Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Wednesday, 3 November 2021

Words for Wednesday 3/11/2021

 



This meme was started by Delores a long time ago.  Computer issues led her to bow out for a while.  The meme was too much fun to let go, and now Words for Wednesday is provided by a number of people and has become a movable feast. 

Essentially the aim is to encourage us to write.  Each week we are given a choice of prompts: which can be words, phrases, music or an image.   What we do with those prompts is up to us:  a short story, prose, a song, a poem, or treating them with ignore...  We can use some or all of the prompts, and mixing and matching is encouraged.

Some of us put our creation in comments on the post, and others post on their own blog.  I would really like it if as many people as possible joined into this fun meme, which includes cheering on the other participants.  If you are posting on your own blog - let me know so that I, and other participants, can come along and applaud.

The prompts will be here this month but are provided by Margaret Adamson, and her friend Sue Fulcher.  The prompts  will also include photographs taken by Margaret's friend Bill Dodd.

Sadly this will be the last month Margaret and her friends provide us the prompts.  Margaret's and Sue's health has got in the way and forced them to make decisions about where to devote their energies.  I thank them, and will miss them.

Today's prompts are:

  1. Beechmast
  2. Investigating
  3. Muffler
  4. Sensible
  5. Penetrate
  6. Fox

And/or


  1. Ferrule
  2. Miserable
  3. Odd
  4. Soaking
  5. Bedstead
  6. Contrary

 
Have fun.

And, speaking of people providing the prompts, they will be here again next month but I am again asking/pleading for assistance.  If you are willing and able to provide the prompts next year please let me know in the comments which month(s) suit you or send me an email.

 


122 comments:

  1. Beechmast sent me investigating. Captain Google informs me that they are the angular brown nuts of the beech tree, pairs of which are enclosed in a prickly case. Learning new things is always good but, but, even if it causes Margaret to rap her ferrule impatiently, I cannot at the moment see a way to include this new term in a more or less sensible story.
    Mind you, I am sure that my youngest brother would have found a use for beechmast – probably to my deficit. He is a contrary soul with a decidedly odd sense of humour. Many, many years ago the miserable so and so carefully slid a saucer of water into the bottom of my bed. He was careful not to juggle the bedstead, and to all intents and purposes there was nothing to see. As I got into bed some hours later I kicked the saucer over, soaking the bedding completely. Not only did it penetrate the sheets, the blankets were also definitely damp.
    He heard my exclamations and called up the hall – ‘Mum she has wet the bed’. As I set about remaking the bed with fresh sheets he laughed until his sides ached and tears were running down his face. He had muffled his glee well in the hours between him setting the trap and me springing it. And, speaking of muffled, if I had had a muffler to hand I am pretty sure I would have tried to wrap it round the cunning fox’s throat. In hind sight I can laugh. I didn’t at the time.
    If you were wondering. This is a true story.

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    1. That's hilarious. I love that you worked a true story into the prompts.
      I'm sorry to hear about Margaret's and Sue's health issues.
      How are you and Jazz today?
      Hugs

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    2. E C, I enjoyed how you used the prompts in telling a true story but feel bad that your brother did this to you.

      Your brother was a little rascal. Somehow, I'm sure you must have gotten your revenge on a good practical joke on him at a later date. Maybe, it's another true story for another time.


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    3. I remember the first time you told about your brother, but making it into a prompted story has worked very well. And thank you for beechmast, I had no idea what that was.

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    4. Oh, dear. He sounds like quite the trickster.

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    5. A wonderful well written true story Sue. Brothers can be troublesome at times but eventually they grow up and hopefully learn not to play tricks on you.

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    6. Dear EC
      Another cracker of a story, and true to boot! This mkaes me glad I just have sisters (but they can also do rotten things to their younger siblings, as I can attest!
      Best wishes
      Ellie

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    7. This was a well told tale and a true one I gathered. A fun read.

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    8. That was tricky wrapping a true story in there. I have four brothers and I could tell you some horror stories too, not for them but for me.

      XO
      WWW

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    9. Well done with the word-prompts, and well-told. I hope you devised a suitably evil practical joke to play on your brother in return!

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    10. Diane Henders: I wish. He is much more evil than I can manage.

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    11. Oh wretched kid brother!!! Fun to read - cheers Hilary

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  2. Dear EC, I admit to chortling at your true story. It reminded me of my own brother--three years younger than I--who so loved to tease me because I am, as he's noted throughout the years--so "gullible!!!!"

