the boys used their BB guns to loosen the boards. Slowly the windows creaked open and the two boys climbed inside the dusty, cobwebbed room.

    It was very dark inside. The moved slowly, warning each other in whispers to stay very quiet. Suddenly a screech erupted from a sleeping Owl and it flew in the direction of the boys. Josh and Hanson ran back to the open windows and jumped down. Hanson hit the ground at a run while Josh was caught on the spikes of an old fence. He dangled there until Hanson realized his partner in crime wasn't with him. Carefully he returned and helped lift Josh off the fence.

    His new jeans were ripped and Josh had to think of a good story to explain the destruction to his mother.

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    1. Granny Annie: I am so glad that it was Josh's new jeans rather than his flesh that was ripped - and can just see this.

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    2. Well there is another story waiting to be written at the end of your lovely story. Boys will be boys!!!

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    3. Grannie Annie, I love your story.
      Julia

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    4. Great story, I broke into many buildings as a child. I can totally relate!

      XO
      WWW

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    5. What are ripped jeans against ripped ribs?

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    6. Boys sowing wild oats, he's lucky it was just his pants ripped. Maybe they'll realize it's not worth going back.

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    7. Those boys be lucky - no spike through bodies! Well done Granny Annie ...

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    8. Well written, the boys were lucky - I dare bet they'll return!

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  16. I'm always sorry to hear when people have to stop what they enjoy to tend to health issues. I've been there and wish Margaret and Sue the best. I loved their prompts today.

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    1. cleemckenzie: Health issues can be a blight, can't they, but sometimes decisions have to be made.

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  17. Locked up behind the Red planet's window Deanna, wrongly accused just stared,
    Clearly there is no justice on this world because its unfair.
    Walking forward our shacked prisoner could see grainy encrusted bars,
    Now handcuffed in a dark room only her telepathic mind was free to roam planet Mars.
    Soon I'll beam out from beyond these walls of captivity and escape within the stars.

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  18. Sixty years ago, one timid young girl started her nursing career in an old house called the BEECHES. There were 30 of us, all with our packed trunks which over the next 3 years we would pack and unpack as we were moved round different accommodation.

    A lot had happened in the past 60 years, I am now retired however recently a small group of friends that have continued to keep in contact decided to go and see the BEECHES. We knew it had been closed for many years now but it have so many memories for all of us, we just wanted a last look at it.

    To say we were shocked would have been an understatement when we saw all the growth on the railings surrounding the property. We had a hard time pushing the gate open to get into the grounds as the brambles were displaying their thorns to us. The boarded up window on the right was my bedroom and the left one was my best friend Kathy’s bedroom. To the right of my window, just out of sight in this photograph was a drainpipe. In those days, Miss Frezzel, the housekeeper ( we called her Frizzy, Lizzy) of course not to her face but she keep on eagle eye on us all always and said we all had to be in the house no later than 11 am any night. That drainpipe came in quite handy, because before going out to many a dance, we left the window open a little, then when we came home, climbed up the drainpipe, opened the window and got in without Miss Frezzel knowing we were not tucked up in our beds!!

    We walked round the whole property and felt very sad to see how it had deteriorated over the years, however we all reminisced about the happy days we all had spent there. Oh I could tell you many a tale that would make your hair curl like the day we were in class and we looked out of the window to see William the gardener looking at the wall where there “had” been juicy pears. We had picked every last one the day before but his face was a picture and he scratched his head in amazement at their disappearance.

    We were all glad we had made the trip to see out old Beeches home however we vowed we would not come back. We were happy to keep our memories of a house where we had all met for the first time and supported each other during the 3 hard years of training.

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    1. A lot of changes can happen in 60 years. I'm glad that you all had a great time reminiscing.
      Julia

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    2. Excellent description of a trip down memory lane. Yes, one visit is usually enough if the place has changed enough.

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    3. Margaret Adamson: This is lovely - I am so glad that you felt up to joining us again this week.

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    4. Well written story. It rins so true. Visits to happy (or unhappy) places of old can be hard.

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  19. The shutters were in place. Everything locked down. The wind howled outside. She envisioned the palm trees bending under the force of the gale. The hurricane only moments away. Maybe she should have left as the major urged, but not even a hurricane was worth fighting the traffic heading out of town. That was the whole reason she'd left New York. She reached for her soda and settled in to ride it out.

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    1. I hope she won't regret staying. I do not like driving in heavy traffic either so I can't blame her.
      Julia

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    2. The day will hopefully not come when no shutter will be strong enough to protect us.

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    3. Been there, done that, it ain't for sissies.

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    4. Sandra Cox: Great description - and I do hope she doesn't regret her decision.

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    5. Hi Sandra - I can see authoress in you here ... well done - Hilary

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    6. Ohh, I hope all turns out well in the end. Well written!

