Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Thursday, 22 January 2015

Watching me, watching you.







He was watching, wasn't he?

119 comments:

  1. Wait, did you just take my picture?

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    1. Alex J. Cavanaugh: You have a problem with that?

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  2. He was watching to make sure you got his best side!

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    1. Margaret Adamson: Every side is his best side. Or he and I think so anyway.

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  3. He was posing. A star is born.

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    1. Maybe he's really a she, turning, pausing, posing like those models on the runway!

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    2. Guyana-Gyal: More beautiful than any runway model - whatever the gender.

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  4. He is pretty! And he knows it! A real model going through all his poses!

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    1. Teresa: He/she was more than happy to pose for me too. I looked up, saw him looking in and wandered off to get the camera. And he posed beautifully.

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  5. Yes, he was watching, glorious photos.

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    1. Bob Bushell: He visits most afternoons. And is more than welcome.

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  6. Oh wow. So pretty. I especially like the yellow feathers.

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    1. Stephanie Faris: The yellow feathers form a crest which is raised to express alarm, interest, or when they land. Earlier this week I picked up a discarded one, which I have kept. A pretty yellow comma (thanks DJan - love that description).

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  7. Something very mysterious is going on! Don't turn your back, EC. :)

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    1. Lee: The mystery was how long the corellas would hog the feeder. Answer? Quite a while.

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  8. He's got his eye on you!!

    Pearl

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    1. Pearl: It seems only fair - I spend a lot of time with my eye on him.

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  9. He or she is a grand looking fellow.
    Merle...........

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    1. Merlesworld: Most definitely. I know it, they know it.

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  10. Replies
    1. Joanne Noragon: Rather a lot of things (and people) have my number. I am obviously very predictable.

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  11. Oh yes. Having been up close and personal with these intelligent, cheeky birds, they're watching and taking it all in...

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    1. Vicki: Cheeky charmers. I read this week that all cockatoos are left-handed. Have you noticed? We are checking, and so far it seems to be true.

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    2. Interesting. I'll be sure to watch and learn. And see which "hands" the other parrots favour too. Thanks for that :)

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    3. Really! Now I'll have to check too. And check the Lorrikeets as well. We are so lucky and privileged to live with these amazing characters.

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    4. Vicki and Carol: I suspect it was someone's PhD subject - but we found it fascinating. And so far it checks out. The cockies who visit us do seem to use their left foot/claws much more often.

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    5. Yep, left handed alright. I watched some this afternoon :)

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    6. Vicki: Isn't it amazing? I will be watching other birds too.

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  12. Replies
    1. Karen S.: Definitely cute - and a big show off.

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  13. Your just feeding his vanity. Definitely he was watching you as he showed off his beauty. He's adorable.

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    1. Myrna R.: He is so beautiful that I can't help but feed his vanity.

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  14. Gorgeous birds… and wonderful photos of this one! Of course she/he was watching you. And probably was having a long internal dialogue about you. "Why doesn't that big flightless creature put down that shiny object and give me something to eat…?"

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    1. Paper Chipmunk (aka Ellen): You are right. The corellas were on the feeders and he wasn't getting a look in. And there was no apple left. Sins I rectified as soon as I put the camera down.

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  15. I love that pretty little comma on the back of his head. A beautiful creature, EC. :-)

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    1. DJan: I love that description and may well call their crests commas from now on. Thank you.

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  16. Replies
    1. Starting Over, Accepting Changes - Maybe: I think Ellen nailed it. He was thinking about my sins of omission. The corellas had the feeder and there was noooo apple left. Or perhaps his thoughts were deeper. He looked good on it anyway.

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  17. "Did you get my good side?"

    You could publish a great children's book about a character like this!

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    1. Alexia: Of course I got his good side. Every side is a good side. You have me wondering though. There must be a children's book about cockatoos, but I don't know of any. Research required.

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    2. "Stu the Cockatoo is New at the Zoo" - book picked up by Sheldon Cooper of The Big Bang Theory when researching how to make new friends.