    I regret not using your word lists each week to tell stories, but Meniere's-- especially in the spring and fall--gets in the way with its foggy thinking and head aching and the inability to sit at the computer and type horizontal lines. But when I do get to return to your blog, I am always delighted with you photographs and your embrace of life. Peace.

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    1. Dee: There is absolutely NO obligation for you (or anyone else) to participate. Your health is much more important. Much, much more important. And thank you for your visits here.

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    2. I echo Sue's comment above. I hope you at least will be able to read and enjoy the stories.

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  3. She was a fox slyly investigating my beechmast as I sat on the beach looking for a sensible excuse to penetrate that muffler.

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  4. A ferrule capped each post of the beautiful bedstead that was contrary to the odd miserable mattress soaking up everything that came it's way.

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    1. Very succinct, Mike, both of these.

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    2. Mike: Margaret et al's prompts took you TWO sentences. A first I believe - and I smiled at both.

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    3. Great job with the prompts in 2 sentences Mike.

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    4. NOOOOOOOOO! That second one was from my other brother Mike.

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    5. How many Mikes are there?! Twins, triplets, quadruplets ... however many - they are always succinct in their take on the prompt/s. Cheers H

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  5. Hi EC - 2nd lot ... but I'll happily provide the words for you - January and another month later in 2022.

    My 'story':
    The miserable old witch made me bend over the bedstead – and always, always she brought out the ferrule – that ruler with a widened end, formerly used for beating children – yet the old hag remembered to bring it back into use.

    Unfortunately I couldn't help soaking the bed … I am an odd creature with a weak bladder – I cannot help that contrary bodily affliction.

    In due time the ancient bag would turn out to be empathetic and help me with my problems …

    It's a good think Halloween only comes once a year … in two days I can burn the stinking bedclothes in one of Guy Fawkes' bonfires.

    Cheers Hilary

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    1. Hilary Melton-Butcher, I hope this was all a bad dream. I'm glad Halloween only comes once a year too. lol. Poor you.

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    2. Nice little nightmare. Enjoyed it.

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    3. A scary story, i hope it's not true.

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    4. Hilary Melton-Butcher: This is nasty, and good. I am so glad that the ancient bag finally displayed some empathy.

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    5. She was a nasty piece of work so I hope this story is NOT true. Great that you can help Sue out with another month of words. Many thanks

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    6. I am famailiar with what we call The Old Hag in Irish/Newfoundland folklore. This story was a good take. Scary.

      XO
      WWW

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    7. Nope - not true at all - thankfully!

      Here The Old Hag is just a phrase in 'regular' use by some and at times!

      Cheers and thanks everyone for commenting - Hilary

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  6. Soaking in her bubble bath she felt miserable for being so contrary to her mother during their weekly dinner. Stepping out of the tub she was always amazed the antique bedroom suite had lasted so long. Her grandfather had fashioned a ferrule to keep the bedstead together for another generation. As she slipped into bed she had an odd feeling her grandfather was there in the room and she was appreciative of his handiwork.

    Hearing a noise outside her window, she sat up in bed to investigate. She could see a fox harvesting beechmast which had fallen under the tree. She laid back down and decided it would be sensible tomorrow to replace the rusted muffler on her car because the mechanic had advised cold air could penetrate the engine block below causing even more problems to her old jalopy. As she drifted off to sleep she vowed to be a better daughter the next time she and her mother had dinner.

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    1. Relating to our relations is often much harder than to others. Good use of the prompts!

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    2. Linda Starr: My own memories of my relationship with my mother tugs on my heart strings. This is a great use of the prompts.

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    3. Great use of the prompts and good that you were going to try to be a better daughter to your mother next dinner time.

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    4. I love this story, how our minds race in bed at times, so much to cover and ponder.

      XO
      WWW

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    5. Congratulations Linda - a clever take. Cheers Hilary

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  7. I had to look up both beechmast and ferrule! I hope you can find someone to help you with the prompts, I know I would not be the right person after being stumped by two of the words on this list, haha!

    Hope that your week is going well :)

    Away From The Blue

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    1. Mica: You are not alone. I think that most of us (and certainly me) have to look up some of the prompt words. I hope your week is going well.

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    2. Over quite a few years now When Sue and I submit prompts we always try to find some words to challenge the bloggers who are very talented in writing these stories. it is always good to extend out vocabulary and learning new things can be fun.