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  20. Here's mine. Lovely prompts.
    -----------------------------------------------------------
    Grandpa talked about the old factory a lot. Us kids rolled our eyes at each other, it was hard to tune him out, as he turned off the car radio once he got going in his reminiscences.

    One Sunday afternoon, he was droning on as usual as we three kids sat huddled in the back of his old sedan, listening to stories of tire manufacturing and protective gear, and plant machinery that ran from here to kingdom come and an in-house bowling league when he announced with great fanfare “I have a really big surprise for you today, fasten your seat belts, Grandpa’s flying you somewhere very special!” This was a huge joke as Grandpa barely hit the speed limit and often fell far short of it entirely.

    He drove about fifteen miles to this old broken down red brick building. Every door and window was boarded up and the roof was falling in.

    “Here it is!” he said proudly, “Atlantic Tire Company! I spent nearly 50 years of my life inside those walls!”

    There was nothing to see. A heavy iron fence had been placed around the building. We couldn’t even get near it, or break into it to have a look and play around.

    It is only now, being a grandfather myself, that I come close to tears thinking of those fifty years of basic slavery that my grandfather endured that I regret not paying more attention to his stories and how he created little patches of happiness and contentment.

    I could use his advice today.
    ___________________________________________________________

    XO
    WWW

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    1. It's not necessarily good to have grandfathers, kids might sometimes think, until ... they are grandparents themselves.

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    2. Well done! Grandfathers are so needed, we don't realize until we don't have them any longer.

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    3. Wisewebwoman: Ouch. I suspect that many of us regret not paying proper attention at the time. Badly regret it. This is sooo well told.

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    4. Hi WWW - yes ... how I wished I'd spent more time locked in tales with my grandparents ... we miss so much. Cheers Hilary

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    5. I suspect we wish now we had paid more attention to all our grandparents

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    6. I loved hearing my grandmothers tell tales, but I was too young to understand them, and now I hardly remember more than their presence and voices.

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  21. I really liked this one and stepped right into the story.

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  22. I love the images. Takes me right into the downtown historic section of Boston... years of weather on the wrought iron fence, old factories boarded and abandoned, but not forgotten enough to fall to rubble. LOVE.

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  23. Lets take those shutters for our, for mankind's eyes. Blind as we are we are trying our best to commit hara-kiri.

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    1. Sean Jeating: On dark days I fear we will succeed.

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  24. I adore those photo prompts. Very evocative

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    1. Cloudia: They are great aren't they?

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    2. Cloudia Glad you liked my choice of Bill's photos. it actually takes trolling through hundred to come up with 2 that I think will make a good story and get people's imagination juices flowing.

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  25. Este edificio, me traen grandes recuerdos de mi juventud. Allí se vivía feliz y las risas salían a través de las ventanas, que entonces estaban abiertas, para que entrara le aire ne los días cálidos del verano.

    Ahora el edificio, permanece vacío y las ventanas cerrradas a cal y canto. todo permanece en silencio, sin que haya una alma que habite en él.

    Con tristeza, me acerqué a la verja de hierro, que rodeaba aquel edificio...ya nada en él era igual que antes.

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    1. VENTANA DE FOTO: (Translation follows)
      This building brings back great memories of my youth. People lived happily there and laughter came out through the windows, which were then open, to let the air in on hot summer days.

      Now the building remains empty and the windows closed tight. everything remains silent, without a soul inhabiting it.

      Sadly, I approached the iron fence that surrounded that building ... nothing in it was the same as before.
      I love this story, and yes, the waters move on, and everything changes.

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    2. Time marches on. The building that my father's maternal grandparents owned is now a parking lot. My great grandparents, all of their children, and my father are now gone and have been for quite some time.

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  26. Truly love these photos. Especially the wood shutters. I'll be back tomorrow (Sunday) to see what delicious things you offer. xo

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    1. J C: They are really evocative photos aren't they? Thank you. I am just starting to think about tomorrow's post.

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  27. I love history, movies about the history and historical buildings very much. That old building looks different, would love to see its Windows. Have a wonderful weekend Dear E,C,!

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    1. bread&salt: I am a fan of history too - particularly when it steps away from the lives of the famous and powerful and focusses on 'normal people'. You have a great weekend too. I am sure it will be delicious.

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  28. Replies
    1. Kinga K.: Bill took some wonderful photos didn't he?

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  29. Love old buildings. YOu really captured a nice shot. Sorry to hear about your friends that provide the word prompts. I hope they take care of themselves. Was wonderful to hear from you. I'm looking forward to getting back into blogging more frequently.

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    1. Sandy: Those shots are not mine, but I agree, they ARE wonderful. It was wonderful to see a post from you again, and I look forward to more.

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  30. Sorry for running so late. Here is my creation using the images.
    https://poetryofthenetherworld.blogspot.com/2021/11/november-pad-challenge-2021-sunset-of.html

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    1. Ornery Owl of Naughty Netherworld Press and Readers Roost (Not Charlotte): I am heading over now - and sorry that I am late responding.

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