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  18. And his crest was down so you obviously weren't bothering him. Is he a frequent visitor EC - as if you can tell lol Although I swear some of the ones I get in the garden are the same ones

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    1. Cathy: Completely relaxed. And yes, we do think that a lot of our visitors are regulars. Which is lovely. There is one (or several?) which perches on the same branches at the same time most days. For photographic sessions. Followed by sustenance.

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  19. So I'm watching it watch you watch it? I can deal with this! Adorable critter, EC.

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    1. John Wiswell: You nailed it. You are indeed watching it watch me watch it. And they are cheeky (and destructive) charmers.

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  20. He most certainly was watching and he's so beautiful. I love the sulphur cresteds.

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    1. River: We love them too. Beautiful, destructive, clever birds. Always welcome here.

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  21. He looks so soft...like you want to touch that feathery breast!

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    1. Bookie: When I was growing up my mother had a pet cockatoo - and that feathery breast is soft. And smooth. And incredibly tactile.

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  22. He certainly was watching you. You took some great photos. I absolutely love them. I agree with Bookie, he looks soft and cuddly to me. I expect he would object at me trying to cuddle him though ;)

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    1. DeniseinVA: He probably would object - which is a shame. It is a magical feeling to stroke a cocky.

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  23. I do think he likes the camera. Great photos, Beautiful creature.

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    1. Mason Canyon: He is partial to the food supply as well. We provide seed, shelter and apples. And they enjoy them, and we enjoy them.

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  24. Replies
    1. Karen: How nice to see you here. How are your eyes? And yes, he is a poser.

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  25. Beautiful bird, beautiful photography. Corella - right ?

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    1. Whisper Mist: Nearly right. He is a sulphur-crested cockatoo - on this occasion kept from the feeder by the corellas.

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  26. Ut oh! Let's hope he doesn't start serenading you!

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    1. Jacquelineand...: Beautiful he is. Musical they are not. No serenades is a bonus.

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  27. So amusing to watch. Maybe he/she thinks the same about you.

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    1. Andrew: They do spend a lot of time looking in through the windows. Food is certainly part of it, but I don't think it is the complete picture.

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  28. I don't see how you could have imagined anything else.

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    1. Grannie Annie: That particular branch of the camellia is just beside the front door. Most afternoons a little after five there is a cockatoo sitting on it, surveying the scene.

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  29. Replies
    1. My Inner Chick: We think so. A beautiful, beautiful bird...

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  30. He must see his reflection in your lens and likes what he sees. Gorgeous bird!

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    1. River Fairchild: Perhaps in the window... And yes, he is gorgeous.

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  31. Replies
    1. A Cuban in London: Big brother (or something) is always watching.

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  32. I think he was looking for a friend. He was late.

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    1. R. Mac Wheeler: He has friends here - early and late.

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  33. Who was stalking who? He is one beauty!

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    1. Deb: I do sometimes feel like a stalker with my obsessive interest with the birds.

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  34. Proper sneaky chops. I hope you keep a hold of your purse when that one is nearby.

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    1. All Consuming: Naive me would probably trust him with my purse. Largely because it is empty.

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  35. Beautifully creamy - and with those wonderful grey feet. He's definitely very aware and intent, isn't he? How can some (too many) people call them "dumb animals"? Far from it.

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    1. In thinking about that expression, maybe the original meaning was simply that they couldn't talk. Which may be true, if one means they can't talk like humans. But they can definitely communicate, so even in that way, they are not "dumb".

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    2. jenny_o: They are incredibly dextrous with those feet too. My mother's cockatoo had a passion for strawberries. But they had to be ripe. He would wander over to the strawberry patch and inspect them, picking them up to ensure that the red was on both sides. If not, he would put them back down - without a mark on them. Ripe ones were picked and scoffed.
      We could learn a lot from 'dumb' animals.

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    3. jenny_o: The same dumb animal dunked the dog's biscuits in his water bowl to soften them and make eating them easier. And plucked the hairs from my father's ears one at a time. A bird of immense character, though not all of it was good. He also delighted in flinging a beak full of debri from the gutter onto the heads of visitors to the home.

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    4. Clever fellow! Sounds like he was great entertainment to have around, as long as you weren't on the receiving end of some of it - ear hairs - ouch ... how long do they live, generally? or at least, how long did your mother's live, in captivity?