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    3. I so agree - Margaret ... I enjoy the word challenges and remembering certain words. Cheers - Hilary

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  8. I can take a month if you were saitsfied with what I did last time around. Story to follow hopefully tomorrow (still Tuesday here ;) )

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    1. Charlotte (MotherOwl): Thank you so much. I look forward to reading your story tomorrow.

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    2. Thank you for offering to provide prompts for a moth for Sue. Now Sue adn I will not feel so bad at no longer being able to provide them Thanks.

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    3. Story is here - WfW - it's not much, and not doing justice to the wonderful prompts. Thank you, Margaret Birding for Pleasure!

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    4. Charlotte (MotherOwl): You are too hard on yourself. Again. I really enjoyed this snippet from your continuing tale.

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  9. That's sad they won't be able to continue.

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    1. Alex J. Cavanaugh: It is sad, but health is an important priority.

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    2. Thank you Alex but sometimes life takes a curve ball and we have to make decisions because of health issues.

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  10. This story is partly true and partly fiction.

    As a former hobby ceramic teacher, I taught the sensible and proper care of brushes. Simple rules like not dipping the brush all the way to the ferrule in acrylic paint and not leaving brushes soaking in the water as the water would penetrate the wood and ruin the brushes.

    One of the know-it-all student, who was contrary and at odd with this rule, soon turned miserable because her expensive brushes were ruined. The paint all crackled on the handles of her brushes and flakes of paint would fall into her work.

    This same student, left her muffler on while painting and got the fringes into the paint without noticing and so ruined her muffler, while watching a fox investigating squirrels while they were trying to harvest the beechmast in our backyard. In the chase, the fox accidentally ran into an old bedstead that was waiting to be brought to the dump and took a flip and the squirrels scurried up the beechnut tree.

    Julia

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    1. Yes to the truth.
      Even more I enjoyed the fiction.

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    2. Those not willing to learn pay the price.

      Excellent story!

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    3. Julia: I love the way that you married truth and fiction - and would happily watch the scene with the fox myself.

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    4. You should always listen and learn from wise council and unfortunately your student had to learn the hard way. Good story

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    5. Well done, I love this story.

      XO
      WWW

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    6. Excellent Julia - well done ... loved the read - cheers Hilary

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  11. I can take a month, Sue. After mid summer (here) - mid winter for you , preferably. I will try my hand with these prompts tomorrow.

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    1. David M. Gascoigne: Thank you. I will pencil you in for June or July - and look forward to reading your story.

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    2. David Thank you for agreeing to take a month of prompts for Sue. We could have given more word prompts however were unable now to write stories so thought that would be unfair.

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    3. I prefer after mid summer (winter), Sue, not during. September onwards would be ideal.

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    4. David M. Gascoigne. Done deal - and thank you.

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  12. Yes, yes, yes, i will take a month or even two next year. It's such fun! Thank you so much for coordinating.

    Now i'll go work on a story.

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    1. Peeh! I am told "Sorry, the page you were looking for in this blog does not exist."
      Something to look forward for tomorrow, then.
      The peace of the night.

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    2. messymimi: And huge thanks to you too. I am looking forward to reading your story when it goes live. Of course.

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    3. Messymimi Many thanks for offering to do more word prompts for Sue next year. looking at all the peope who have already offered, her next year calendar should be filling up nicely. I am very humbled and pleased by all of the bloggers

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  13. On his way back after investigating the beech mast, the exhaust muffler had crumbled away. Despite soaking wet and despite in the contrary wind more and more feeling the moderate but penetrating coldness, the old woodsman smiled when his miserable lamp let him find the keyhole.
    "A kingdom for a bedstead!" Tomorrow he would ferrule the young fox kestrel, who against the odds had recovered. And Clive would repair his dear old donkey, hopefully for a sensitive price.

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    1. Good use of the prompts, i also hope the price is sensitive to what the old woodman is able to pay.

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    2. Sean Jeating: Echoing messymimi. On both counts.

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    3. Great use of prompts. I never thought of a exhaust muffler when coming up with these words. Always good to look out of the box.

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    4. Sean Jeating, I can picture it all in my mind. I love the story.

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    5. Well done, I really enjoyed this. I can considered a car muffler too....

      XO
      WWW

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    6. Very picture-making story. I enjoyde it , and had to look up your muffler because I did not know a muffler was a car part too - well I know the part of course, only not the name for it in English ;) Thank you for new learning.

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    7. Hi Sean - taking us out in the woods - a different tale for an early winter possibly ghostly snippet. Cheers Hilary

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    8. Thank you, ladies. I do enjoy such finger exercises that hopefully will help to improve my English.

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  14. I can do a couple of months, just let me know which ones are still available.

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    1. River: Thank you. The year is already filling up, which is lovely.

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    2. Thank you River for offering to provide another month of prompts for Sue. People are wonderful when the chips are done for others less fortunate.

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  15. That certainly made me laugh EC especially as it was a true tale...take care.

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    1. Margaret D: Thank you. I can laugh now - but I didn't then. Particularly as we had dinner guests who heard the shout about my wetting the bed.

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  16. I used all the prompts, this was fun. I love this old man.
    ___________________________________________________________
    It was the season. And the day. He knew the beech trees on his road intimately, so intimately he imagined they were pets and he would take them for walks around the neighbourhood if he could.

    He gently gathered the beechmasts, their babies, in his large cotton bag used only for this purpose, its handle held together with an old ferrule, investigating each nut closely for blemishes. He was wary of the foxes getting there before him destroying the harvest by penetrating the outer flesh.

    Passersby didn’t muffle their sensible comments, how labour intensive this process was, what a contrary old man, he should hang his old boots on his bedstead where they belonged, and on.

    So it was odd, he mused as he soaked the nuts overnight to soften them. Some might feel it a miserable endeavour.
    But these trees were his friends, and the yield from his annual twenty four jars of this magnificent nut butter - sold exclusively at a local artisans – paid for his tiny luxuries.

    He would go out later, at night, privately, and hug each tree individually.
    _____________________________________________________________

    XO
    WWW

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    1. Wisewebwoman: I love this old man too. Pfft to the passersby. I hope he enjoys his little luxuries to the full. Hooray for tree huggers.

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    2. Well done. It would be nice to taste such a nut butter, if it exists.

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    3. Certain old folks are lovable, eh?
      A fine read.

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    4. What a dear story. I could see everything clearly. Nut butter, hmm worth a try as the beech nuts are falling now in my place.

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    5. Wonderful WWW - a delightful take on the prompts - delicious too. Cheers Hilary

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  17. PS EC, I'm available for 2022. Slot me in anywhere......

    XO
    WWW

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    1. Wisewebwoman: Thank you so much. The year is filling up wonderfully.

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  18. It was a shared opinion among most that Aloysius, while a knowledgeable fellow, was a pompous ass.
    On our last outing to Paradise Lake we had noticed that the entrance gate was askew and we vowed to fix it next time we visited. Aloysius announced that he had carefully constructed a FERRULE to connect the broken part to the post, glancing around in his CONTRARY fashion to see if anyone had any idea what a ferrule was. Having been through this before, Zelda yelled from behind her MUFFLER which she had pulled up to cover her nose, “Let’s go and check the BEECHMAST.” We all chimed in that it seemed like a SENSIBLE thing to do, well worth INVESTIGATING since a squirrel census was on the calendar for the following week, and the abundance of mast, or lack thereof, would give us great clues where to station our counters. No sooner had we set off than we saw a FOX, but on close examination it was clear that it was in MISERABLE condition. Its fur (Aloysius would have said pelage) looked like it might have mange. And it moved with an ODD gait. It was then that we noted that it had a deformed hind leg. It had rained earlier and the poor animal obviously had received a good SOAKING, and it was probably chilled to the bone, and was slowly starving to death. We were also dismayed to see a BEDSTEAD someone had dumped along the trail, in the way that caring humans do. Aloysius joined in our collective dismay, but couldn’t resist stating that his newly installed ferrule would make it much more difficult for trash dumpers to PENETRATE the path any more. Zelda, all one hundred pounds of her, rolled her eyes and leaned towards me. “I’d like to tie him to that bedstead,” she said, and grab his ferrule, and then “penetrate” would have a whole different meaning!” Oh my, Zelda, you are a little devil!

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    1. David M. Gascoigne: I suspect we have all known an Aloysius, and I am with Zelda. I do feel for that poor fox though. Great story.

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    2. Oh, my, Zelda is thinking things not lawful to be uttered! And in a way, i don't blame her. Those Aloysius types are annoying.

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    3. Ha! Reading this with Elgar in the ears: Pomp & Circumstance. Wonderful!