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    5. jenny_o: They can live for a very long time. My mother's bird ate his way out of the cage and was free to come and go. He didn't fly (perhaps taken from the nest too early) but spent the next fifteen years stomping around the garden, climbing trees and we think having a good time. He disappeared, and we always thought he had been bird-napped. I hope he bit them.

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    6. I hope so, too - fervently.

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  36. Your very kind to feed them so well. I just might stop by for a snack someday.. :)
    Be well, be happy.. hugs & smiles across the miles, Pam :)

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    1. whims n whispers: You would be more than welcome to stop by for a snack. And I could (probably) come up with something more appetising than seed too.

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  37. Those are gorgeous pictures. I love the beautiful white! (and if this is a duplicate comment, never mind me... it looked like my first one didn't go through).

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    1. mail4rosey: Not a duplicate comment. Thank you for persevering.

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  38. Beautiful bird! Such exotic creatures - amazing to me that they live wild, since i've always seen them in captivity! He was posing. Absolutely posing!

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    1. daisyfae: They are kept in captivity here too - my mother had one when I was a child. I love to see them flying free though, often in flocks with more than a hundred birds. One of my best memories of wild birds is seeing a flock of several hundred wild budgies. Bliss.

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  39. What a pretty bird! What is that lovely plumage on the back of his head called?

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    1. mshatch: The yellow feathers form a crest which is raised when the bird is curious, alarmed and also when they land. Spectacular.

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  40. He was looking curiously at you, wondering "What the heck is that? Can I eat it?"

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    1. Michael D'Agostino: Fortunately the cockies here don't chew on the house - which they do at two of my brothers' homes. They are curious birds, and can be very, very destructive.

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  41. My wife and I have two parakeets, even though your photos aren't of parakeets, this really hit home for me, thank you!

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    1. Lon Anderson: I am obsessed with birds (among other things) and they frequently feature here. I am glad you enjoyed our cockatoo (who is of the parrot family).

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  42. He was definitely trying to figure out what was going on. ;) Great photos!
    ~Jess

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    1. DMS (Jess): He is there most days, watching us, as we watch him. Or her.

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  43. For sure. Probably taking mental notes, too, for all we humans know of anything.

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    1. Strayer: It seems only fair. I am also certain that the birds take quite extensive mental notes. How is to be trusted, who is not...

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  44. What a beautiful bird, and it looks like he was posing just for you. I've only seen birds like that in a cage or sitting on someone's shoulder. How much better it'd be to see them in the wild... as they were meant to be.

    Happy weekend!

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    1. Susan: We see them caged here too, and my mother had one (though it didn't stay caged for long). Free is better. Much, much better.

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  45. I love that 3rd picture down. What great shots you took!

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    1. 2justByou: Thank you. He/she was so patient that it would have been hard not to get a good photo or two. Mind you, there were shots I deleted as well.

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  46. Of course he way!!! I wish I had birds like him in my garden (I think this is one of my "standard" comments on your blog when you post lovely images like these!).

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    1. Carola Bartz: I love that the blogosphere allows us to share images, and feel jealousy more often than I like to admit when I see other people's (including yours) magic.

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  47. Watching with his wise eye. Yes he was.

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    1. Lynn: Wise, and more than a little mischievious.

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    1. Riot Kitty: And he, and his relatives have been back several times since.

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  49. Oh my dragon goodness! I knew I had missed out gorgeous sights lately! That's such a beauty. I think I'm going to marry a parrot instead of a dragon...

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    1. Al Diaz: They are indeed gorgeous. And intelligent rather than wise. Not quite as powerful as a dragon either...

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  50. Adorable and as I always tend to comment, it's absolutely magical to a northener that you have cockatoos and other (to us) exotic birds so close and personal. I'm in awe. When I ordered my cockatoo scarf (which I've just blogged about) I was thinking of you and how much you would probably love it. Not sure wool scarf is a thing Australian weather would ever call for though;)

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    1. Pia K: I LOVE your cockatoo scarf. I couldn't wear it - but I would display it. It has nearly as much charm as the birds themselves.

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