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    4. Hi David - an Aloysius never seem to leave us ... but I love the twist in your tale - thank you ...cheers Hilary

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  19. One beechnut would be tempting, but a beechmast like a carpet spread under the tree, was just too tempting for the usual wily fox. He didn’t venture out from the shrubbery until after being sensible and investigating the area, sniffing for any scent of danger. While the air held nothing that suggested a trap, his ears picked up a faint sound barely detectable as if a muffler had been place over it. Still, the sound did penetrate his keen ears, and he crouched salivating for those nuts, but not about to reveal himself until he was sure. The crunch of a leaf underfoot. A sharp intake of breath—human. Then there the man stood, gun in hand, brushing aside the thin layer of earth and pulling out the trap. The fox could wait a bit longer, but the hunter was impatient. Moving the trap to another place. Fox would have to be vigilant. He’d have to warn the others.

    I'll give you some prompts in February, Sue! Tell me how to do it.

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    1. cleemckenzie: Love your story - and my sympathies are ALL with the fox. Thank you for offering to provide the prompts. I will send you and email on the how to issue later.

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    2. Well done! My hope is the warning comes in time for the others, too.

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    3. Sly fox, lovely tale. I go with the fox too. but if it's him eating "my" beechmast not the squirrels and crows, I might chase him away. Good to know.

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    4. Hi Lee - clever fox ... loved it ... perfect of times of yore - and no doubt sadly still today. All the best- Hilary

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  20. The miserable old coot who lives next door is as odd as they come. Yesterday I saw him outside and went to say hello. As I drew closer, a strong odor accosted my nose. Another sniff told me it was vinegar.
    "What are you doing?" I asked.
    "Soaking the footboard from an old bedstead."
    "In vinegar?"
    "Why not? It's good for everything else."
    "What's wrong with the footboard?"
    "Can't get the ferrule off."
    "Why do you want to take it off?"
    "Why not?"
    Contrary. That's what he is. But he's my friend.

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    1. Your story made me smile, i've known a couple of those contrary people, and they are friends.

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    2. Carol Kilgore: I have been out for most of the day, and your story is a delightful treat to come home to. Thank you. I have a soft spot for eccentrics.

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    3. Odd friends are the spice of friendship. Thank you.

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    4. Fun Carol - interesting take - thank you ... Hilary

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  21. These were definitely word challenges:)

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    1. Sandra Cox: They always are - but the participants more than met the challenge.

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  22. I enjoy seeing the words, even if I'm not participating! I hope you are having an enjoyable day, EC!

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    1. Fundy Blue: Thank you. I have had a busy day but I hope a productive one. I hope yours is going well.

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    1. Sakuranko: They are aren't they? Margaret and her friends always test our mettle.

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  24. I wrote a cheekily creepy poem using the words.
    Hope you are doing okay today.
    I swear that I am ready to throw this mouse and keyboard out the window. I've had them for close to 7 years and they've never been great. I may spring for a new set with the holiday money my mother gives me.
    https://poetryofthenetherworld.blogspot.com/2021/11/november-pad-challenge-2021-party.html

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    1. Ornery Owl of Naughty Netherworld Press and Readers Roost (Not Charlotte): I am heading over to read it now.

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    2. You deserve new mouse and keyboard for writing such poetry. Very creepy, but very good poem!

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  25. I put this up at River's site. But, I thought I would put it here as well.
    Maura knew where Ian would be. Ian was under the beechnut tree, scooping nuts up from the beechmast, where all the ripe ones would lie. Why? Ian did this, investigating the unknown. Ian helped his father repair the muffler, after which Ian took it apart. Maura sighed, thankful that her son was sensible when it safe or not safe. She sighed again.
    From the clothesline, she watched as Ian came running across the field. He carried a heavy bag, one which bulged and wiggled. He dropped it at her feet, his words coming at a race pace. “Looklooklook…” Mom looked down in time to see claws penetrate and rip the bag open. A fox scampered out and across the field.
    A load of beechmast poured out, half a shiny brown and other a vanilla color. Ian suggested, “Let’s cook these with the mash! They could be delicious!” Mom. Sighed. Again.

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    1. Susan Kane: Thank you. Here, or on your own blog is the appropriate place this month since the prompts are here.
      This is a great snippet. Despite his mother's fears, Ian will go far. And how I would love to see a fox - it has been too long.

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    2. Beechnuts are delicious, Ian is rigth. I hope he goes on being Ian!

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    3. Excellent Susan ... I can certainly imagine it - cheers Hilary

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